Currently viewing the category: "Tarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tarantula
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern utah, desert area
Date: 10/20/2017
Time: 06:36 PM EDT
My dad came across this spider at the mine where he works. It was on a piece of machinery.
How you want your letter signed:  Up to you

Tarantula

This is indeed a Tarantula.  The only species reported from Utah on BugGuide is Aphonopelma iodius.

Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  East Texas Arachnid
Geographic location of the bug:  East Texas
Date: 10/10/2017
Time: 11:29 AM EDT
Greetings! Long-time reader and fellow entomomaniac here. I have a friend who found this fellow around her home in East Texas in September. I’ll admit that my arachnid knowledge is lacking; my best guess was that it was a juvenile tarantula that had recently molted, but that’s as far as I’ve gotten. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!
How you want your letter signed:  Dani Gardner

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Dani,
This is not a Tarantula, but it is a Trapdoor Spider that is classified along with Tarantulas as a primitive spider in the infraorder Mygalomorphae. We will attempt to provide you with a species identification.

Daniel,
Sounds good! Thank you very much for your help!
Dani

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dead spiders in my pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Killeen, Texas
Date: 10/07/2017
Time: 05:48 PM EDT
Found it dead in the pool. Just curious what it is and if me and my guests need to worry. Legs outstretched it was about 4″ from… toe to toe? And torso was around 1.75″ long.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Male Trapdoor Spider

Dear Mike,
This is a male Trapdoor Spider, probably in the genus
Ummidia, and they are not aggressive.  Male Trapdoor Spiders wander in search of a mate and males are frequently found drowned in pools.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Ilhabela,SP – Brazil
Date: 10/03/2017
Time: 10:43 PM EDT
Whats that spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Antonio Prado

Tarantula

Dear Antonio,
This is a Tarantula.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown large spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Sierra Nevada foothills
Date: 09/30/2017
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Could you tell me what this spider is?
How you want your letter signed:  Jesse

Tarantula

Dear Jesse,
This Tarantula might be
Aphonopelma eutylenum, a species found in California and represented on BugGuide.  This Reddit image is described as a “California Ebony Tarantula (Aphonopelma eutylenum).”

Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Location:  Westridge Park, California
August 26, 2017 12:13 pm
Running with my dog in Westridge Park and almost stepped on this big harry guy!
Signature:  Sharon

California Tarantula

Dear Sharon,
This is a Tarantula, and you are in California, making this a California Tarantula, an unofficial name for members of the genus
Aphonopelma, the only North American genus of Tarantulas known west of the Mississippi River.  See BugGuide for more on the genus, including this information on identification:  “The Aphonopelma of North American are poorly known. Although many species have been described few specimens can be properly identified either by using available keys or by wading through species descriptions. Most identifiable specimens belong to species found in Mexico or Central America that are easily recognized by unique color patterns, such as that of A. seemanni. Correct identification of specimens collected within the United States is often suspect since determinations must be based on the process of elimination using collection dates and locality data in combination with coloration, coxal setation, and metatarsal scopulation.”

Are they as dangerous as their reputation?  Could Finn or I get bit/stung and could it cause issues?  Thanks What’s That Bug for 15 years of awesome knowledge and assistance:)
Sharon

Tarantulas are reluctant to bite, but should one decide to bite, it might be painful and might produce a local reaction.  The venom is not considered dangerous, however, Tarantulas do have urticating hairs that could cause an irritation.  According to Amateur Entomologists’ Society:  “Urticating hairs are possessed by some arachnids (specifically tarantulas) and insects (most notably larvae of some butterflies and moths). The hairs have barbs which cause the hair to work its way into the skin of a vertebrate. They are therefore an effective defence against predation by mammals.”  These hairs are much more likely to cause problems than a bite, and a nose-full of urticating hairs would not be a pleasant experience for Finn and it might require a trip to the vet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination