Currently viewing the category: "Stoneflies and Snowflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: South BC bug, similar to the insect image on your website
Location: South BC
August 19, 2017 6:29 am
Hi there Bugman,
My mate found this insect in the river in south BC.
I’ve been looking everywhere online to find out what this insect is. Not much result! However, the closest thing that has come up is the picture on your website right under “TOP TEN” on the left side bar.
Could you please tell us what it is?
Thanks mucho and much bug love!
Sway
Signature: Bugman

Stonefly Naiad

The image on our homepage is an Earwig, and though your creature shares some similarities, they are not closely related.  Your insect is an aquatic nymph, the naiad of a Stonefly.   Your individual looks very similar to this BugGuide image submitted from Alberta, Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Aquatic bug?!
Location: Glacial river, base of mt Rainier
July 31, 2017 8:24 pm
Hello! We were out playing in a very cold glacial river at the base of Mt Rainier in Washington state and came across these guys today. There were hundreds of them on rocks in the water, but only a few this sprawled out and large outside the water.
Signature: Alexa

Stonefly Exuvia

Dear Alexa,
Your images document two different, unrelated aquatic insects.  The image of the one “sprawled out and large outside the water” is actually the exuvia or cast-off exoskeleton of a Stonefly, and the “hundreds of them on rocks in the water” are Caseworms, the larvae or naiads of Caddisflies.  Larval Caddisflies are known as Caseworms and according to BugGuide:  “Most species live in a mobile case constructed from plant material, algae, grains of sand, pieces of snail shells, or entirely of silk. The case is held together with strands of silk secreted by the larva. In some species the case is attached to a rock, log, or other underwater surface; a few species have no case and are free-living.”  The cases on your individuals appear to be constructed using grains of sand or small pebbles.

Caseworms: Caddisfly Naiads

Caseworms: Caddisfly Naiads

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fish fly?
Location: Minnesota
May 30, 2017 9:49 pm
Hi!
I’ve found 3 of these in the last 3 days in my home and am wondering what they are. They’re roughly 2.5″ black and gray with multiple sets of wings. They’re quite loud when they fly and quick on their feet. I do live next to a river and have seen them outside but this is the first time I’ve seen them in my home.
Signature: DJ

Stonefly

Dear DJ,
This is not a Fishfly.  It looks more to us like a Stonefly, another insect with an aquatic nymph that is found near water.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Bracklinn Falls, Callander, Scotland, UK
May 27, 2017 6:35 am
Hi there.
My friend saw this bug while out walking and was wondering what exactly it is. I think it looks like some sort of earwig or mantis but I honestly have no idea. It has six legs, medium-long antenna at the back and short ones at the front, black and white with stripes on its back and it doesn’t appear to have wings. It’s currently Summer and I believe it was around the Bracklinn Falls area in Callander.
Signature: Lauren Pearson

Stonefly Exuvia

Dear Lauren,
We are surmising that Bracklinn Falls means a waterfall on a stream or river.  This is the exuvia or cast-off exoskeleton of a Stonefly, an aquatic nymph that eventually develops into a winged adult.  Here is a FlickR image of a Scottish Stonefly nymph and here is an image of an adult Stonefly from Encyclopedia of Life.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pictures of bug upon awakening….
Location: Fredericksburg Va
May 19, 2017 11:31 pm
This bug was on my pillow on Wednesday the 5th of May….a bit after a biblical 3 days straight downpour in Fredericksburg Virginia…It was on my pillow above my ear ……………………..
I think it was bigger than an an inch but smaller than an inch and a half.
I’d really like to know what it was…………
Signature: susan warner

Stonefly

Dear Susan,
This is some species of Stonefly in the order Plectoptera.  We wish you had been able to attach an in focus image of the entire insect as that would help us with identification.  This BugGuide image of a member of the genus
Isoperia, and this BugGuide image of Taenionema atlanticum both look similar to your individual.  Do you live near a stream or river?  The larvae of Stoneflies are aquatic, and they are f0und in fresh water.

Stonefly

the photo in BugGuide looks exactly like the fellow on my pillow….thanx.  I live near the Rappahanock River hence a freshwater source.  I have hand tremors and now have real trouble getting a well focused photograph…. but now it’s hard to get an in focus shot. Curses!

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: UFO
Location: Massachusetts
May 16, 2017 1:44 pm
Found these crawling all over my house today. I live just south of Boston. There were tons of them, about a half inch long excluding antennae.
Signature: Hoping it’s harmless

Small Winter Stonefly

Dear Hoping it’s harmless,
It is.  This is a Small Winter Stonefly in the family Capniidae.  According to BugGuide:  “adults emerge from November to June (most common in winter and early spring).”  Do you live near a stream?  According to BugGuide:  “nymphs beneath rocks and gravel on the bottom of streams and rivers; adults often seen on snow, or resting on concrete bridges over streams.”  Since they are only found near very clean, well oxygenated water, their presence is a sign that the local water is not polluted.

Small Winter Stonefly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination