Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  wesley chapel florida
Date: 06/22/2020
Time: 07:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  just curious if this mantis is native to florida or the u.s. in general, if this is the adult or juvenile form it was tiny crawling in the sand where I was working amazing little creature.
How you want your letter signed:  ahardy

Spiny Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear ahardy,
This is not a Mantis, but your mistake is understandable as both Mantids and this Spiny Assassin Bug nymph from the genus
Sinea both have raptoreal front legs they use to grasp prey.  Handle with caution.  Assassin Bugs might bite if carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge black beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Ontario Canada
Date: 05/26/2020
Time: 11:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this bug?
How you want your letter signed:  Hello

Toe-Biter

This is not a Beetle.  It is anaquatic Giant Water Bug commonly called a Toe-Biter.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  spider looking bug on curtain
Geographic location of the bug:  singapore
Date: 04/02/2020
Time: 05:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i found this egg cluster on my curtain and there were a few bunch of eggs surrounded by insects with 8(?) legs and i’m scarred.
How you want your letter signed:  –

True Bug Hatchlings

These are newly hatched True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera.  Though there are some True Bugs like Bed Bugs and Kissing Bugs that will bite humans, most True Bugs are not directly harmful to people, though many are considered plant pests.  We cannot identify these True Bug hatchlings more specifically, but in our opinion, you have no cause for alarm.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Metallic Green w/ black pattern
Geographic location of the bug:  Taveuni, Fiji
Date: 03/27/2020
Time: 05:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a jewel beetle? It had landed on this floating seed pod and had not quite tucked his wing away. My underwater camera was already set up for macro so I wiped the lens and shot topside.
Roughly about 2 cm. Segmented antennae. Hard shell. Small thorax.
How you want your letter signed:  Richard

Jewel Bug

Dear Richard,
This is not a Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae.  It is not a beetle at all.  This is a Shield Bug in the family Scutelleridae, and because of their often bright, metallic colors, they are sometimes commonly called Jewel Bugs.  So this is a Jewel Bug, not a Jewel Beetle.  We have not had much luck identifying the species, but we did locate a matching image on The Organic Bunny blog, but you have to scroll down to see the unidentified image.

Thank you so much! You are the best!
Richard Todd

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Brown and Yellow Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Mexico
Date: 03/20/2020
Time: 11:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi WTB! I’ve looked high and low trying to identify this beetle(?) but have had no luck so far. I saw many of them on the leaves of plants in the fields near my house in Mexico. This was taken in September a few years back. It was in a canyon in the desert if that helps. Any ideas? Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Danny

Jewel Bug

Dear Danny,
This is not a Beetle.  It is a Shield Bug or Jewel Bug in the family Scutellaridae, and we identified it as 
Orsilochides scurrilis on Buggin’ Around.  It is also pictured on Naturalista.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beautiful assassin
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Utah
Date: 02/08/2020
Time: 07:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this beauty in my garage and looking for second opinions as to the ID.
How you want your letter signed:  Jason

Assassin Bug:  Fitchia spinosula

Dear Jason,
We believe we have correctly identified your Assassin Bug as
Fitchia spinosula based on this BugGuide image.  Because it does not have developed wings, we originally thought this was an immature individual, but according to BugGuide:  “Micropterous individuals are more common, although macropterous forms do exist. Macroptery is more common in males than females.”  According to Merriam-Webster, micropterous means “having small or rudimentary wings.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination