Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This spider jumped out at me on the trail.
Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 11:15 AM
I was hiking in Arizona just south of the Grand Canyon in the Kaibab National Forest when this spider ran out into the trail, front legs in the air and jumped around for a bit. The spider was about 2 1/2 inches long. I let him put his threatening display on for a bit, and snapped this picture. I love how the spider blends in with the sticks on the ground.
Sirena
About 15 miles south of Grandview Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon, Arizona

Spider in Arizona

Spider in Arizona

Hi Sirena,
We are going to try to identify your spider and may seek assistance. We love your photo and hope to have a proper identity for you very soon. We are entertaining the possibility that this might be a Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.

Daniel:
Sorry to be late in replying….
The “threatening spider” from Arizona is a harmless wolf spider, family Lycosidae, probably in the genus Hogna.
Eric Eaton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this bug?
Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 3:03 AM
Found this bug drying out on a brick in the Mazzaron region of Spain after a rain shower. Was wondering if you could identify.
William
Mazzaron, Spain

Female Wolf Spider with Egg Sac from Spain

Female Wolf Spider with Egg Sac from Spain

Hi William,
This is a female Wolf Spider, but we are not certain of the species.  Female Wolf Spiders drag their egg sacs around with them and once the spiderlings hatch, the mother spider will carry the young on her back for several days until they disperse.  This care method probably has the advantage of distributing the spiderlings in a larger area because of the mobility of the adult.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Sadly I found this spider dead in our swimming pool skimmer. When I looked closely I found that there were many tiny baby spiders clinging to the mother. I was surprised that they were able to survive. Can you tell me what kind of spider this is and do you think the young spiders can survive?
Kathy

Hi Again Kathy,
Your spider is a Wolf Spider. The mother often carries the spiderlings on her back for several days to weeks. Though they survived the drowning, there are many perils awaiting young spiderlings, so they will not all survive, but some surely will.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination