Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug in vegetable garden
Geographic location of the bug:  Dartmouth, MA
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 07:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve had a garden for years, but this is the first year that I’m seeing this bug on my plants.  In the picture, it is on a pumpkin vine.  I’ve also seen it on the zucchini plants. It’s white with brown markings.  This one is larger that most I’ve seen, about 1/4 inch.  Any help would be appreciated!
How you want your letter signed:  Cyndee

Probably Squash Bug Nymph

Dear Cyndee,
This is a True Bug nymph, and immature stages can be very difficult to identify with accuracy.  Furthermore, we believe it is an immature Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae.  It looks similar to both this immature Coreid Bug in the genus
Catorhintha that is pictured on BugGuide as well as this Squash Bug nymph, Anasa tristis, that is pictured on BugGuide.  Of the latter, BugGuide indicates “Hosts: Cucurbitaceae; prefers pumpkin and squash” and “the most injurious coreid in FL.” Its presence on your pumpkin and zucchini is a good indication it is a Squash Bug nymph.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  northern Nevada
Date: 08/14/2019
Time: 01:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These came in a couple of days ago and now they’re everywhere.
How you want your letter signed:  Harold

Immature Conchuela Bug

Dear Harold,
This is an immature Stink Bug called the Conchuela Bug,
Chlorochroa ligata.  Here is an image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “prefers fleshy fruits of various plants, especially agarita, balsam-gourd and mesquite; also on sage, yucca, mustards, prickly pear (Opuntia), and various crops (cotton, alfalfa, corn, sorghum, grapes, peas, tomatoes, etc.); primarily a seed feeder preferring leguminous plants (once mesquite beans dry, the bugs move to more succulent plants). many observed, including likely eggs and nymphs, on allthorn (Koeberlinia spinosa).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sierra Nevada bug I cant identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Sierra range
Date: 08/12/2019
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, encountered this lovely green and red (or orange?) bug at 9800 feet near a lake in eastern Sierras near mammoth,
CA. An entomologist friend thought it was a “true bug” but wasn’t sure specifically what it was. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Craig P

Unidentified Mirid Plant Bug

Hi Craig,
When it comes to attempting to identify unknown insects, large and showy creatures with a wide distribution range are much more likely to be documented with online images than are smaller insects with a limited range.  Species only found at higher elevations are often poorly represented on the internet.  We agree with the entomologist that this is a True Bug, but if that was the best the entomologist could provide, we might be going out on a limb stating we believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae.  It looks similar to the Scarlet Plant Bug pictured on The Natural History of Orange County, but it is obviously a different species.  We had no luck browsing BugGuide which indicates there are 1930 members of the family in North America.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize your Mirid Plant Bug.

Thank you so much! That alone is helpful (and interesting). Had no idea this would be such a stumper, but I’m also a novice.
Thanks again. Will keep eyes out for more thoughts.
CP

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red and black bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Alexandria, VA
Date: 08/08/2019
Time: 12:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, these guys have recently showed up.  They are black and red, and are all over my Milkweed
How you want your letter signed:  Nicole

Large Milkweed Bug Nymphs

Dear Nicole,
Many people plant milkweed because of Monarch Butterflies, but there are a host of insects that depend upon milkweed for survival, including these Large Milkweed Bug nymphs,
Oncopeltus fasciatus.  According to iNaturalist:  “Juvenile O. fasciatus require the seed of milkweed plants for development and growth. Adults can survive on other types of seeds such as: sunflower, watermelon, almond and cashew, as shown in lab populations. Nymphs live in large groups of about 20 individuals on the plant.”  Since they feed on the seeds and not on the plants, they will not damage the milkweed and there will be plenty of leaves for Monarch caterpillars to feed upon.

Immature Large Milkweed Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Noblesville Indiana
Date: 08/02/2019
Time: 11:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It sure looked mean. The body might have been 5/8″ long.
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff

Wheel Bug

Dear Jeff,
Like other Assassin Bugs, the predatory Wheel Bug is quite capable of biting a human, however, unlike several other Assassin Bugs including those in genus
Zelus, the Sycamore Assassin Bugs and the infamous Kissing Bugs, we almost never get reports of bites from Wheel Bugs.  We have several awesome images of Wheel Bugs on our site, and your image is one of the best.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pink aphid like bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Date: 08/03/2019
Time: 10:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this guy at the top of my milkweed plant on August 2nd 2019. It’s beautiful. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Linda

Predatory Stink Bug nymph

Hi Linda,
Are you by chance growing milkweed to encourage Monarch butterflies?  If you are, you might want to consider relocating this beneficial Predatory Stink Bug nymph away from your milkweed as they have been documented feeding on Monarch Caterpillars.

That would explain why my monarch caterpillars keep disappearing. I have found 3 dead and about 10 just went missing. It’s been very disappointing.
Thanks for the info. I will move the bug to the front garden.
Thank you very much for the information.
Linda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination