Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Everglade City Florida
Date: 04/30/2019
Time: 09:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
Friends of mine in Everglade City sent me this image of a very cool spider. It’s the size of a pinky fingernail. It was seen on their kitchen counter (eek??) in Everglade City Florida…Any help you can give is truly appreciated. (I’m better with insects than arachnids)
Thanks!!
How you want your letter signed:  Katja

Green Orbweaver

Dear Katja,
The best we can do at this time is to provide a general family name.  This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.

Thank you Daniel,
They will be happy to hear it is harmless, since they turned it loose in their yard! Any further information would be appreciated…it really is a cool looking spider,
Katja
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Pensacola Florida
Date: 04/25/2019
Time: 08:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Sitting at the dog park watching my pup chase squirrels and this little guy landed on bench next to me.  Very cool looking but I don’t think I’ve ever seen one like it here on the gulf coast.  Any idea what kind of spider this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Cristal

Magnolia Green Jumper

Dear Cristal,
The Magnolia Green Jumper is a vividly green, native species, and you can verify its identity thanks to this BugGuide image.  Like other Jumping Spiders in the family Salticidae, the Magnolia Green Jumper is considered harmless to humans, hunts its prey rather than building a web to snare prey, and has excellent eyesight.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this jumping spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Louisville Ky USA
Date: 04/17/2019
Time: 06:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, can you id this tiny jumper for me? About sesame seed size, found on mailbox in Louisville Ky onApril 17, 2019. Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Shelby

Jumping Spider

Dear Shelby,
We are posting your image of a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, though we did not manage to quickly identify it.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a proper species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  It looks like Lucas the Singing Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Livingston Parish, Louisiana
Date: 04/20/2019
Time: 05:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My daughter and I found this cute little guy on our siding. All of him could fit on a dime without falling off. Any clue what species he is? I THINK jes a jumper but I’m not sure. His fur is what caught my eye. He literally turned and watched us both to see us from different angles. He was just as curious about us as we were of him.
How you want your letter signed:  Jackie and Sophie

Bold Jumper we believe

Dear Jackie and Sophie,
This is indeed a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and as you observed, they have excellent eyesight.  Because of the green chelicerae, we believe this is a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  spider on black swallowtail
Geographic location of the bug:  Auburn, California
Date: 04/17/2019
Time: 01:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought this was a cool image of a spider incapacitating a black swallowtail. This was along a trail, near the flowers the butterfly was feeding on. Maybe a crab spider? Enjoy!
How you want your letter signed:  k. cassidy

Crab Spider eats Pipevine Swallowtail

Dear k. cassidy,
This is an awesome image.  We agree that this is a Crab Spider.  Crab Spiders do not build webs to snare prey.  Many species, especially pastel colored, pink, yellow or white Crab Spiders, are camouflaged in blossoms where they wait to ambush pollinating prey like bees and butterflies.  Your Swallowtail is actually a Pipevine Swallowtail.  Did you witness the Crab Spider capture the Pipevine Swallowtail?  If not, was the Swallowtail still alive when you encountered this awesome Food Chain illustration, though interestingly, this is not the first time we have received documentation of a Crab Spider eating a Pipevine Swallowtail.

yes, love the pipevine swallowtails this time of year (here they like the lilac and brodiaea best). I did not see it in the capturing phase, but this butterfly was still alive though incapacitated. Seemingly big prey, but the spider had him for sure! This is in the Auburn State Recreation Area along the American River in Northern California.
Thanks for the ink to the other crab spider catching a pipevine! I didn’t see that when I first searched.
Enjoy and share the image!
thanks,
kerrie
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Antigua Guatemala
Date: 03/25/2019
Time: 12:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey there!
This gorgeous spider has been hanging out in my shower for the past 3 weeks. It doesn’t move, nor does it flinch when I move. It’s just been growing (look at size difference of body from week 1 to now)
How you want your letter signed:  Leilani

Two-Tailed Spider

Dear Leilani,
This really is a beautiful spider.  It looked vaguely familiar to us, and we searched for spiders with long spinnerets, and discovered the Trapped in Nature & Exploration Malaysian blog with an entry about Tree trunk spiders belong[ing] to the Family Hersiliidae.  We have a Two-Tailed Spider from Indonesia in our archive, so we searched BugGuide for North American representatives, and there discovered
Neotama mexicana which ranges from “Cameron and Hidalgo Counties of southmost Texas, south to S. Amer” and the “Perch head down on tree trucks or stone walls.”  BugGuide also notes:  “When an insect approaches the waiting spider, the spider jumps over the prey. The spider then spreads silk by rapidly running in circles with the spinnerets toward the prey. When the prey is completely wrapped, it is bitten and eaten. They are amazingly fast. No snare is built.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination