Currently viewing the category: "True Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Harrisonburg, VA
Date: 11/07/2019
Time: 02:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This creepy crawler landed on my son-in-law while we were at the winery. It was so interesting I snapped a photo. But! I can’t figure out what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Paula

Wheel Bug

Dear Paula,
Your son-in-law encountered a Wheel Bug, the largest, predatory Assassin Bug in North America.  Though many Assassin Bugs will bite if provoked or if they feel threatened, and though the bite might be painful, Wheel Bugs are reluctant to bite humans and the bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Friend or Foe?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern California Foothills
Date: 10/23/2019
Time: 12:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hopefully this is an easy one. I am asking you to help identify these little guys. I do not want to miss identity a bug who is helping our cherry tomato plant. These showed up after the plant was established for several months.
Thank you for your time!
How you want your letter signed:  New guy

Immature Large Milkweed Bugs

Dear New guy,
These sure look to us like immature Large Milkweed Bugs and we do not believe they will harm your tomato plants.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Is there any milkweed growing nearby?  They are also sometimes found in association with oleander.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  This had just appeared in our garden 2 weeks ago
Geographic location of the bug:  Wangaratta, north east Victoria
Date: 10/19/2019
Time: 09:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thank you for your site. This bug appeared about 2 weeks ago and has the number has quickly increased since then.
How you want your letter signed:  Michael

Mating Red Banded Seed Eating Bugs

Dear Michael,
We were having trouble identifying your Seed Bugs from the family Lygaeidae, but we did locate a posting in our archives of a Red Banded Seed Eating Bug,
Melanerythrus mactans, from almost ten years ago.  Here is a FlickR image.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia, its range is over most of the continent.

Mating Red Banded Seed Eating Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wheel Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Rutherford County, Middle Tennessee
Date: 10/02/2019
Time: 08:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This year marks my first signing of a living wheel bug, which is very exciting!! Unfortunately, I’ve also found more dead wheel bugs than I’ve seen in my entire life. Do you know if they naturally die after mating/laying eggs or if perhaps the unusual heat is getting them? I’ve been finding them upside down on sidewalks, so I figure they could be overheating there.
How you want your letter signed:  Josie

Wheel Bug

Dear Josie,
Thanks for sending in your image of a Wheel Bug.  Wheel Bugs only survive for one season, and most are probably killed by the first major frost of the year.  We don’t know why you are finding so many dead Wheel Bugs at this time.  We do not believe the heat is a factor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug on driveway
Geographic location of the bug:  Highlands of Rep of Panama,Boquete specifically
Date: 09/28/2019
Time: 10:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please look at this and identify him/her. Suggestion given by neighbours is a harlequin bug but I don’t think so, the ‘leaves’ on the legs don’t seem to be on any photos I looked at for Harlequins.
How you want your letter signed:  Carol

Flag Footed Bug

Dear Carol,
This is a Flag Footed Bug, 
Anisocelis flavolineata.  The species is pictured on Project Noah.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Bug/Beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Central Kentucky
Date: 09/28/2019
Time: 01:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would really appreciate any info about this bug. It was about 2.5 inches and the weirdest thing was that its head moved in an in and out motion like it was vibrating. It also fluttered on the ground but never flew. It did not like light. It was kind of a green/gray color. Ive lived here for ten years and have never seen one before.
How you want your letter signed:  James

Electric Light Bug

Dear James,
The Giant Water Bug or Toe-Biter is also commonly called an Electric Light Bug because they are attracted to electric lights, often in large numbers in areas like outdoor football stadiums.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination