Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rare pale wishbone spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Adelaide hills
Date: 05/04/2019
Time: 03:10 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi daniel, i think this
Is a pale wishbone spider can you confirm? Also i didnt kill this arafhnid because i love animals and bugs way too much lol also what insect/arachnid is its fav food And it looks like a mouse spider so how bad is the venom?
How you want your letter signed:  Cael Gallery

Possibly Pale Wishbone Spider

Dear Cael,
We cannot say for certain that this is a Pale Wishbone Spider, but it surely resembles the individual pictured on the Arachne.org.au where it states:  “Wishbone spiders are mostly medium-sized mygalomorphs, similar to funnelwebs, but with a golden or silvery look due to fine hairs on the head. They cannot climb smooth vertical surfaces. They have two small spinnerets seen at the rear end of the body, usually pointing up. Their name is derived from their Y shaped shallow burrows, to about 40cm deep, with one arm slightly concealed below the surface of the soil. The Main entrance is lightly covered with silk but has no door.”  Elsewhere on Arachne.org.au, Pale Wishbone Spiders in the genus
Aname are described as:  “A medium to large mygalomorph spider with an open burrow, in drier parts of Australia. The burrow is sometimes raised at the surface and shallow, Y shaped, lined with silk, and inclined perhaps to a depth of 40cm at most. This spider has a pale carapace, unusual for Aname, which usually are black spiders. Males have a long spine at the middle of the tibia, the shin section on the first leg, and are quick to rise to the defensive pose. The spinnerets project some distance beyond the rear, usually straight out.”

Ok Thank you, I am only 11 so not the best at identifying but I’m gonna pat myself on the back for getting that far lol

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  I see these everywhere
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Florida
Date: 05/07/2019
Your letter to the bugman:  I keep seeing these all over near my house and outside. Can’t identify it. Please help
How you want your letter signed:  Cory

Flattie

Dear Cory,
Spiders in the genus
Selenops are frequently called Flatties, and here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider living in my bushes
Geographic location of the bug:  Georgia, USA
Date: 05/09/2019
Time: 11:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I fiund this spider while trimming my hedges today. I let it stay there to live but I’m curious as to what kind of spider it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Elle

Orchard Spider

Dear Elle,
This little beauty looks to us like an Orchard Spider,
Leucauge venusta, and you may compare your image to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is “Woodlands. Builds in low shrubs or small trees, close to the ground.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this spider a Ladybird
Geographic location of the bug:  Greece south Peloponnesis
Date: 05/07/2019
Time: 04:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Do you know what is this ?
I met this strange spider in Stoupa last Monday.
It was walking quite slowly on the road, body is strong and as large as a 2€ coin, legs are strong too and very tightly gathered around the body.
Wondering if it is common in this area, this is first time I see such strange bug.
I’ve been told this might be a Ladybird Spider
How you want your letter signed:  Chris1957

Probably Ladybird Spider

Dear Chris1957,
We believe that you are correct in suspecting that this is a Ladybird Spider in the family Eresidae.  This image on FlickR and this image on FlickR look very similar.  Ladybird Spiders exhibit extreme sexual dimorphism, meaning males and females look very different, and it is the male Ladybird Spider that is responsible for the common name.

Thanks a lot for the confirmation
Take care
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tarantula?
Geographic location of the bug:  East Bay, California (Danville)
Date: 05/06/2019
Time: 12:49 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
We found this guy at the bottom of the pool in early May, and sadly it doesn’t appear that he was a swimmer. We would love to know what kind of tarantula he was, as it appears most of the local sighting are on Mount Diablo and not down in the valley by us.  The California Ebony tarantula seems to be most prevalent in this region, but the pictures we’ve seen online don’t look like an exact match (ie ours has 4 orange spots on his belly).  Thank you for any help or advice you might be able to give!!
Ps we didn’t get a chance to measure him but the last picture has the hand of a 12-year-old for reference.
How you want your letter signed:  Clueless in Cali

Tarantula

Dear Clueless in Cali,
Based on BugGuide images and the reported range, we believe this is
Aphonopelma iodius.  According tom SF Bay Wildlife:  ” The species in the Bay area has been determined to be Aphonopelma iodius.”

Tarantula

Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Everglade City Florida
Date: 04/30/2019
Time: 09:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
Friends of mine in Everglade City sent me this image of a very cool spider. It’s the size of a pinky fingernail. It was seen on their kitchen counter (eek??) in Everglade City Florida…Any help you can give is truly appreciated. (I’m better with insects than arachnids)
Thanks!!
How you want your letter signed:  Katja

Green Orbweaver

Dear Katja,
The best we can do at this time is to provide a general family name.  This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.

Thank you Daniel,
They will be happy to hear it is harmless, since they turned it loose in their yard! Any further information would be appreciated…it really is a cool looking spider,
Katja
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination