Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Trap Door Spider
Location:  James Island, SC
October 6, 2010 6:08 am
Hi Bugman,
We love WTB. My wife swept up this spider whilst doing her daily chore. I think its a trap door spider. I flipped it over for a better look.
Thanks.
Signature:  Simply Bananas

Corklid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Simply Bananas,
We wanted to hurry to get one more post up before rushing to work since we had a connectivity issue today.  We agree that this is a Trapdoor Spider, probably in the genus
Ummidia which is well represented by specimens from the South in our archives and on Bugguide.  The view of the underside is quite nice, and it matches this image on BugGuide.

Corklid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

WTH is this?
Location:  Paris, France
October 2, 2010 12:18 pm
Oh please help me identify this Spider! I am living in the suburbs of Paris and I am forever seeing these in my window. Can you tell me what kind of Spider it is and if it is dangerous?
Signature:  American in Paris

Orbweaver: Wasp Spider

Dear American in Paris,
The Spiders of Northwest Europe website identifies this lovely Orbweaver as
Argiope bruennichi, and it is commonly called a Wasp Spider, though it is unclear where that common name is used.  We doubt it is the common name in France since the name is in English.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tarantula???
Location:  Salt Lake City
October 2, 2010 10:24 pm
My wife and I were hiking in the foothills just north of Salt Lake City in City Creek Canyon when we happened on this big hairy guy (or maybe gal). The Utah Museum of Natural History website has information on a Salt Lake City Brown tarantula. Could this be a SLC Brown?
Signature:  Chris

Salt Lake City Brown Tarantula

Hi Chris,
Your Tarantula is beautiful.  It matches a photo of
Aphonopelma iodius which we located on BugGuide. or the Desert Blond Tarantula, Aphonopelma chalcodes, which is also pictured on BugGuideBugGuide also has this information posted on the genus page:  “The Aphonopelma of North American are poorly known. Although many species have been described few specimens can be properly identified either by using available keys or by wading through species descriptions . Most identifiable specimens belong to species found in Mexico or Central America that are easily recognized by unique color patterns, such as that of A. seemanni . Correct identification of specimens collected within the United States is often suspect since determinations must be based on the process of elimination using collection dates and locality data in combination with coloration, coxal setation, and metatarsal scopulation ” and the quote is attributed to http://americanarachnology.org/JoA_free/JoA_v25_n2/JoA_v25_p137.pdf.  At the very bottom of the Spiderzrule Tarantula page we found a photo of the Salt Lake City Brown Tarantula and it is identified as Aphonopelma melanium.  Interestingly, the Salt Lake City Brown Tarantula on the Utah Museum of Natural History website is identified as the first spider we mentioned, Aphonopelma iodius.  It was found in Salt Lake City and it is a brown Tarantula, so we are content calling it a Salt Lake City Brown Tarantula.

Salt Lake City Brown Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Glossy Red and black spider from Papua highlands
Location:  Tembagapura, Papua, Indonesia
October 2, 2010 10:08 pm
We see these small spiders with a red cephalothorax and upper half of legs and glossy black abdomen and lower half of legs around the house here in the highlands (2500 meters) in Papua, Indonesia. Any ideas what they are?
Signature:  Kevin

Red and Black Spider from Indonesia

Dear Kevin,
This is one awesome looking spider.  We want to GUESS that this might be a Cobweb Spider in the family Theridiidae, the same family that includes such black and red poisonous spiders as the Black Widow from North America and the Red Back Spider from Australia.  Red and Black are codified warning colors in the insect and bug* worlds, and that warning is generally poison.  We hope our readership will come to our rescue with the name of this begloved she-beauty.

* Ed. Note: Bugs are loosely defined as “Thing That Crawl” in Daniel’s new book The Curious World of Bugs.

Spider from Papua

Update
Hi Daniel,
Thanks – I think you steered me in the right direction.  I’m going to guess this is in the Nicodamidae family which was split out of the family Theridiidae (according to what I can find on some Aussie web sites) about 15 years ago.  The Australian Red and Black spider (not to be confused with the Red Back) looks almost identical to mine and is a member of this family.
This one has a body length of 8mm, and from what I can tell looking at pictures would appear to be a female.
Regards,
Kevin

Thanks for writing back Kevin.  As you did not provide a link, we searched and found the family Nicodamidae on the Spiders of Australia website and there were photos of Nicodamus peregrinus, which looks very close to your specimen.  The webpage indicates Nicodamus peregrinus can be found in Eastern Australia, and that “The family Nicodamidae consist of nine genera with 29 descibed species, all living in Australia, one in New Guinea and one in New-Zealand.”  The Esperance Fauna website also devotes nice coverage to the family Nicodamidae.

Sorry for not including the links – yes, those were the sites I found most helpful also.
Cheers,
Kevin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Weird Bug
Location:  Thetford, Norfolk, England
September 26, 2010 3:57 am
I found this on my toilet wall very near 2 dead spiders. it’s about 5cm long.
Signature:  name of the bug

Long Bodied Cellar Spider

This sure looks to us like a Long Bodied Cellar Spider, Pholcus phalangioides, which has a worldwide distribution according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

odd colored spider
Location:  santa fe nm
September 28, 2010 7:41 pm
We have recently moved to santa fe nm, and have found a few of these spiders in our yard. They are hairy black. With a smooth red abdomen. They are about the size of a jumping spider
Signature:  sean j hizny

Jumping Spider

Hi Sean,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, possibly a male
Phidippus ardens, which we found pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination