Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mud Dauber with Araneus – Square Peg in a Round Hole!
Location: Thousand Hills State Park – Kirksville, MO
September 4, 2014 1:10 pm
Hi, Bugman!
I saw this rather interesting sight at work today. Apparently we have a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber nesting inside the hollows of our steel office door, and she has been getting in through a tiny gap above the door handle. I had seen a mud dauber hanging around the area, but didn’t realize there was one nesting there until I saw her on top of the door lever. At first I thought that she might be injured, but on closer inspection, she was trying to squeeze through the gap with a particularly rotund spider she had caught! I managed to snap some photos of the mud dauber doing some very amusing gymnastics, struggling to get the spider through the gap, before she left. Sadly, when she did give up and fly away, she did not drop the spider, which would have been helpful for identification! The most I can narrow down the spider is to the genus Araneus – which I realize, given the huge number of species under that umbrella, is like seeing an A-10 Warthog and identifying i t as ‘an aircraft of some kind.’ I was hoping you might have more luck in finding out what kind of spider our mud dauber had flown in, but, if not, then I simply hope you get a chuckle out of the photos.
Thanks!
Signature: EB

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver

Black and Yellow Mud Dauber preys on Orbweaver

Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.

Mud Dauber tried to stuff Orbweaver in hole.

Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver

Mud Dauber kicks it with Orbweaver

Dear EB,
We absolutely love your images of a Black and Yellow Mud Dauber attempting to return to its nest with this substantial Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown and yellow spider
Location: United States, Northeast, Pennsylvania
August 31, 2014 12:55 pm
Hey bug friends,
Any idea what kind of spider this may be? I usually have a pretty good eye, but I couldn’t pinpoint the precise family. Both pictures were taken in a relatively urban part of south central Pennsylvania, late July.
Thanks!
Signature: Sam

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Dear Sam,
This is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae
, and we are uncertain if we will be able to provide you with a species identification in the limited research time we have remaining this morning.  You can try browsing through BugGuide to see if you can identify the genus and species if we are unable to provide that information.  We suspect that based on this image on BugGuide, it might be an Arabesque Spider, Neoscona arabesca, but we are not certain.  According to BugGuide, this is a wide ranging species and it has much variation in the color and markings.

Possibly Arabesque Spider

Possibly Arabesque Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Poisonous spider in Greece?
Location: Kos Island, Greece
August 30, 2014 4:50 pm
Hello,
during my visit in Asklepion on Greek island Kos, we found on the stairs this big black spider, about 7 cm long. It was quite aggressive, when I took it away from the visitors, on a long stick to the nearest forrest, it was biting the stick!
Could you please help me identify what kind of spider it was?
Signature: Olaf

Female Ladybird Spider

Female Ladybird Spider

Dear Olaf,
In our opinion, this looks like a female Ladybird Spider in the family Erisidae, a family with many endangered and rare species.  Ladybird Spiders get their common name because of the coloration and markings of many male spiders in the family, which are red with black spots.  Ladybird Spiders exhibit pronounced sexual dimorphism, and the larger, often black females appear to be distinctly different species from the male Ladybird Spiders.  See FlickR for a similar looking image  and SpiderzRule for additional information on Ladybird Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider wasp’s (rescued) victim
August 22, 2014 9:14 am
I saw a wolf spider being attacked by a blue spider wasp today, and I managed to chase away the wasp and rescue the spider. I know some species only temporarily paralyze the victim, and I’ve seen the spider twitch, so…does he have any chance of recovering? I feel bad for intervening, especially since it’s probably too late for the spider, but the poor guy was trying very hard to get away, and I wanted to help him out.
I don’t know what kind exactly the wasp was, but it’s a Michigan variety.
Signature: Kitt

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Blue Black Spider Wasp preys upon Wolf Spider (from our archives)

Dear Kitt ,
We have heard of a Tarantula recovering from the sting of a wasp, but the whole purpose of the sting is to paralyze the spider so that it will provide food for the wasp larvae.  We are uncertain if it will recover.  We have illustrated your posting with an image from our archives.

Thanks for responding, and I’m glad you could answer my question. I’ll keep an eye on the spider. who knows? He might recover soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Warrior
Location: Texas
August 21, 2014 12:58 pm
this is just a pic i took that i thought i would share the story behind it is my mom poured soapy water to get rid of some ants outside near our melons in the process this big spider got washed out i picked it up with a stick to get it out and brushed the suds off with a leaf i left it for 20 minutes alone under a pot plant hoping it would be okay. but it wasn’t moving and its legs started to curl. i saw my nephews toys and thought well its dead i could take a nice pic, 10 minutes after the pic it jumped to life and scurried away i was shocked but happy it did not die
Signature: Coyote

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Wolf Spider saved from Drowning

Dear Coyote,
We love your story and accompanying image of this Wolf Spider rescued from drowning.  We have heard other accounts of drowned Wolf Spiders rescued from swimming pools that also revived and survived.  We are also tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fisher spider??
Location: New jersey
August 18, 2014 11:54 pm
I found this spider in my fireplace about 3 inches from my face while fixing the fireplace in August, northern New Jersey. I released it shortly after this photo session.
Signature: Tom

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Tom,
You have correctly identified a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, but we are uncertain of the species, though if you are located far from water, this is most likely
Dolomedes tenebrosus.  This is a female and she is carrying an egg sac.  Female Fishing Spiders carry an egg sac around until they find a suitable location to spin a nursery web in which to deposit the egg sac.  The female continues to guard the egg sac in the nursery web until she dies or until the egg sac hatches and the spiderlings disperse.  Because of your kindness to this expectant mother Fishing Spider, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination