Currently viewing the category: "Ticks"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  North Florida, United States of America
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 11:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I found this crawling on my arm this morning (currently late summer here). I smooshed him a little because I panicked but I’ve never seen him before and cant find a picture that looks like him anywhere. Could you please identify him for me?
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah Sharpe

Tick

Dear Sarah,
This is a blood-sucking Tick, and based on this BugGuide image, we believe it is an American Dog Tick.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found on scrotum
Geographic location of the bug:  Pennsylvania
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 09:38 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify this for me
How you want your letter signed:  Andrew

Blood Engorged Tick

Dear Andrew,
When we read the subject line, we really thought we were going to find an image of a Crab Louse.  We feel for the man who discovered this well fed Tick.  According to BugGuide:  “External parasites of reptiles, birds, and mammals; larvae, nymphs, and adults feed on blood” and “Important vectors of agents of humans & animal disease throughout the world. Ticks transmit the widest variety of pathogens of any blood-sucking arthropod, including bacteria, rickettsiae, protozoa, and viruses. Some currently important human diseases in the US caused by tick-borne pathogens include Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, babesiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, and tick-borne relapsing fever.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  found on back
Geographic location of the bug:  Boise, Idaho
Date: 05/01/2018
Time: 11:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hello, I was sitting in my bed going though my phone when I felt something on my back. I immediately picked this bug off and took a picture. only found one but I am interested in what it’s called.
How you want your letter signed:  Joesph

Tick

Dear Joesph,
Do you have a cat or dog that goes outside?  Were you tramping about in the fields lately?  This is a Tick and here is a BugGuide image of an American Dog Tick for comparison.  Ticks feed on blood.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Some type of tick maybe?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Mississippi
Date: 11/11/2017
Time: 09:23 PM EDT
Hi there, curious what this little guy is. I have had no luck researching on the internet 🙁
How you want your letter signed:  Rob Thompson

Tick

Dear Rob,
This is definitely a Tick, and it resembles this BugGuide image of an American Dog Tick, but we are not certain if that is a correct species identification because it also looks like this image of a Gulf Coast Tick, a species with a more limited range that includes Mississippi.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tick-like bugs Found on chick coop
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix, AZ
Date: 10/01/2017
Time: 02:46 PM EDT
I don’t think/hope these are not ticks especially since they are in groups.  They seek shade when exposed to direct sunlight.  Chicks eat them when the can reach.  Ticks have been found on my dog (who has been bitten;  negative for tick disease).  But what are they and should I be worried since I don’t want to use pesticides with my chickens.
How you want your letter signed:  pj star

Fowl Ticks

Dear pj star,
These sure look like Soft Ticks based on images posted to BugGuide.  According to Everything Poultry:  “The Fowl Tick (
Argas persicus) may be a serious parasite of poultry if it becomes numerous in poultry houses or on poultry ranges. The tick is a blood-sucker, and when present in large numbers it results in weakened birds, reduced egg production, emaciation and even death. The fowl tick is found throughout most of the South and is extremely hardy. Ticks have been kept alive without food for more than three years. The ticks will feed on all fowl.
Fowl ticks spend most of their lives in cracks and hiding places, emerging at night to take a blood meal. Mating takes place in the hiding areas. A few days after feeding, the female lays a batch of eggs. In warm weather the eggs hatch within fourteen days. In cold weather they may take up to three months to hatch. Larvae that hatch from the eggs crawl around until they find a host fowl. They remain attached to the birds for three to ten days. After leaving the birds they find hiding places and molt before seeking another blood meal. This is followed by additional moltings and blood meals.
Ticks are difficult to eradicate and methods employed must be performed carefully. It is not necessary to treat the birds, but houses and surrounding areas must be treated thoroughly.”  There is a nice BioLib image of Argas persicus that looks exactly like your Ticks.

Fowl Ticks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Weird bug in georgia
Geographic location of the bug:  Middle Georgia us
Date: 09/03/2017
Time: 07:56 PM EDT
I’ve never seen a bug that looks like this could you tell me what it is please
How you want your letter signed:  Melissa

Tick

Dear Melissa,
This is definitely a blood-sucking Tick, but its striped legs seem unusual, so we attempted to try a species identification for you.  We started our identification with the Protect Yourself from Ticks page on the UGA Extension site where it states:  “Ticks are one of the most important groups of arthropods in Georgia due to their disease transmitting capabilities. In Georgia, ticks are known to transmit several diseases, with Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Lyme disease being the most common. Tularemia is a long-recognized disease also transmitted by ticks, as are the more recently recognized diseases Anaplasmosis, Human Ehrlichiosis (pronounced err-lick-e-o-sis) and Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness (STARI). Ticks can also cause infections if their mouthparts break off when they are removed from the skin and can leave persistent welts resulting from reactions to their saliva. If tick populations are high in recreation and camping areas, participation may drop off, causing monetary loss to the leisure industry. Costs to control ticks in yards and homes and on pets and people can also be significant.”  The site further elaborates:  “Three tick species are most commonly associated with humans in Georgia: the Lone Star tick(
Amblyomma americanum), American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis) and black-legged tick(Ixodes scapularis).  The Lone Star tick has unusually long mouthparts. The female has a single white spot in the middle of her back, while the white markings on the male are diffuse. Common hosts include large animals such as livestock, dogs, deer and humans as well as smaller animals such as birds and rodents. Lone Star ticks are particularly common in brushy, bottomland areas where deer are prevalent.”  Because of the “single white spot in the middle of her back” we believe your tick is a female Lone Star Tick, but we might be wrong.  The Georgia Department of Health also recognizes the same three common Ticks in Georgia, and states:  “Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americanum) Most common tick in Georgia.  Transmits the bacteria that cause human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) and southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI).”  Despite that information, the striped legs still have our curious.   We did locate images of striped legged Lone Star Ticks including this BugGuide image and this BugGuide image.

Tick

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination