Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
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Shiny purple wasp with wolf spider for thanksgiving feast!!!
December 13, 2009
Hi,
My family went camping over Thanksgiving this year and while we were sitting around the campfire I saw this wasp. It was searching for the wolf spider that it had paralyzed. When it finally found the spider it tried to drag it up the side of the fire ring. The spider was too heavy, and the wasp kept slipping back down. I got the wasp to drag its prey on to a stick and then took them both out of our campsite. The wasp was about an inch long, with shiny black wings and a metallic purple-blue body. The spider was also about an inch long, had two dark brown spots on its head and three on its abdomen, and brown spots on the underside of its abdomen. Do you know what species these are? Thanks,
Josh Kouri

Blue Black Spider Wasp and Prey

Blue Black Spider Wasp and Prey

Hi Josh,
You normally write from Oklahoma, but you didn’t indicate if your camping trip was elsewhere.  We believe this is a Blue Black Spider Wasp, Anoplius depressipes, which, according to BugGuide, has been reported from nearby Arkansas.

Blue Black Spider Wasp and Prey

We will contact Eric Eaton to see if he can confirm this identification.

Sorry,
We were camping at Robber’s Cave State Park, which is in southeast Oklahoma.
Josh

Blue Black Spider Wasp and Prey

Update from Eric Eaton
Hi, Daniel:
Great images indeed!  I agree that this is a spider wasp in the genus Anoplius, but not Anoplius depressipes, which preys mostly on fishing spiders.  The prey here is a wolf spider of some kind, family Lycosidae.
Eric

Comment July 22, 2014
Subject: Blue Black Spider Wasp
July 22, 2014 6:47 pm
This site is a WONDERFUL resource!
I was working outside in my yard in Lacey, WA, when I saw what appeared to be a spider trying to catch a shiny blue-black flying insect in its web.  As I watched with fascination, I wondered why this bug wasn’t getting caught on the web no matter how frenzied the movements of the spider.  Then it became obvious the spider was either killed or paralyzed and the bug swiftly removed the spider’s body from it’s legs and took the body down into a crack in the rocks.  I didn’t have time to get my camera.  Drat!
I ran in the house to find out what this insect is.  What’sthatbug.com had great photos of my killer insect via a post titled: Blue Black Spider Wasp with prey, December 16, 2009 · By Josh Kouri
Thank you,
Lisa Wilson
Signature: Lisa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this a wolf spider with spiderlings?
August 31, 2009
I was wondering what kind of spider this is. You don’t have very many wolf spiders and I can’t seem to find one that looks like this. We found her in our pool. We see two or three of these spiders a week in our inground pool. She was still alive when I took the picture and the babies were too. I tried to compare the spider with other wolf spiders, but they do not look like this. Is she floating on her back with her babies on the bottom of her abdomen?
Melissa Spencer
Tuscaloosa, AL

Drowned Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Drowned Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Hi Melissa,
This is a female Wolf Spider with Spiderlings.  Sadly, she appears to have drowned in the swimming pool, but luckily, her body is providing a raft for her Spiderlings, so she is still caring for them after death.  We actually have numerous images of Wolf Spiders on our site, but they have not been subclassified since our site migration almost a year ago.  Just last weekend we completed the subcategorization of the archived Caterpillar images, and that took hours.  We need to go through all of our Spider archived postings and further subcategorize them into Fishing Spiders, Orbweavers, Jumping Spiders, Wolf Spiders and others.  For now, you can view them using our awesome in site search engine or you may just view the uncategorized Spiders.  We hope our reply reached you in time, or that your rescued the living Spiderlings before getting our response.  Unfortunately, the backyard swimming pool is a death trap for countless insects.  In Southern California, we frequently receive images of drowned male California Trapdoor Spiders that have stumbled into the pool in search of a mate.

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Egg sack carrying yellow spider – Manitoba
August 31, 2009
Hello. The enclosed photos are of a lovely spider we encountered on our walk on the boardwalk over Ominik Marsh, in Clear Lake, Manitoba.
It was about 1 inch long, yellowy, and as you can see it was carrying an egg sack (we think), and had either some sort of parasite or baby spiders on it as well – the red things.
Hope you can help with the ID. Thank you for your time, and congrats on the book.
M.M.
Ominik Marsh, Clear Lake, Manitoba, Canada

Wolf Spider with Eggsac and Mites

Wolf Spider with Eggsac and Mites

Dear M.M.,
This is a female Wolf Spider and she is carrying her eggsac.  Additionally, she is transporting some red mites on her body.  There are some Mites that are phoretic, and use larger arthropods for transportation purposes only, but we suspect your photo shows Mites in the genus Leptus and that genus is parasitic based on some BugGuide images.  We of course would welcome an expert opinion on this matter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wolf Spider and Young?
Thu, Mar 26, 2009 at 3:12 PM
Saw this spider last year when I lived in Oklahoma. These are the only two photos that I could get before it went into deeper into the weeds. Is this a Wolf Spider with her young?
D.B.Ramsey
Claremore OK

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear D.B.Ramsey,
Your photo illustrates typical maternal behavior of a female Wolf Spider caring for her spiderlings.  The Wolf Spider drags her egg sac around and when the spiderlings hatch, they climb on the mother’s back for several days, eventually dispersing.  This behavior is protective as well as an aid to assisting the spiderlings in their dispersal.  As they drop off the mother spider individually or in small groups, they will not be competing with one another for food.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mother spider and spiderlings
Fri, Dec 5, 2008 at 9:35 AM
Dear bugman,
please help identify this family. Actual length of the body was approximately 2cm. She was very cooperative when I took her home to take a proper photograph and generally stood still. Of course I put them back when I was done. The original high-resolution picture with geographic coordinates and link to another version taken from a different angle was contributed to Wikimedia Commons ( http://commons.wikimedia.org/ wiki/Image:Mother-spider-and- spiderlings-0a.jpg )
Thank you in advance for your time and effort!
Best regards, Adamantios
Thrace, Greece

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Hi Adamantios,
Though we cannot provide an exact species, this is most definitely a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae.  The female Wolf Spider will drag her egg sac around until the spiderlings hatch.  She then carries the spiderlings on her back for several days until they disperse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This spider jumped out at me on the trail.
Tue, Nov 18, 2008 at 11:15 AM
I was hiking in Arizona just south of the Grand Canyon in the Kaibab National Forest when this spider ran out into the trail, front legs in the air and jumped around for a bit. The spider was about 2 1/2 inches long. I let him put his threatening display on for a bit, and snapped this picture. I love how the spider blends in with the sticks on the ground.
Sirena
About 15 miles south of Grandview Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon, Arizona

Spider in Arizona

Spider in Arizona

Hi Sirena,
We are going to try to identify your spider and may seek assistance. We love your photo and hope to have a proper identity for you very soon. We are entertaining the possibility that this might be a Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.

Daniel:
Sorry to be late in replying….
The “threatening spider” from Arizona is a harmless wolf spider, family Lycosidae, probably in the genus Hogna.
Eric Eaton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination