Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject —
Wolf or Trapdoor
Geographic location of the bug —
Montgomery, Al
Date: 09/28/2017
Time: 06:18 PM EDT
Hi: I am sending two pics of what I believe are the same spieces of spider. One of the spiders is, what I think to be, quite a unique color. I stupidly forgot to put a coin by that one, however, it was just slightly bigger than the second spider. Both spiders were discovered dead. One was being drug by a spider wasp. We have had a bumper crop of spiders this year. They seem to have exploded along with the record breaking rain in our area. Thank you for checking my photos and I am very curious about the one with the blue abdomen.
How you want your letter signed:  Kathy

Wolf Spider

Dear Kathy,
These are not Trapdoor Spiders, and we concur that they are probably Wolf Spiders and the same species or at least genus. 

Wolf Spider

Update Courtesy of a comment from Michael
Michael identified these as members of the Wolf Spider genus
Tigrosa, and based on this BugGuide image and this BugGuide image, we would grade his as Correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Niagara Falls, Ontario
Date: 09/25/2017
Time: 12:06 PM EDT
What is this wasp dragging a spider across the deck? The iridescent blue wings and striped body, rusty colored legs and eyes are beautiful. It was very fast but I was able to get a very short video of it.
How you want your letter signed:  Dawn

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Dawn,
This is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and female members of the family hunt and paralyze Spider to feed to the developing brood.  Your species,
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, does not have a species specific common name.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are often found taking nectar from flowers (Daucus, Pastinaca, and Eryngium). Females provision nests mainly with Lycosids” meaning the Spider in your image is most likely a Wolf Spider.

Spider Wasp and Prey

Thank you Daniel. It is extraordinary that you replied so quickly and it is much appreciated. I will write a short story for the Bert Miller Nature Club’s fall Rambler newsletter and give reference to What’s That Bug and the information you provided.
Sincerely,
Dawn Pierrynowski

Spider Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Why is this spider pink?
Geographic location of the bug:  Loveland, Colorado
Date: 09/23/2017
Time: 11:33 PM EDT
I cannot find anything about why this wolf spider is pink? I found it today shoveling dirt in my yard.
I have several pictures if you’d like more.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Angelina

Wolf Spider

Dear Angelina,
We are pretty sure your Wolf Spider is a Carolina Wolf Spider,
Hogna carolinensis, a species that can be highly variable in color.  Individuals found in desert areas are frequently light or white in color like this BugGuide posting from Arizona or this BugGuide posting from Utah, and this individual posted to BugGuide from Montana is also white.  We would love to see additional images, especially a ventral view.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Cordes-Sur-Ciel, Southern France
Date: 09/19/2017
Time: 01:21 AM EDT
Hi Mr Bugman,
I saw this on my patio yesterday, I’ve never seen anything like it. A friend tells me it is a Wolf spider, carrying her babies, is this correct?
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Curly

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Curly,
Your friend is correct.  This is a female Wolf Spider with her brood of spiderlings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Joshua Tree Spider
Location: Joshua Tree, CA
July 25, 2017 5:25 pm
Please help me identify this greyish spider that’s about the size of an open hand.
Signature: Matt

Wolf Spider

Dear Matt,
This looks like a large Wolf Spider, but we are not certain of the genus or species.  Wolf Spiders are hunting spiders that do not build webs.  Despite their large size, they are harmless.  We are going to attempt to contact Mandy Howe to see if she can provide a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Wasp
Location: Near Pittsburgh PA
July 11, 2017 4:51 am
I’m pretty sure this a spider wasp (Pompilidae) of some sort, but I hope that you can tell what variety.
Signature: Terry M

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Terry,
Based on BugGuide images, we are pretty confident your Spider Wasp is
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, and of the genus, BugGuide states:  “Adults are often found taking nectar from flowers (Daucus, Pastinaca, and Eryngium). Females provision nests mainly with Lycosids.”  Based on that information, the prey is most likely a Wolf Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination