Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Male ladybird spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Between Lindos and Pefkos
Date: 05/30/2019
Time: 08:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi
We saw this today walking across the patio of a villa. It walked casually across the patio, attempted to climb one of the walls, then found shelter behind an aircon unit. It was about the size of a €2 coin. We think it’s a ladybird spider from our Googling, but would love an experts opinion!
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  No

Ladybird Spider

Dear No,
Thanks so much for submitting your detailed and beautiful image of a male Ladybird Spider sighted between Lindos and Pefkos.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ladybird spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Patras, Greece
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 02:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! Here are some photos from our school yard
How you want your letter signed:  Wendy

Male Ladybird Spider

Dear Wendy,
Thanks for sending in your awesome image of an endangered male Ladybird Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider wasp and prey
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, Illinois
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 01:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw you were looking for a image of this spider and its prey. Just a cell phone picture but shows key features.
How you want your letter signed:  Christopher S

Spider Wasp and Wolf Spider Prey

Dear Christopher,
Thanks so much for submitting your awesome image of a Spider Wasp,
Entypus unifasciatus, and its Wolf Spider prey.  The Wolf Spider will not be eaten by the Spider Wasp.  She feeds on nectar from flowers, and the paralyzed Wolf Spider will provide fresh food for a larval Spider Wasp which will eat its paralyzed meal alive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Charming lime-green jumping spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Pinellas, FL
Date: 05/03/2019
Time: 03:48 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I found this charming lime green spider a few days ago, at school on a handrail underneath an oak tree. At the time I found him, it was a early summer day, very hot. After a little bit of spider-chasing, I had him on my hand. He didn’t seem that scared, and was quite interested in my phone, which he attempted(and succeeded), on multiple occasions, to jump onto. I’m writing this right when I have access to the internet again!
This charismatic little spider was about as big as the nail on my thumb, and moved in quick bursts. It was fond of jumping, which was odd because the only thing that resembled that of the jumping spiders i’m familiar with is the face. I considered keeping him for a little while just to look at him and study his feeding behaviour, but I thought that would constitute as arthropod kidnap and I thought he’d like his tree a lot better. I let him go back on the trunk of the oak tree(which was a bit hard, since he was very interested in my upper arm), so he wouldn’t be squashed by passerby.
How you want your letter signed:  Chance Arceneaux

Magnolia Green Jumper

Dear Chance,
This little beauty is a Magnolia Green Jumper,
Lyssomanes viridis, and she is actually a female.  The Magnolia Green Jumper is a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism, meaning the male Magnolia Green Jumper looks like a very different species.  Here is a BugGuide image of the male.  Though we question how many passersby would have even noticed her, we are nonetheless tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award as an acknowledgement of your concerns.

Magnolia Green Jumper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Banded Huntsman
Geographic location of the bug:  Wee Waa
Date: 05/02/2019
Time: 11:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is it rare to find Banded Huntsman so far from the coast?
How you want your letter signed:  Nick

Banded Huntsman Spider

Dear Nick,
Thanks for sending in your image of a Banded Huntsman Spider.  According to Atlas of Living Australia, the species is reported even further inland than your location.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Possibly Huntsman spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Bali, Indonesia
Date: 05/01/2019
Time: 08:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this one in my hotel room and was unable to catch it. About the size of the palm of my hand. Judging from the pics on this site, it has the right “pacman” markings to be a Huntsman, but it doesn’t have the awkward legs and movements of other Huntsman spiders I’ve seen.  Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Jason

Male Huntsman Spider

Dear Jason,
This is indeed a Huntsman Spider and we believe it is a long legged male
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has spread to many tropical ports because of the importation of bananas, giving it the common name Banana Spider.

Comment from Cesar Crash
Looks like Heteropoda, but I think H. venatoria never has this stripy legs, at least the ones introduced in Brazil, they are quite common here. This genus has so many species, many of them in Indonesia: https://wsc.nmbe.ch/genus/3115/Heteropoda

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination