Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Jumping spider
Location: Southwest MI
August 18, 2014 6:20 am
Found this fellow on the sliding patio doors to my deck. I live in the middle of an oak forest so spiders are abundant and I consider them my friends. This was the second time I have seen this particular species and I knew it was a jumper from its behavior. From what I can gather it falls in the Habronattus genus. Can you further identify it or give me any other information on it. Twice, while being photographed, it jumped up onto my camera! Thanks for your wonderful site.
Signature: d.k.dodge

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear d.k.dodge,
What a beautiful and expressive face your Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae has.  We apologize, be we can’t say for certain what this species is, but your images are postitively gorgeous and we hope perhaps one of our readers will write in with a comment and identification.  We cannot find any images on BugGuide that have the orange face combined with the chevron pattern on the abdomen.  If you happen to learn more, please let us know. 

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Update:  Platycryptus undatus???
Hi again d.k.dodge,
What do you think of these images of
Platycryptus undatus from BugGuide?  This individual has both the chevron markings on the abdomen, the orange mask, and it is found in Michigan.  Here is another example from BugGuide that shows both abdominal markings and facial coloration.

Thank you so much!  Looks like a match to me.  I love knowing the identity of every living thing I see.
Thanks again!
d.k.dodge

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Shining.. Glowing.. Crawling not jumping
Location: Olathe, KS
August 16, 2014 11:33 am
It’s late summer, I live in North Eastern Kansas and it was midday and I was cutting tall weeds. This guy popped out and appeared to be almost glowing or shining from the yellow in the body, it also appears to have white kinda furry on the body as well, from end of leg to leg it was about 3″
Signature: Holland Temple

Golden Orbweaver

Golden Orbweaver

Dear Holland,
This is a Golden Orbweaver,
Argiope aurantia, and like other members of the Orbweaver family Araneidae, these spiders generally live only a single season.  This appears to be a mature female who probably hatched this spring.  Younger Orbweavers generally pass unnoticed until they reach maturity toward the end of the summer.  Orbweavers rarely leave their webs, and they are rather clumsy if they have to move on the ground.  We suspect you probably inadvertently destroyed this gal’s orb web, causing her to scuttle through the grass.  She will find a new location to spin a web and you will most likely find her in the same location day after day.  Though a large Orbweaver might bite if carelessly handled, they are not aggressive spiders and in the event a bite does occur, there is rarely more than local swelling and some soreness.  The web of a Golden Orbweaver is quite strong, enabling the spiders to snare large flying insects, and we have even posted images in the past of a luckless Hummingbird being eaten by a large Golden Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpion with brood consumes wolf spider
Location: Toledo District , Belize
August 17, 2014 8:32 pm
After looking at your scorpion photos, I thought you might be interested in this image.
Signature: Tanya

Scorpion with Brood devours Spider

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

Dear Tanya,
You are our new hero.  These Food Chain images are awesome, but we have some questions.  Please tell us more about this Scorpion that appears to have been feeding indoors.  Was it living inside your home?  Also, the lighting is very different on the two images, with the redder image having more critical focus.  Why are the lighting conditions different?  We found a very similar looking Scorpion on The Flying Kiwi, but it is listed as unidentified.  Since the head of the spider has already been devoured, we didn’t think we would be able to identify your Wolf Spider, but we found an image on Scott Leslie’s site that looks very similar to the Wolf Spider in your images.  Alas, it is not identified beyond the family.  We love that you have supplied images to our site that document the maternal behavior of Scorpions.

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

Scorpion with Brood devours Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sweet Salticidae?
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
August 17, 2014 9:04 am
It was such a treat to find this sweet little guy the other day because they are not easy to come by. Salticidae are my favourite spiders and I am grateful to this little one being so cooperative. I can’t seem to find who his is, though. Hopefully you can help me out.
Signature: Vanessa – Photographer and friend of all spiders.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Hi Vanessa – Photographer and friend of all spiders,
We will attempt to identify your Jumping Spider at a later point in time.  We believe this is a male and he has beautiful eyelashes.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Marbled Orb Weaver and Wasp Lunch
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
August 17, 2014 9:00 am
Caught this beautiful girl preparing lunch in a Toronto, Ontario park the other day. I’m guessing that she is an Araneus diadematus. I don’t know who lunch was.
Signature: Vanessa – Photographer and friend of all spiders

Orbweaver eats Prey

Orbweaver eats Prey

Dear Vanessa – Photographer and friend of all spiders,
This certainly is an Orbweaver, and the prey might be a Sand Wasp.  We believe you have correctly identified the scientific name of this Orbweaver, Araneus diadematus, however the common name is Cross Spider or European Orbweaver, not Marbled Orbweaver.  See BugGuide for other images of Cross Spiders.  See BugGuide for some examples of Sand Wasps.
 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Brown Spider
Location: West Coast, USA, California
August 15, 2014 11:25 pm
I have a friend in Southern California that’s been finding large brown spiders in her house for the last few years, they have approximately a 5-6 inch leg span with a dark brown stripe on the butt. The only Californian spider I could find that was similar in body type was the long legged sac spider. I’ve attached a picture she took of one in her house, Any help would be appreciated; She’s lived in California for 30 years and has only started seeing these guys recently.
Signature: Scorpio Maurus

Huntsman Spider

Huntsman Spider

Dear Scorpio Maurus,
There is not enough detail in this image to verify the species with certainty, but we are confident that this is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  Many species are nocturnal predators that wander about in search of prey including Cockroaches.  They hunt without building webs.  North American Huntsman Spiders are considered harmless.  This may be
Olios giganteus, and as you can see by comparing your description to this and other images on BugGuide, there is a dark brown stripe on the abdomen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination