Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wolf Spiders ”R” Us

Wolf Spiderling

Wolf Spiders ”R” Us
Location: East Moline, IL
December 15, 2010 11:58 am
As an amateur arachnologist, I have been keeping native wolf spiders for the last two years. I found four female wolf spiders in my back yard this year, and three of them produced egg sacs. Unfortunately, only one egg sac was viable and now I have a nice selection of Hogna helluo spiderlings. I thought you might like to see one of my little darlings, as I haven’t found anyone who keeps Wolf Spiders with the obsession of myself. Once these are raised to near adulthood, I will release them back into the wild. Sorry for the poor quality of the pictures, I’m hoping Santa will bring me a better camera this year.
Signature: Ron DePaepe

Wolf Spiderling

Dear Ron,
You are our new hero.  Thank you so much for providing our readership with the opportunity to read about your endeavor to assist nature to sustain a robust population of native Wolf Spiders in your vicinity.  We also hope that Santa brings you a better camera.

Wolf Spiderling

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

wolf or grass spider?
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
November 9, 2010 11:56 am
Hi Bugman,
I’m trying to get a definitive ID on this spider with spiderlings. I took it this summer (2010) at the Nature Center where I work. I’d like to include it in a presentation I’m working on.
It matches some photos I’ve seen of wolf spiders, and I know that wolf spiders carry their spiderlings, but it doesn’t have the really big eyes that I think of as typical for them. Maybe it’s a grass spider? Or something else?
I love your site–I look at it every day!
Thanks for all you do!
Signature: Curious spider fan

Rabid Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Hi Curious spider fan,
This maternal behavior is consistent with Wolf Spiders and not Grass Spiders which look somewhat similar.  We believe this is a female Rabid Wolf Spider,
Rabidosa rabida, and you can compare your specimen with the images posted to Bugguide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wolf Spider – Att: Daniel
Location: Mid-Missouri
November 2, 2010 10:41 am
I found this wolf spider this weekend in my yard. It was fairly large and I would guess the body length to be about an inch with overall length (with legs) to be in the 2 inch range. He was very friendly (as most all wolf spiders I come across are). One of these days I’m going to get the nerve to let one walk on my hand….yesterday wasn’t that day though.
I have searched and searched for an ID and can not get farther than the Lycosidae Family. I have not seen this species before and most I come accross are Rabidosa or Pardosa. Hopefully you can give me some help to nail it down to a species or even genus.
Signature: Nathanael Siders

Wolf Spider

Hi Nathanael,
We scanned through the Wolf Spider images on BugGuide, and we believe your lovely Wolf Spider might be
Gladicosa pulchra.  The markings resemble the markings on this image on BugGuide, and the face is a dead ringer for this image on BugGuide.

Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cyprus Arachnid
Location: Latchi, Cyprus
October 29, 2010 3:54 am
I sent you a photo of a spider a couple of days ago but have since been given two more of the same one which I think would greatly help you in identifying our ’illegal immigrant’. We are just very sceptical over this spider being native to this Island. He was about 5-6cm large. Any Idea which species it is and where it originally comes from? We’re all a little stumped! Thank you! 🙂
Signature: Alex P

Wolf Spider from Cyprus

Hi Alex,
Because your photos included a head on view of this spider, we are able to determine that it is a Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae based on the arrangement of the eyes.  You can verify our findings on BugGuide.  Wolf Spiders might bite if they are carelessly handled, but the bite of a Wolf Spider is not considered to be dangerous.  We are uncertain of the species, but we suspect this is a local species for you.

Wolf Spider from Cyprus

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider (Huntsman?) in Lusaka, Zambia
Location: Lusaka, Zambia
October 21, 2010 4:11 am
Dear Bugman,
last night (around 8pm., 2 hours after sunset) I almost stepped on this spider (body size appr. 3.5 cm / 1.4 inches), which was sitting on the grass in our garden. We are located in the city of Lusaka, Zambia (Southern Africa). Currently it is dry season with the rainy season approaching.
The spider did not move for the entire time I took from discovering it to fetching the camera and taking some photos (with flash). Also placing my slipper next to it for size comparison did not make it move.
Any hints are greatly appreciated. Thank you very much in advance!
Signature: Spider-Illiterate

Possibly Wolf Spider

Dear Spider-Illiterate,
In our opinion, this appears to be a Wolf Spider, but we are not certain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mama Mia
Location:  Coryell County, Central Texas
October 11, 2010 10:00 pm
Found this large spider in the garage. Live and let live, but I prefer large arachnids to live freely outside. Silly, I know, but that’s just how it is. Was going to nickname it ”Bruce” until I noticed all the spiderlings on her back. Took a couple of quick photos, and of course this was at night and I had to use the flash, sorry. I noticed that a couple of spiderlings were jumping ship, and promptly set them all free in the garden. May they live long and prosper.
Are they Rabidosa rabida? I looked up wolf spiders on a university website.
Signature:  Ellen

Rabid Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Ellen,
We concur that this appears to be a Rabid Wolf Spider, a harmless species with an unfortunate name.  We slightly adjusted the levels and darkened your images a bit and the detail is quite exceptional.

Rabid Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination