Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Cuba
March 22, 2017 4:50 am
Please could you help me ID this beetle we found , whilst on holiday in Cuba
Thank you
Signature: Lynne Demaine

Cotton Stainer

Dear Lynne,
This is not a Beetle, but rather a True Bug.  This is a Cotton Stainer in the genus
Dysdercus, and we believe it is Dysdercus sanguinarius based on this En Advisor Travel site.

Dear Daniel
Many thanks  – that is brilliant and so quick too!
The fact it is not a beetle explains why my attempts to ID it failed miserably!
Best wishes
Lynne

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Camarillo Ca bug
Location: Camarillo, CA
March 18, 2017 5:55 pm
My search only finds a Box Elder bug. Is this what this is?
They are all over my yard.
Signature: Jim

Red Shouldered Bug

Dear Jim,
This is a Red Shouldered Bug,
Jadera haematoloma, not a Boxelder Bug, though they are closely related.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Yards, gardens, riparian areas, and other areas in association with hostplants. Often found in large aggregations feeding on leaking tree sap, dead insects, or seeds that have fallen from trees overhead. Also forms aggregations in winter to hibernate, often in association with human residences.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Extinct bug ?
Location: ColumbusIN
March 16, 2017 11:04 pm
I think i have found a very rare or uncommon bug it was on a flower pot and really freaked me out. I would really apriciate your thoughts thank you.
Signature: Hand?

Wheel Bug Nymph

Dear Hand?,
This Wheel Bug nymph is neither rare nor extinct.  What is unusual is the early sighting during the winter in your northern location.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Want to know if these bugs are harmful or harmless
Location: Central Florida ~ Ormond Beach
March 11, 2017 1:46 pm
These bugs appear to be eating aphids on a particular plant. Should I leave them alone or wash them off the plant. The plant is just something that grew in my garden ~ not particularly important. Current season ~ March 11
Signature: barbara malkus

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Dear Barbara,
These appear to the the nymphs of Large Milkweed Bugs,
Oncopeltus fasciatus, a species normally found on milkweed, but sometimes found on oleander.  We are surmising that milkweed, which is the food plant for the Monarch Butterfly, sprouted in your garden.  Large Milkweed Bugs normally feed on seeds, but if they are eating Aphids, that is a good thing.  In our opinion, you should leave them be.

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What on earth is this bug?
Location: On my mango tree in the yard…
March 10, 2017 8:09 am
Hello Bugman,
I live in Antigua, the Caribbean. I usually spot these red and black bugs in huge amounts on the beach, but now, they are on all over my mango tree!!! Should I light my tree on fire?!??! Are they harmful? What on earth are these?
Signature: Mel

Milkweed Assassin Bug

Dear Mel,
This is a beneficial Assassin Bug that will help eliminate pests from your mango tree.  We believe this is a Milkweed Assassin Bug,
Zelus longipes, a North American species with a range that includes “so. US (so. Atlantic & Gulf states to so. CA) to Argentina” according to BugGuide.  Assassin Bugs might bite if carelessly handled.

Milkweed Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny praying mantis?
Location: Gilroy, CA, Watsonville Road near Uvas Creek: 37.02912ºN, -121.65475ºW
March 1, 2017 2:07 am
My grandson and I found this tiny bug dragging a moth across the screen of my tent. Although it looked like a praying mantis, it was so tiny that I wondered if it really was one. Could it be an instar? I I remember instars from Entomology at Cal Poly, but I couldn’t tell if it had wings. I released it after the photo shoot, but, alas, the moth was dead.
My grandson and I caught it October 3, 2010 around 5 pm and I have always wondered about it. I just ran across the pictures about the same time I received notification that there was a new comment about the Pacific Green Sphinx I submitted 1/17/2015, which reminded me to get in gear and find out about my tiny friend.
Signature: Bob

Thread Legged Bug eats Moth

Dear Bob,
This is actually an Assassin Bug in the subfamily Emesinae, a group known as Thread Legged Bugs.  The moth appears to be a Geometer.  We are happy to hear the notice you received on the Pacific Green Sphinx triggered this new submission.

Thread Legged Bug

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your super fast reply.  Wow!  An Assassin Bug?  I would not have ever guessed that!  The way it held its front legs made it look like a praying mantis to me, but I knew something was amiss because the rest of it looked more like a walking stick.
Thanks again.
Bob

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination