Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What on earth is this?
Thank you,
Eric

Hi Eric,
We really don’t want to do anything to encourage identification requests like yours, devoid of helpful information, so we will request that you return to the site to get your answer. These are mating Wheel Bugs, a species of Assassin Bug, and they are highly beneficial insects that devour quantities of harmful garden insects. We absolutely love the photograph.

Sorry. Additional info: These were located on my deck railing in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. We live in development that used to be an old orchard. Many of the orchard trees still exist and these photos were taken directly under a black walnut tree which catapillars recently ravaged. So, hopefully these little ‘assassin’ gems are getting their fill !!! Thank you for you help.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What on earth is this?
Thank you,
Eric

Hi Eric,
We really don’t want to do anything to encourage identification requests like yours, devoid of helpful information, so we will request that you return to the site to get your answer. These are mating Wheel Bugs, a species of Assassin Bug, and they are highly beneficial insects that devour quantities of harmful garden insects. We absolutely love the photograph.

Sorry. Additional info: These were located on my deck railing in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. We live in development that used to be an old orchard. Many of the orchard trees still exist and these photos were taken directly under a black walnut tree which catapillars recently ravaged. So, hopefully these little ‘assassin’ gems are getting their fill !!! Thank you for you help.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wheel Bug Love
Hello! I found your website very useful a few weeks ago when I was IDing some moths, and I thought you might enjoy this pic of some wheel bugs I found on my tomato table a few days ago. Thanks for the great site!
Clara

Hi Clara,
As we state on our homepage, it is impossible to answer all our letters. Eventually, after they have sat in the inbox a few days, we must delete. This fills us with guilt, so we open a few hoping for a lost gem. Your photo is one of those lost gems, so we are posting, albeit a few days late. Your mating Wheel Bugs is one of the finest photos of the species we have received.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please identify this bug – when you have time in your busy schedule.
I love your website! I would like to know what kind of bug this is. I came across him as I was photographing bumblebees enjoying these beautiful spiked flowers. I took the photo with my new Canon Digital Rebel XT, which I am really enjoying. Thanks for your help!
Patty Tucker

Hi Patty,
Thank you so much for your polite letter. We are growing weary of the demanding and insensitive tone of so many of the letters we receive. Our delete key is getting plenty of action. This is an Assassin Bug in the genus Pselliopus. We found a match on BugGuide.

Thanks for your quick reply. What a name for a bug! Funny!! I hate that people have to be rude and insensitive. What a waste of life and time! I could tell by the note on your website that you guys were overwhelmed with requests. I was hesitant about even sending my photo. Thanks for a speedy response and for having a great website. The good feeling you have to come away with from the numerous emails you receive, good and bad, is that you guys have created a wonderful, informative and fun website. Way to go! Have a great day!
Patty Tucker
Alabama

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s this guy’s story?
Found this tiny insect (half the diameter of a pencil eraser) on my kitchen counter. The only reason I even saw him was his poor choice of hiding places–on top of a red pizza menu. I thought it was a spider, but can only count 6 legs in my photos. He was a slow mover. Back legs were nearly twice as long as the others. His most distinctive feature is clearly the flaky skin. Perhaps he was just sticky and picked up some crumbs. At the magnification of this shot, he appears to be breaded and deep fried. Can you ID him and provide any insight into his tasty looking, tempura-like coating? Thanks,
Jeff C.

Hi Jeff,
We love your deep fried description of a Masked Bedbug Hunter, one of the Assassin Bugs. This is a nymph, and when this species is immature, it is sticky and gets covered with “lint” which acts as protection. They will feed on Bed Bugs which are reaching epidemic proportions recently.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bee Assassin, White-crossed Seed Bug
Hi Bugman et al,
I’m just another one of your thousands (or is it millions?) of fans that have caught the Bug bug from you. (A seemingly harmless virus that causes the “sufferer” to want to take photos of bugs). Harmless? Perhaps, perhaps not. Bugs can sometimes bug you. After perusing your web site numerous times I just wanted to send you a couple of photos of bugs (True Bugs!) that aren’t Box Elder bugs. You already seem to have a lot of photos of them. I believe one is a Bee Assassin Bug, supposedly he’s great to have in your garden. Good thing, I had a lot of them this summer. The photo was taken June 3, 2006. The other photo is a Whitecrossed Seed Bug (which I can’t understand why they didn’t name it a British Soldier Bug – but then they didn’t ask me) taken on August 25, 2006. Hope you like the photos, isn’t it nice to see something other than a Box Elder Bug? Both photos were taken in Newnan, Coweta County, Georgia.
Karen R. Brooks

Bee AssassinWhitecrossed Seed Bug

Hi Karen,
We are posting your letter a day late and have just finished posting another letter with a Whitecrossed Seed Bug. Thank you so much for sending us these underrepresented species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination