Currently viewing the category: "Stoneflies and Snowflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug
Location: Maine USA
May 28, 2016 7:00 am
My friend took pictures of these bugs and we cannot figure out what they are.
Signature: Emil Falkenberry

Stonefly Exuvia

Stonefly Exuvia

Dear Emil,
These are the Exuviae or cast off exoskeletons of aquatic nymphs of Stoneflies, known as a naiads, so we are guessing these images were taken close to a stream or river.  Of the Stonefly family, BugGuide notes:  ”
nymphs occur primarily under stones in cool unpolluted streams; some species occur along rocky shores of cold lakes, in cracks of submerged logs, and debris that accumulates around stones, branches, and water diversion grills.  spring and summer adults may be found resting on stones and logs in the water, or on leaves and trunks of trees and shrubs near water; winter stoneflies are often attracted to concrete bridges over streams, and some species are commonly found on snow or resting on fence posts during the warmer days of late winter.”  Though we cannot be certain of the species, your images resemble the Exuviae of the Beautiful Stone, 
Paragnetina immarginata, which is pictured on BugGuide.  Since one of your images appears to be up-side-down, we are guessing they may have been taken on a bridge overhang.

Stonefly Exuviae

Stonefly Exuviae

Thank you so much and yes they were under a bridge by water.  🙂  Have a great weekend.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?!
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
May 10, 2016 7:51 pm
Hi Bugman,
I live in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and I found a very interesting bug today and I need help identifying it!
Any help you can give me would be wonderful! Thank you!
Signature: Taylor

Salmonfly

Salmonfly

Dear Taylor,
This is a Giant Stonefly or Salmonfly in the genus
Pteronarcys, an insect generally found close to water as the nymphs are aquatic.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Upstate South Carolina
April 14, 2016 6:55 pm
Dear bugman,
This lovely creature flew up to me and said hello and I have never seen like it before!
I would love to know what it is so that I can educate myself further 🙂
Thank you mucho,
Best,
Kate
Signature: Keep Learning! -Bugman

Giant Stonefly

Giant Stonefly

Dear Kate,
This is a Giant Stonefly in the genus Pteronarcys, and there are several possible species that are found along the eastern seaboard.  You can browse through the images on BugGuide for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help with ID
Location: Rhode Island, USA
April 4, 2016 8:24 am
Hi Bugman,
I found about ten of these clinging to the outside of my house at the end of February (unseasonably warm day). Can you help identify?
Thanks!
Signature: jkayman

Stonefly

Stonefly

Dear jkayman,
This is a harmless Stonefly.  They are generally found not far from a stream or river.  Additionally, according to BugGuide:  “nymphs of most spp. develop in cool, well-oxygenated water and do not tolerate pollution; therefore, their presence is an indicator of good water quality, and their absence in areas where they previously occurred may indicate pollution.”

Thank you very much Daniel.  I do indeed live by a river.
Appreciate it.
John

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect
Location: Maple Ridge, British Columbia
March 26, 2016 5:23 pm
I was working outside at a mill and we are situated along side the Fraser River. I always see strange bugs like the one pictured.
I’m trying to figure out what this insect is called.
I found it March 26th 2016( today)
The bug barely moved.I picked the bug up with a stick because the underside of his body was yellow. and I wanted to get a picture of it. The bug had a good grip.
I assumed it was just getting out of hibernation, as spring is upon us now.
I tried google image search, the result was dobsonfly, alderfly or fishfly.
Is this bug any of those three?
Signature: Corinne

Ebony Salmonfly, we believe

Ebony Salmonfly, we believe

Dear Corinne,
Though it resembles a Dobsonfly, Alderfly or a Fishfly in the Order Megaloptera, your insect is actually a Giant Stonefly in the genus
Pteronarcys, commonly called a Salmonfly.  A comment posted to this BugGuide image indicates it is possibly the Ebony Salmonfly, Pteronarcys princeps, and the coloring matches your individual, but as the commentor indicates “two species here in CA and you need to see the naughty bits to tell them apart”, we cannot be certain of the species.  BugGuide lists British Columbia as a sighting location for the Ebony Salmonfly.

Probably Ebony Salmonfly

Probably Ebony Salmonfly

Ebony Salmonfly, we presume

Ebony Salmonfly, we presume

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: help with this bug
Location: Oakville , Ontario , Canada
February 17, 2016 9:41 am
I saw many of these bugs in the snow , sorry this is not the best of photos , this one had blue hue on its lower body , a couple of others had a brown hue , may be male , female , they were abut one centimetre in length , never seen them before , I was close to water in the harbour
Signature: Stewart

Snowfly

Snowfly

Dear Stewart,
Congratulations on your Snowfly or Small Winter Stonefly sighting.  Small Winter Snowflies are in the family Capniidae, and the exact genus and species might be difficult to identify conclusively and according to BugGuide:  “many species are restricted to relatively small areas.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “nymphs [are found] beneath rocks and gravel on the bottom of streams and rivers; adults often seen on snow, or resting on concrete bridges over streams.”  They cannot survive in polluted conditions, so the presence of Snowflies is an indication that the water in the area is pure.  The blue coloration in your individual is quite interesting and unnatural looking, resembling a digital imaging aberration much more than it does the natural coloration of any Snowfly image we have seen.  BugGuide also has many images of Snowflies in the snow.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination