Currently viewing the category: "Wolf Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Why is this spider pink?
Geographic location of the bug:  Loveland, Colorado
Date: 09/23/2017
Time: 11:33 PM EDT
I cannot find anything about why this wolf spider is pink? I found it today shoveling dirt in my yard.
I have several pictures if you’d like more.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Angelina

Wolf Spider

Dear Angelina,
We are pretty sure your Wolf Spider is a Carolina Wolf Spider,
Hogna carolinensis, a species that can be highly variable in color.  Individuals found in desert areas are frequently light or white in color like this BugGuide posting from Arizona or this BugGuide posting from Utah, and this individual posted to BugGuide from Montana is also white.  We would love to see additional images, especially a ventral view.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Cordes-Sur-Ciel, Southern France
Date: 09/19/2017
Time: 01:21 AM EDT
Hi Mr Bugman,
I saw this on my patio yesterday, I’ve never seen anything like it. A friend tells me it is a Wolf spider, carrying her babies, is this correct?
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Curly

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Curly,
Your friend is correct.  This is a female Wolf Spider with her brood of spiderlings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Joshua Tree Spider
Location: Joshua Tree, CA
July 25, 2017 5:25 pm
Please help me identify this greyish spider that’s about the size of an open hand.
Signature: Matt

Wolf Spider

Dear Matt,
This looks like a large Wolf Spider, but we are not certain of the genus or species.  Wolf Spiders are hunting spiders that do not build webs.  Despite their large size, they are harmless.  We are going to attempt to contact Mandy Howe to see if she can provide a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Wasp
Location: Near Pittsburgh PA
July 11, 2017 4:51 am
I’m pretty sure this a spider wasp (Pompilidae) of some sort, but I hope that you can tell what variety.
Signature: Terry M

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Terry,
Based on BugGuide images, we are pretty confident your Spider Wasp is
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, and of the genus, BugGuide states:  “Adults are often found taking nectar from flowers (Daucus, Pastinaca, and Eryngium). Females provision nests mainly with Lycosids.”  Based on that information, the prey is most likely a Wolf Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this spider?
Location: Aiken, SC
July 9, 2017 2:10 pm
I suffer from extreme arachnophobia. My husband sent me this picture of a spider living in our storage building. My first instinct was to tell him to kill it with fire; but cooler heads prevailed and he just left it alone. I’m afraid that it is venomous and will have lots of little venomous babies in our building and the building and everything in it will have to be transferred to the ownership of the spider.
Signature: Arachnophobe Angie

Wolf Spider

Dear Angie,
This is a Wolf Spider, and we suppose it would make no difference to an arachnophobe, but Wolf Spiders are not considered dangerous to humans.  They are hunting spiders that do not build webs, so it is doubtful it will remain in one location very long.

Thank you so much for your reply! Although I am still terrified of it, it’s great to know it’s not actually a danger.
Thank you again!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huntsman Spider?
Location: Nashville, TN
June 29, 2017 9:02 pm
Just curious if this is a huntsman spider
Signature: Spider Identification

Fishing Spider, we believe

Your image detail is not ideal for exact species identification, but we are certain that this is NOT a Huntsman Spider.  We believe it is a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, but we would not rule out that it might be a Wolf Spider like this Thin-Legged Wolf Spider pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination