Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Difference between  assassin bug and kissing bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern New Jersey,(Wenonah) right outside of Philadelphia
Date: 04/15/2018
Time: 10:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug in my bathroom sink this morning. I thought it looked like a kissing bug. My bf says, no, it’s an assassin bug. Is there a difference?
How you want your letter signed:  Melody Schantz

Sycamore Assassin Bug

Dear Melody,
The easiest explanation to your subject like is that all Kissing Bugs are Assassin Bugs, but not all Assassin Bugs are Kissing Bugs.  Kissing Bugs in the genus
Triatoma are members of the Assassin Bug family Reduviidae, so they bear a physical resemblance to other Assassin Bugs.  Kissing Bugs pose a significant threat to human health as they carry the pathogen known to cause Chagas Disease in humans.  Many Assassin Bugs will deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled, but the bite does not do any permanent harm.  The insect in your image is a Sycamore Assassin Bug.  It is not a Kissing Bug but it is possible to be bitten by a  Sycamore Assassin Bug.

Wow, thank you so very much for your time and explanation!! I truly appreciate it.
Melody

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this an assasin bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Meani NSW (2234)
Date: 02/25/2018
Time: 08:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bit my wife on the finger when she grabbed it accidentally, attempting to cut the flower. Had a sharp pain for the next few minutes, but it subsided. This is now about 30 hours later and the area is warm, and she feels numbness and tingling.
Is this an assasin bug? does she need medical help?
How you want your letter signed:  Menai Resident

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Menai Resident,
This is indeed an immature Assassin Bug and it appears to be an immature Common Assassin Bug,
Pristhesancus plagipennis, that is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.  While the bite of most Assassin Bugs will only produce a local reaction, individual reactions may differ due to allergies and other factors.  We are not qualified to dispense medical advice, but considering the time that has elapsed, it might be wise to consider seeing a specialist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Pilbara, West Australia
Date: 02/11/2018
Time: 08:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I got bitten on the neck by this bug today, It was quite painful for about an hour, can you please help identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Bitten on the neck

Assassin Bug

Dear Bitten on the neck,
This is a predatory Assassin Bug.  Though members of one group commonly called Kissing Bugs feed on mammalian blood and are known to bite humans, this is not one of those.  Most Assassin Bugs feed on other insects, but some species will bite readily if provoked, handled carelessly, or accidentally encountered when they get trapped in clothing.  Your individual looks exactly like one represented in a prior posting to our site, and that encounter also resulted in a bite.

Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  winnipeg Manitoba Canada
Date: 01/29/2018
Time: 04:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  please identify this bug I found crawling across a cement floor at work
How you want your letter signed:  bob

Masked Hunter

Hi Bob,
This is an immature Masked Hunter, a species of predatory Assassin Bug.  The exoskeleton of a newly molted immature Masked Hunter is sticky, and it attracts debris that helps to camouflage the insect, and helps explain the common name.  Masked Hunters might bite if carelessly handled, but they will also help to keep unwanted creatures from proliferating.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  beetle Tanzania
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Date: 01/14/2018
Time: 05:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please identify this beetle
How you want your letter signed:  Doug

Unknown Assassin Bug

Dear Doug,
This is NOT a Beetle.  It is an Assassin Bug in the family Reduviidae, and we are posting it as unidentified while we attempt to get you a more specific identification.

Subject:  Assassin bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 08:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been unable to identify this insect beyond the likelihood that it is an assassin bug. This specimen has rather thick muscular legs with distinctive orange fore and mid legs and the rest of the body and hind legs completely black. Approximate body length = 2.5 cm. Someone suggested this to be in the genus Phonergates but haven’t found any representatives of this genus that look remotely like this one.
How you want your letter signed:  DCavener

Dear DCavener,
Last week Doug submitted this exact image to our site and asked to have the beetle identified.  We responded it was an Assassin Bug, not a Beetle, but we still have not located a genus or species name.

Oops yes, sorry about that! Someone else speculates that this is Phonergates bicoloripes but I can’t find images online or even a detailed description of this species. Is this something you could help with?

The individual from the genus pictured on Discover Life does look similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug name
Geographic location of the bug:  India
Date: 12/28/2017
Time: 10:27 PM EDT
Hi ,
Can please let me know what bug it is
How you want your letter signed:  Yes [Prakash]

Assassin Bug

Dear Prakash,
This is a very beautiful Assassin Bug in the family Reduviidae, but we have not had any luck finding a matching image online that identifies the species.  This image from Alamy is similarly colored, but it has spines your individual lacks.  Handle Assassin Bugs with care.  They might bite.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination