Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug in cabin
Geographic location of the bug:  Vermont
Date: 02/13/2018
Time: 04:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you ID THE BUG IN THE PHOTO?
How you want your letter signed:  Ken Petretti

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Ken,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug is an insect with well documented behavior of entering homes when the weather cools so it can hibernate.  Native to the Pacific Northwest, the Western Conifer Seed Bug has greatly expanded its range in the last 50 year.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much. We were/are concerned as our grand children visit our cabin often.
I looked at your link which provided additional information.
What would you suggest the best way to contain and eliminate these bugs?
Thank you,
Ken
They are not dangerous.  We do not provide extermination advice.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  please identify
Geographic location of the bug:  ny
Date: 02/14/2018
Time: 08:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hello sir, I found this in my attic…I dont ln
kn ow what it is..
How you want your letter signed:  thank you?

Possibly Immature Western Conifer Seed Bug

This is an immature True Bug in the family Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bugs, and we believe it is the nymph of a Western Conifer Seed Bug (see BugGuide) a species that enters homes as the weather cools so it can hibernate over the winter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need a a bug identified
Geographic location of the bug:  Unoted States
Date: 02/10/2018
Time: 07:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I purchased a motorhome and it is infested with these bugs,  can you please help?
How you want your letter signed:  Michelle

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Michelle,
The invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a species native to Asia, has naturalized throughout much of North America in the last decade.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs often seek shelter indoors to hibernate when weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Pilbara, West Australia
Date: 02/11/2018
Time: 08:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I got bitten on the neck by this bug today, It was quite painful for about an hour, can you please help identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Bitten on the neck

Assassin Bug

Dear Bitten on the neck,
This is a predatory Assassin Bug.  Though members of one group commonly called Kissing Bugs feed on mammalian blood and are known to bite humans, this is not one of those.  Most Assassin Bugs feed on other insects, but some species will bite readily if provoked, handled carelessly, or accidentally encountered when they get trapped in clothing.  Your individual looks exactly like one represented in a prior posting to our site, and that encounter also resulted in a bite.

Assassin Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Australia northern Victoria
Date: 02/07/2018
Time: 08:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  we have lots of these and don’t know what they are
How you want your letter signed:  Bradley

Coon Bugs

Hi Bradley,
These look to us like Coon Bugs.  According to Cesar Australia:  “The coon bug is a seed and fruit feeder, which occasionally swarms on cultivated plants including cotton, stone fruits and some vegetables. They prefer malvaceous plants such as marshmallow weed, but can reach pest status on crops, especially in dry seasons when other food is scarce. Feeding causes young fruit to shrivel and leaves discoloured patches on ripening fruit. These small bugs are most abundant in warm weather and are often found swarming around fowl yards, on fences and around the walls of houses. Adults are about 3 mm long with a black and white body. Nymphs are black with a conspicuous blood-red abdomen.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  England
Date: 02/09/2018
Time: 01:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this in a salad from Morrison’s and can’t find what it is or where it’s from
How you want your letter signed:  J Mccormack

Soldier Bug

Dear J,
This is not a Beetle.  It is a True Bug.  It looks to us like a Soldier Bug,
Spilostethus pandurus.  Here is an image of an individual on Alamy that was sighted in Germany.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination