Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Harrisonburg, VA
Date: 11/07/2019
Time: 02:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This creepy crawler landed on my son-in-law while we were at the winery. It was so interesting I snapped a photo. But! I can’t figure out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Paula

Wheel Bug

Dear Paula,
Your son-in-law encountered a Wheel Bug, the largest, predatory Assassin Bug in North America.  Though many Assassin Bugs will bite if provoked or if they feel threatened, and though the bite might be painful, Wheel Bugs are reluctant to bite humans and the bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wheel Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Rutherford County, Middle Tennessee
Date: 10/02/2019
Time: 08:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This year marks my first signing of a living wheel bug, which is very exciting!! Unfortunately, I’ve also found more dead wheel bugs than I’ve seen in my entire life. Do you know if they naturally die after mating/laying eggs or if perhaps the unusual heat is getting them? I’ve been finding them upside down on sidewalks, so I figure they could be overheating there.
How you want your letter signed:  Josie

Wheel Bug

Dear Josie,
Thanks for sending in your image of a Wheel Bug.  Wheel Bugs only survive for one season, and most are probably killed by the first major frost of the year.  We don’t know why you are finding so many dead Wheel Bugs at this time.  We do not believe the heat is a factor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Odd Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Mass
Date: 09/23/2019
Time: 06:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  No one I’ve asked remembers ever seeing a bug like this before, even the horticulturally inclined. Seen on Sept 10th
How you want your letter signed:  Curiouser and curiouser

Immature Sycamore Assassin Bug

Dear Curiouser and curiouser,
This is an immature Sycamore Assassin Bug, a beneficial predator in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Hotchkiss, CO USA
Date: 08/22/2019
Time: 06:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Agustin

Wheel Bug

Dear Agustin,
This is a Wheel Bug, and we did not realize they ranged as far west as Colorado, but BugGuide data also reports them in Arizona.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Noblesville Indiana
Date: 08/02/2019
Time: 11:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It sure looked mean. The body might have been 5/8″ long.
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff

Wheel Bug

Dear Jeff,
Like other Assassin Bugs, the predatory Wheel Bug is quite capable of biting a human, however, unlike several other Assassin Bugs including those in genus
Zelus, the Sycamore Assassin Bugs and the infamous Kissing Bugs, we almost never get reports of bites from Wheel Bugs.  We have several awesome images of Wheel Bugs on our site, and your image is one of the best.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink winged insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Central texas
Date: 08/03/2019
Time: 10:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son found this bug outside of our home in central Texas.
How you want your letter signed:  Tucker Lockhart

Newly molted Kissing Bug

Dear Tucker,
This is definitely an Assassin Bug and we believe its coloration is due to recent metamorphosis and that it will soon darken.  The potentially alarming news is that though your image lacks critical detail, we believe this is one of the Kissing Bugs in the genus
Triatoma that are known to spread Chagas Disease in humans.  See Texas A&M Agrilife Extension for images and information regarding Kissing Bugs.

Ok, here it is several hours later. Kissing bug??

Kissing Bug

This is definitely a Kissing Bug in the genus Triatoma.  It looks to us like an Eastern Blood Sucking Conenose Bug, Triatoma sanguisuga, which is reported from Texas based on BugGuide information where it states:  “Sometimes bites humans, and the bite may be severe, causing an allergic reaction.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination