Currently viewing the category: "Assassin Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this sunflower loving bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix, Arizona. USA
Date: 05/21/2018
Time: 10:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This 6 legged bug likes sunflowers. Never seen this bug in my entire life. Black, red and yellow.  Any idea what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Andrea ~

Yellow Bellied Bee Assassin

Dear Andrea,
As soon as we read your submission, we suspected you encountered a Yellow Bellied Bee Assassin,
Apiomerus flaviventris, and sure enough, you had.  Bee Assassins are predatory Assassin Bugs and as their name implies, they favor pollinating insects including Bees, and they frequently wait on blooms like your sunflower for a meal to arrive.  According to BugGuide:  “This species exhibits a high level of polychromatism although in the United States the color pattern is fairly uniform.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dinosaur bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Worth, TX
Date: 05/09/2018
Time: 06:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was seen a couple years ago.  It’s on a reed over a small backyard pond.  I have no idea where to even start looking to find out what it is.  It looks prehistoric to me!
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks! Jeanne

Wheel Bug

Dear Jeanne,
Your image is gorgeous.  You are not the first person to write to us with the observation that the Wheel Bug looks prehistoric.  The Wheel Bug is the largest North American Assassin Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Ontario Canada
Date: 04/29/2018
Time: 02:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug crawling on some laundry
How you want your letter signed:  Regards

Immature Masked Hunter

This is an immature Masked Hunter, a species frequently found indoors in the northern sections of North America.  The Masked Hunter is a predatory Assassin Bug that is capable of biting a human if it is carelessly handled.  Immature Masked Hunters have a sticky exoskeleton that allows dust and debris to stick to the insect, effectively camouflaging it in its environment.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of “nest” might this be?
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern shore of maryland
Date: 04/29/2018
Time: 01:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you help identify if this is an insect or bees nest?  It’s fairly small.  Less than an inch long and less than a half inch wide.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Bobbie

Wheel Bug Eggs

Dear Bobbie,
These sure look like Wheel Bug Eggs and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  This is the time of year we begin to get identification requests for hatchling Wheel Bugs.  Wheel Bugs are predatory Assassin Bugs that are beneficial in the home garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug seen on my orchid  leaf
Geographic location of the bug:  inside my house in virginia beach
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 05:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I saw this  bug on my orchid. I think he is pretty.
How you want your letter signed:  VA bug lover

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear VA bug lover,
In this case, you chose wisely.  This is an immature Assassin Bug, probably in the genus
Zelus, and it is a predator that will help keep injurious insects from your orchid.  We would urge you to exercise caution.  Though not considered dangerous, we have received several reports of people being bitten by Assassin Bugs in the genus Zelus.

Assassin Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Difference between  assassin bug and kissing bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern New Jersey,(Wenonah) right outside of Philadelphia
Date: 04/15/2018
Time: 10:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug in my bathroom sink this morning. I thought it looked like a kissing bug. My bf says, no, it’s an assassin bug. Is there a difference?
How you want your letter signed:  Melody Schantz

Sycamore Assassin Bug

Dear Melody,
The easiest explanation to your subject like is that all Kissing Bugs are Assassin Bugs, but not all Assassin Bugs are Kissing Bugs.  Kissing Bugs in the genus
Triatoma are members of the Assassin Bug family Reduviidae, so they bear a physical resemblance to other Assassin Bugs.  Kissing Bugs pose a significant threat to human health as they carry the pathogen known to cause Chagas Disease in humans.  Many Assassin Bugs will deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled, but the bite does not do any permanent harm.  The insect in your image is a Sycamore Assassin Bug.  It is not a Kissing Bug but it is possible to be bitten by a  Sycamore Assassin Bug.

Wow, thank you so very much for your time and explanation!! I truly appreciate it.
Melody

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination