Currently viewing the category: "Syrphid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bee?
Geographic location of the bug:  southwestern ontario
Date: 06/09/2019
Time: 09:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been trying to search what kind of bee this is?! it’s slightly larger than the european honeybee. i can’t find anything online. can you help me please?
How you want your letter signed:  heidi

Hover Fly

Dear Heidi,
This is NOT a Bee.  It is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many members of the family mimic stinging Bees and Wasps to fool predators.  There are some similar looking species in the genus
Eristalis, and we believe, based on BugGuide images, that this is Eristalis obscura.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Scottsdale ,AZ
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 03:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was in my car at lunch June 7th, at noon, with my windows open and it was about 95 degrees out. This fly looking thing flew into my car and perched itself right above my head. It was mostly beige and brown kind of resembled a bee but looked more like a fly. To me it looked like it had a very pretty pattern. The more detailed photo in unretouched, the close up color is enhanced to look more like what I saw rather than what the camera saw.
How you want your letter signed:  Alison O’Konski

Hover Fly

Dear Alison,
This is a harmless Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many non-stinging members of this family mimic the colors and markings of stinging Bees and Wasps as a defense against predators.  We matched your image to an image of
Copestylum apiciferum on the Natural History of Orange County site and we verified that identification on BugGuide where the range map incudes Arizona.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and gold wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  North west England
Date: 05/09/2019
Time: 05:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please can you identify this insect? Very unusual but definitely real
How you want your letter signed:  L W

Hover Fly

Dear L W,
This is not a Wasp.  It is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many of these harmless (don’t sting nor bite), beneficial pollinators effectively mimic stinging insects like Bees and Wasps.  We believe your individual is a male (eyes close together)
Epistrophe grossulariae which is pictured on the British Hoverflies site, though we cannot say for certain that species is correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee
Geographic location of the bug:  California
Date: 04/22/2019
Time: 07:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bee
How you want your letter signed:  What kind of bee

Hover Fly

This is not a Bee.  It is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, a group that includes many members that mimic stinging Bees and Wasps for protection as the Hover Flies neither sting nor bite, and they benefit from being mistaken by predators for stinging insects.  We identified your individual as Eristalinus taeniops on The Natural History of Orange County.  The gap between the eyes on your individual identifies her as female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large black “fly” with clear wings
Geographic location of the bug:  Safari Park Escondido CA
Date: 03/12/2019
Time: 02:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Not sure if this is a rodent bot (?), hope not.
How you want your letter signed:  Linda

Mexican Cactus Fly

Dear Linda,
We love your in flight image of a Mexican Cactus Fly, one of the Hover Flies in the family Syrphidae.  Despite its name, the Mexican Cactus Fly is a native species.  The Mexican Cactus Fly is one of the larger Flies we have seen in our Mount Washington, Los Angeles neighborhood.

Mexican Cactus Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a fly or a wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Stamsund, Lofoten Islands, Norway
Date: 02/15/2019
Time: 07:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I took this picture a couple of years ago in my garden and I never was able to find a proper answer. I wonder if you maybe can give me a clue at least? The colors are very much like a wasp, but the shape doesn’t. From what I remember, it’s bigger than a normal fly.
Cheers from Norway
How you want your letter signed:  Alberto Martinez

Hover Fly

Dear Alberto,
This is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many harmless members of the family benefit from mimicking stinging Bees or Wasps.  Based on this Wikimedia posting, we believe Blomsterfluer is the common name for Hover Fly in Norway.  Your individual looks very similar to 
Chrysotoxum arcuatum which is pictured on Miljolare.no.

Very cool! Thank you very much for all the information!
Regards from Norway
Alberto

Hi again Alberto,
21 years ago, Daniel traveled to Oslo and had an exhibition at UKS called Rudimentary Particles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination