Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Noblesville Indiana
Date: 08/02/2019
Time: 11:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It sure looked mean. The body might have been 5/8″ long.
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff

Wheel Bug

Dear Jeff,
Like other Assassin Bugs, the predatory Wheel Bug is quite capable of biting a human, however, unlike several other Assassin Bugs including those in genus
Zelus, the Sycamore Assassin Bugs and the infamous Kissing Bugs, we almost never get reports of bites from Wheel Bugs.  We have several awesome images of Wheel Bugs on our site, and your image is one of the best.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink winged insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Central texas
Date: 08/03/2019
Time: 10:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son found this bug outside of our home in central Texas.
How you want your letter signed:  Tucker Lockhart

Newly molted Kissing Bug

Dear Tucker,
This is definitely an Assassin Bug and we believe its coloration is due to recent metamorphosis and that it will soon darken.  The potentially alarming news is that though your image lacks critical detail, we believe this is one of the Kissing Bugs in the genus
Triatoma that are known to spread Chagas Disease in humans.  See Texas A&M Agrilife Extension for images and information regarding Kissing Bugs.

Ok, here it is several hours later. Kissing bug??

Kissing Bug

This is definitely a Kissing Bug in the genus Triatoma.  It looks to us like an Eastern Blood Sucking Conenose Bug, Triatoma sanguisuga, which is reported from Texas based on BugGuide information where it states:  “Sometimes bites humans, and the bite may be severe, causing an allergic reaction.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large leaf bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Quincy, Il
Date: 07/19/2019
Time: 08:57 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this “little” guy climbing on us and he was very content to climb around instead of flying. Can you tell what he is?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in Quincy

Wheel Bug

Dear Curious in Quincy,
This magnificent predator is a Wheel Bug, and like many other members of the family, it is fully capable of biting.  The bite of a Wheel Bug is not considered dangerous, but it might be painful, so you should handle Wheel Bugs with caution in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange looking bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Holden Beach, NC
Date: 07/10/2019
Time: 10:59 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug appeared on our door. It’s quite different and I can’t tell if it’s in the Mantid or the Grasshopper family. Maybe neither! I’m hoping you will tell me.
How you want your letter signed:  Ronald

Wheel Bug

Dear Ronald,
This is neither a Mantid nor a Grasshopper.  It is a predatory Assassin Bug known as a Wheel Bug.  Your image beautifully illustrates the cog-like projection on the thorax that explains the common name.  Like other Assassin Bugs, Wheel Bugs might bite if carelessly handled.  They have a proboscis designed to suck fluids from their prey, and a puncture to the skin from that proboscis is likely quite painful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  1 inch big with spots
Geographic location of the bug:  South Texas
Date: 07/01/2019
Time: 01:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, what is this?
How you want your letter signed:  G

Kissing Bug

Dear G,
This is a Kissing Bug or Blood Sucking Conenose Bug in the genus
Triatoma, a group that has garnered significant publicity in recent years because it spreads Chagas Disease through biting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Baltimore, Maryland
Date: 06/28/2019
Time: 11:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug is rare
How you want your letter signed:  Shay

Wheel Bug Nymph

Dear Shay,
This is an immature Wheel Bug.  Wheel Bugs are not considered rare.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination