Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: F^©%ed up bug
Location: Brisbane
January 10, 2017 8:42 pm
Its got 6 legs, the bottom half is yellow with orange stripes on the side the top half is black, the legs are orange and black, the entanas are orange, looks like a stinger at the front, moves slow asf,
Signature: By tellin me what the fck this

Common Assassin Bug

We would urge you to handle this Common Assassin Bug, Pristhesancus plagipennis, which we identified on the Brisbane Insect site, with extreme caution.  Though it is not a dangerous species, it can deliver a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: millipede assassin bug
Location: Dordrecht, Eastern Cape, South Africa
January 7, 2017 11:16 pm
Bugman
Here are my images, but I am unable to load three at a time so I am going to try and send them one by one.
Enjoy!
Signature: Lollie Venter

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
When you submitted a comment to a posting in our archives of Millipede Assassin Bugs preying on a Millipede, we did not imagine that your images were going to be as spectacular as they turned out to be.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.  According to Beetles in the Bush, the Millipede Assassin Bugs
:  “Ectrichodia crux belongs to the subfamily Ectrichodiinae, noted for their aposematic coloration – often red or yellow and black or metallic blue, and as specialist predators of Diplopoda (Heteropteran Systematics Lab @ UCR).  Species in this subfamily are most commonly found in leaf litter, hiding during the day under stones or amongst debris and leaving their shelters at night in search of millipedes (Scholtz and Holm 1985). They are ambush predators that slowly approach their prey before quickly grabbing the millipede and piercing the body with their proboscis, or “beak.”  Saliva containing paralytic toxins and cytolytic enzymes is injected into the body of the millipede to subdue the prey and initiate digestion of the body contents, which are then imbibed by the gregariously feeding assassin bugs.”

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
Thanks for sending us additional images.  We now have six of your images posted to our site.

Daniel,
The video is still in production.  Will send it as soon as it has been done.
Regards
Lollie

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bug with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: San Jose ca USA
December 17, 2016 2:04 pm
Just wondering what this is.
Signature: Thank you

Possibly Four Spurred Assassin Bug

Possibly Four Spurred Assassin Bug

This is a predatory Assassin Bug and we believe it is in the genus Zelus, possibly the Four Spurred Assassin Bug, Zelus tetracanthus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Though not considered dangerous to humans, Assassin Bugs in the genus Zelus are known to deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled or accidentally encountered.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A bug I had not met…
Location: Puerto Escondido Mexico
December 1, 2016 11:48 am
Hello, are you able to tell me what type of bug this is? We found him in our porch today while on holiday in Mexico (in early December)
Thanks
Signature: David

Kissing Bug

Kissing Bug

Dear David,
You should exercise caution in your encounters with this Blood-Sucking Conenose Bug or Kissing Bug in the genus
Triatoma, a group that is connected to the spread of Chagas Disease, especially in the tropics.  According to the Central Washington University site:  “Triatoma (Reduviidae: Triatominae), are blood sucking insects that transmit the single-celled parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae), which infects mammals, including humans, throughout much of Latin America.”  Though humans are not the primary host for Kissing Bugs, when other hosts, especially rodents are not available, human blood provides a ready substitute.  Based on image on the Central Washington University site, your individual might be  Triatoma longipennis.

Thanks very much!
All the best
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This has bitten my daughter. Is it a type of Assasian Bug?
Location: Canberra, Australia
December 5, 2016 11:45 pm
Hello, thank you so much for your help in advance. This has just bitten my young daughter on her wrist. It’s left a red bite that has swollen into a huge welt very fast. She certainly screamed and screamed so it must have been very painful.
I think it is a type of Assasian Bug but I’m not quite sure. If it is .. is that dangerous? Ive given her some bite cream to use and an antihistamine tablet.
We live in Canberra, Australia.
Thank you
Signature: Fiona Crispin

Ground Assassin Bug

Ground Assassin Bug

Dear Fiona,
This is indeed a Ground Assassin Bug,
Ectomocoris patricius, a species we identified on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “We found those orange and black assassin bugs running very fast on forest floor. This bug will bite if handle by bare hand. The insect has very strong front pair legs. All its legs are orange in colour. Its orange colour body and black pattern are the standard assassin bug warning colours. ”  This appears to be a wingless female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s that bug
Location: tx
December 4, 2016 5:23 pm
I was wondering what this bug is it stings an hurts like hell it has green legs all most like grass hopper an a body almost like wasp it leaves a welp that turns into red dot
Signature: Angela Clem

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Dear Angela,
This is a beneficial, predatory Assassin Bug in the genus Zelus, probably a Leafhopper Assassin Bug.  Assassin Bugs do not sting.  They have mouths designed to pierce and suck, so you were bitten, not stung. Though it is painful, the bite if a Leafhopper Assassin Bug is not considered dangerous.

Assassin Bug Bite

Assassin Bug Bite

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination