Currently viewing the category: "Thrips"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  narrow striped bug
Geographic location of the bug:  centerville utah USA
Date: 06/29/2019
Time: 12:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i was reading a paper and saw a black speck moving so i pulled out my microscope and saw this. it’s the end of june.
How you want your letter signed:  hunter pitt

Thrips

Dear Hunter,
Thanks for submitting your excellent enlargement of a Thrips (same singular and plural) a tiny insect in the order Thysanoptera generally found in association with plants.  According to BugGuide:  “Thrips can often be found on flowers, they are especially visible on light colored flowers like daisies. Be aware that though they are very tiny, they can give a slightly painful bite.”  Identifying the actually species is beyond our area of expertise.

Thrips

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest Arkansas
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this drawing in my skin after feeling a sting.
I think it came from the yard or garden. It’s very small. Maybe 2mm. Smaller or similar size as an ant.
How you want your letter signed:  Allergic to everything

Thrips, possibly

Dear Allergic to everything,
Because of its small size and general shape, we believe this might be a Thrips.  Here is an image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Thrips can often be found on flowers, they are especially visible on light colored flowers like daisies. Be aware that though they are very tiny, they can give a slightly painful bite.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Los Angeles County
Date: 10/24/2017
Time: 12:58 PM EDT
Greetings,
Looking to identify this insect that we’ve been seeing a lot lately here in Los Angeles. Both at the beach as well as inland in yards. Any idea what it is?
Thank you in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  Kevin

Thrips

Dear Kevin,
These are Thrips in the order Thysanoptera, and the same word is used to name the insect in both singular and plural situations.  According to BugGuide:  “Thrips can often be found on flowers, they are especially visible on light colored flowers like daisies. Be aware that though they are very tiny, they can give a slightly painful bite.”

Thrips

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: These bugs were all over my children and I…
Location: Florida
May 11, 2017 3:06 pm
We live in Florida, Orlando to be exact and I felt so itchy when my son came home from his fathers house in Leesburg Florida. I noticed tiny orange/brown bugs all over my youngest son and I while near our glass sliding door. I don’t know if thy came with my eldest son and they just multiplied once inside… my partner and I thought they were bed bugs because thy were so itchy once they landed on us. We have looked up countless bugs and been on countless websites. They are so small we had to look st them under a microscope… we ended up throwing out mattress out because that’s where I felt them the most, and since then I have not seen any… but I’m sill confused and want to know exactly what they are so if it happens again I can do something about it sooner. Thank you.
Signature: Kay

Thrips

Dear Kay,
You and your family are being bitten by Thrips (same singular and plural), which are small insects found outdoors as most are plant feeders.  According to BugGuide:  “Thrips can often be found on flowers, they are especially visible on light colored flowers like daisies. Be aware that though they are very tiny, they can give a slightly painful bite.”  The bite is not considered dangerous, just painful.  Here is a BugGuide image of Thrips.  Alas, throwing out the mattress was not necessary, but it is always so wonderful to sleep on a new mattress.

Thrips

Oh my goodness thank you so much, we figured that is what they were after searchig for hours online, we do have a lot of plants in the house and around our bed, so no wondering that’s why I was seeing them mainly there. And oh yes the new mattress was the perfect Mother’s Day gift either way ! (: thank you!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
April 27, 2017 5:43 am
I would really appreciate your help, I was sitting in my vehicle with the doors open and kept feeling little bites i then noticed multiple bugs like this one on my arm. The have wings and can jump/fly. I also noticed them on my white vehicle. Can u help identify them?
Signature: Sarah

Thrips

Dear Sarah,
This looks like a Thrips, which is used for both singular and plural.  According to BugGuide:  “Some are wingless; where present, the wings are narrow with few or no veins and fringed with long hairs. Mouthparts asymmetrical (no right mandible), suitable for piercing and sucking. Antennae relatively short, 4- to 9-segmented; tarsi 1-2-segmented, with 1-2 claws and are bladder-like at the end.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB?!
Location: Denver area (larva); east of Phoenix (Thrips & E. acutangulus)
December 12, 2016 10:37 pm
Hello,
I’m trying to positively identify three insects so their Genus species can be part of the file name which will have the Genus species of the flowering plant, too. (You’ll see.)
I’ll include all three images and note that I’m pretty sure I’ve tracked down the fruit fly name, Euarestoides acutangulus, though if you think otherwise, I’m all ears. Or, at least, eyes.
The (I think sawfly) larva is on a pincushion cactus blossom and might be two inches long? This is mid-May along the southern edge of the Denver area (Highland Ranch).
The Thrips is on a Mexican gold poppy, while the fruit fly is on a desert chicory. Both were shot in mid-March, east of Phoenix at about 2,100 feet elevation.
I appreciate your even taking the time to consider these.
Best,
Signature: Mark Bennett

Eschscholzia mexicana Aeolothrips sp. banded thrips Mexican gold poppy

Eschscholzia mexicana
Aeolothrips sp. banded thrips
Mexican gold poppy

Hi Mark,
Thanks for sending the higher resolution files.  We are attaching our cropped version for you to approve.  Based on BugGuide images, we agree that your predatory Thrips is likely in the genus
Aeolothrips.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination