Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Rare spider?
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
July 1, 2017 4:09 pm
Found this on my doorstep in Atanta, Georgia at night in the summer. (I moved it to a safer place where it was less likely to be noticed by a neighbor and killed).
Signature: Chris

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Dear Chris,
We have not done any recent research on the Red Legged Purseweb Spider, but last we were aware, the species was considered endangered.  Your individual looks emaciated, and he might have benefited from a meal like a nice fat cricket.  We found this information on Animal Diversity Web:  “Red-legged purseweb spiders, although scarcely found in nature, are not listed on any conservation lists. (Reichling, et al., 2011).”  According to University of Kentucky Entomology:  “The Red-Legged Purseweb Spider (Sphodros rufipes, which may occur in Kentucky) has historically appeared on U.S. endangered species lists, but some scientists believe that it may not be a rare spider. ”  Because of your kind actions, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Spider
Location: Georgetown, California
June 3, 2017 11:05 am
Hello,
A few days ago my sister brought me a spider to identify. She lives in a wooded area above Georgetown, Ca. She thought it was a tarantula and I thought it was a wolf spider. **I did not kill the spider** It escaped the container it was in and I found her(?) body today. I had originally wanted my sister to take her(?) back to the mountain area where originally found. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
Signature: Jen

Tarantula

Hi Jen,
This looks to us like a male Tarantula.  We suspect your sister encountered him when he was searching for a mate.  Male Tarantulas are much shorter lived than females.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trap Door Spider
Location: Central NC
May 29, 2017 4:47 pm
Photo to go with my comment on
2004/07/03/trapdoor-spider-in-north-carolina/
Signature: Laura Wolf

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Laura,
Thanks for sending in your image of a male Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Ummidia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Identification
Location: Witbank, Mpumalanga, South Africa
May 5, 2017 10:58 am
Hi.
Found this little big man on my doorstep while sitting outside in the dark. Just caught my eye, needless to say I got a terrible fright!
His back seems to have a “smiley face” on.
Would love to know what’s it called and if poisonous, but I really doubt it.
Thank you
Nataly Oosthuizen
Witbank, Mpumalanga
South Africa
Signature: N Oosthuizen

Tarantula

Dear N Oosthuizen,
The best we are able to provide at this time is that this is a Tarantula, but we don’t know the species.  Tarantulas have venom but most are not aggressive and they are not considered a threat to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Costa Rica
Location: Pozos de Santa Ana, Costa Rica
May 4, 2017 7:02 pm
This spider is about the size of my thumb, and wandering about in our garage like it does not have a care in the world, or it just had its third martini. We have tarantulas, but I have not seen one (yet) with a white strip on its abdomen.
Signature: Family Pura Vida

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Family Pura Vida,
This is definitely a member of the infraorder Mygalomorphae, the group that contains primitive spiders including Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders.  It seems small for a Tarantula, so we are guessing this is a male Trapdoor Spider out searching for a mate.  We have an image in our archive of a male Trapdoor Spider from North Carolina with similar markings.

Trapdoor Spider

Perfect!  That is the same answer we got from a local source. Hebestatis lanthanus to be exact. We are relocating “him” from our house to a nice forest dwelling (with nice ground cover) nearby. Thank you!!!

Thanks so much for providing a species name for us.  We are linking to both FlickR and Arachids My Species that have images of Hebestatis lanthanus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible trapdoor spider?
Location: Eastern Kentucky
April 11, 2017 2:29 pm
I was pulling up clumps of ornamental grass from a raised bed and noticed a white “sack” that came up on the roots of one clump. There was a tear on one side of the sack and I could see a large, dark, shiny spider inside. While I was trying to figure out what to do about it, I noticed tiny spiders crawling out of the sack. (The second image shows them.) I’m assuming they were her babies. I left her there with the youngsters while I finished cleaning the raised bed. When I came back, she had crawled out of the nest and was walking across the deck. I encouraged her to move where she wouldn’t be stepped on and put the clump of grass and nest beside her. I went back later, but she was nowhere to be seen. I’ve checked the images here on whatsthatbug and I think she’s a trapdoor spider.
Signature: Kentucky Gin

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Kentucky Gin,
We agree that this is a Trapdoor Spider, probably a female Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Ummidia based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Dig tunnel in ground and seal with a silk-hinged lid. They hide under this lid and make forays out when prey is sensed, presumably by vibration. Males are often found wandering in late spring, presumably looking for mates.”  Because of your gentle kindness in relocating this little lady, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider with Spiderlings

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination