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Ed. Note:  We have never heard of a situation where Spiderlings remain together after leaving the female’s protection, and we suspect the “conga line” you witnessed was of creatures other than Spiders.  The behavior you describe is more typical of social insects like ants or immature Hemipterans.  Are you able to provide an image?

Subject: spiderlings traveling in a “conga line”
Location: Chemuyíl Pueblo, México Yucatán
January 8, 2017 10:58 am
There are many unusual bugs in the jungle here, such as spiders and scorpions that carry their babies on their backs.
I was delighted to find your site – thanks!
Can you tell me about spiderlings traveling in a “conga line”, hundreds of them? Why?
Signature: Malcolm

Tarantula Spiderling “Conga Line”

Hi again Malcolm,
Thanks for sending an image.  Our initial response to you expressed our doubt that Spiderlings would travel the way you described.  We retract our supposition.  These do indeed look like Spiders.  We will attempt to find additional internet documentation that can explain it.

Tarantula Spiderling “Conga Line”

Tina Shaddock comments on Facebook
I believe these are plausibly Brachypelma vagans spiderlings and this article holds a bit of info about what is occurring in this photo.
https://www.researchgate.net/figure/262617778_fig1_Figure-1-A-column-of-about-200-B-vagans-spiderlings-observed-on-the-road-by-the

Ed. Note:  Here is a quote from the linked article:  “The spiderlings, which have a body length of about 2-3 mm, stay in the maternal burrow for several weeks. Little is known of this gregarious stage in this species, although spiderlings have been observed moving around the entrance of the maternal burrow, in where their mother is hunting in a sit-and-wait position. They often climb over each other but avoid contact with the mother. During daytime, the spiderlings were known to remain active and visible at the entrance of the burrow for up to one hour after the female had retreated. They were able to move easily through the web covering laid by the female over the burrow entrance (Shillington & McEwen 2006). Authors hypothesized that the silk network around the burrow provides an important chemotactic cue for orientation (Minch 1978) and juveniles probably remain in contact with this network at all times. After this gregarious period, the spiderlings disperse in the form of columns of about 100 siblings walking away from the mother’s burrow (Reichling 2000, 2003; Shillington & McEwen 2006). Shi- llington & McEwen (2006) observed that during the night of May 24 th 2003, spider- lings left the maternal burrow in three lines. Then at random intervals, one individual left the column and headed in a different direction, causing successive forks in the column. The maximum observed distance of dispersal was 9 m from the maternal burrow. Dispersal is observed in several spider species, including several species of mygalomorphae, all using silk for ballooning (Coyle 1983) or orientation (Jean- son et al. 2004). Previous reports on B. vagans mention that the spiderlings walk in line like ants (Reichling 2000), but no work has recorded the use of silk during dispersal. During their gregarious and dispersal phases the spiderlings do not show any aggressive behavior toward each other, as many spiders do (Gundermann et al. 1986; Jeanson et al. 2004).”

Thank you! That description sounds entirely likely – location, environment, and behavior. And attached is a photo of an adult found outside the house. Who would have guessed? I feel happy to understand the critters here in more depth.
For what it’s worth, I’d wager the spiderlings stay in line visually. From their non-colliding dynamics, and seeing individuals lose their place in line and orient from an inch away to rejoin.
Thanks again.
Malcolm

Tarantula

Hi Malcolm,
Thanks for sending an image of what we believe to be an adult male Tarantula.  We will be featuring your posting for a spell.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge black spider in our bed
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
December 1, 2016 9:44 pm
My wife found this huge black spider crawling on our bed. Would you happen to know what it is?
Signature: Michael K

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Michael,
This is most definitely a Tarantula, and it is most likely a male wandering in search of a mate.  Tarantulas might bite if carelessly handled, but the bite is not dangerous, causing little more than local swelling and tenderness.  Urticating hairs can cause irritation and a severe skin reaction in sensitive people.  We are postdating your submission to go live on Christmas Day when we will be out of the office for the holidays.

Tarantula

Tarantula

Wow.  That is amazing.  We had thought it was a female crevice weaver.  So cool to find out it was actually a tarantula.  Thank you so much.  I really appreciate you taking the time to look at those pictures.
Michael

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Massive spider maybe 7 inches in Trinidad
Location: Trinidad, Caribbean
December 2, 2016 3:24 pm
My son and myself came across this massive spider on a bamboo patch in a small park area near our house. My son said it was a “Huntsman spider” but I am unsure he is correct (smart kid though). see pics below
Signature: Dion Santana

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Dion,
What a gorgeous Tarantula you encountered.  But for the lack on markings on the abdomen of your individual, we believe it resembles this Trinidad Chevron Tarantula,
Psalmopoeus cambridgei, which is pictured on YouTube.   Normally we refrain from citing Wikipedia, but it was there we learned the Trinidad Chevron Tarantula is “endemic to Trinidad” and “The female has chevron-shaped dark markings on the abdomen and her colour varies through shades of green and brown with characteristic red or orange flashes on the legs. The male is a more uniform grey or brown colour. It is a large, hairy, fast growing species that reaches six inches in leg span.”  The lack of markings and the longer legs indicates your individual is a male, and it sure looks like these male Trinidad Chevron Tarantulas pictured on Project Noah and Angelfire.  According to Tarantulas of the World:  “these animals spend most of their time up in trees blending in with their environment.”  Because we are preparing for a trip away from the office for the holidays, we are postdating your submission to go live at the end of the month.

Tarantula

Tarantula

Thank you very much 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider identification
Location: Northern California
November 12, 2016 11:30 pm
Found this decently large spider on my porch here in the rural mountains of northern California, Sierra Nevada foothills. The picture is a close up but it’s about half the size of my palm including legs. Any ideas of what kind of spider it is?
Signature: Christina

Trapdoor Spider

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Christina,
This is a Trapdoor Spider.  It resembles this individual from the genus
Calisoga that is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  From our personal email account.

Subject:  Tarantula in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 23, 2016
Daniel,
Can you ID this spider from this photo? S/he was not seeming well when Mark saw her – in a glass bowl on the porch, where she must have fallen 🙁
S/he’s much livlier since we gave her water and tiny crickets…Poor thing, I have no idea how long s/he was there.
Julian and I both think s/he looks more like a tarantula than a trapdoor spider.
c.

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Clare,
We agree with you and Julian that this is a Tarantula, and we are happy to hear it is recovering considering it looks dead in your image.  Female Tarantulas are reluctant to leave their burrows, and the males, which do not live as long, seek mates when the first rains of the season occur, much like related Trapdoor Spiders.  According to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin:  “Local hill residents are sometimes shocked to find a giant hairy spider crawling about their pations on a late summer’s eve.  Few Angelenos realize that tarantulas are permanent inhabitants of the dry grass and brush-covered hillsides of the basin.”  We also realize that habitat loss within the city is a contributing factor in reduced populations of Tarantulas, but your proximity to Rainbow Canyon Park and other preserved open space parks in the neighborhood is a good indication that local activism is having a positive impact on native species.  Hogue recognizes two species in Los Angeles,
 Aphonopelma eutylenum and Aphonopelma reversum.  We suspect your individual is most likely Aphonopelma eutylenum which is pictured on BugGuide, and which according to Hogue has males maturing in the fall.  Please keep us posted on this poor Tarantula’s recovery.

Thank you for the information. The tarantula is making a good recovery! We gave him (I decided he’s a male) water, which he  drank; then, three little crickets – of which he has eaten one. I just checked on him and he has buried himself under a combination of small wood chip/mulch and gossamer! So, I think he is recuperating well.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tarantula Came A-Walkin’
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 16, 2016 6:06 pm
Hello again! Just discovered this tarantula crawling across the yard at sundown, 7 PM. We had a male tarantula on our front porch several years ago, also in the fall, that you kindly identified. We tried not to disturb it too much as we took some photos, and then it crawled into the dry creekbed behind our yard.
Signature: Ellen

Texas Brown Tarantula

Texas Brown Tarantula

Hi Ellen,
We believe this is most likely a male Texas Brown Tarantula,
Aphonopelma hentzi, a species that is well represented with images on BugGuide.

Texas Brown Tarantula

Texas Brown Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination