Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/23/2019
Time: 04:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest season is here and I noticed this very swollen Green Lynx Spider on the second generation descendant of a seed that came from a Woodhead bud purchased at Cornerstone Collective about three years ago.  I harvested the plant on Saturday, but on Friday I noticed the Green Lynx Spider was much thinner and she was now guarding an egg sac.  Needless to say, I did not need the buds on half of the bifurcated stem, so I tied an orange tag on the stem that reads “Spider Nursery” and I will let her live out her days guarding her eggs before I harvest the remaining buds so she will have habitat around her.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
We always enjoy your submissions, but because of your self sacrificing impulse regarding the survival of your Green Lynx Spider’s brood, we are bequeathing you with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Green Lynx Spider with Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huntsman Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Phoenix, AZ
Date: 09/08/2019
Time: 06:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this rather large spider on my pool fence in summer. Leg span appeared to be around 4 inches or so.
How you want your letter signed:  Ed

Huntsman Spider

Dear Ed,
Thanks so much for sending in your detailed images of a Huntsman Spider in the genus
Olios.

Huntsman Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Orb – Albino?
Geographic location of the bug:  Boerne, Texas
Date: 09/02/2019
Time: 10:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have looked through MANY pictures of Orbs, but this critter seems unique. She seems to have the correct pattern for a black and yellow orb, but not the right colors. Can spiders be albino (besides the obvious cave dwellers), thoughts?
How you want your letter signed:  Adam Branch

Pale Golden Orbweaver

Dear Adam,
We don’t know if this is considered a true albino, but we agree it is a Golden Orbweaver,
Argiope aurantiaBugGuide has an image of a similar looking individual that is called a “light color morph” and this BugGuide image is also of a light individual.

Daniel,
Thanks for the reply! Those do look similar, I am always d6o fascinated with the constant variety of nature. Have a great day
Respectfully,
Adam
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Jumping spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Trinidad, West Indies
Date: 08/23/2019
Time: 11:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Hoping you can help by identifying this pretty iridescent jumping spider. This one was on the wall of my front porch
How you want your letter signed:  Gwiz

Jumping Spider: Psecas viridipurpureus ???

Dear Gwiz,
We have in the past tentatively identified a similar looking Brazilian Jumping Spider as
Psecas viridipurpureus and today while searching, we can’t help but to wonder if we have stumbled ironically upon your website, Gil Wizen Spiders, where there is an image identified as Psecas viridipurpureus and that also looks the same.  Your individual looks like Psecas croesus which is pictured on Jumping Spiders and which ranges in Guiana and Suriname according to Jumping Spiders.  That same Jumping Spiders site only has black and white drawings of Psecas viridipurpureus, and the range is listed as Brazil and Peru.  On that same Jumping Spiders site, Psecas barbaricus is only pictured in a black and white drawing, but the range is listed as Brazil and Trinidad.  The best we can assure is the genus Psecas.

Hi Daniel.
Thanks so much for your response and your help identifying my spider!
What a coincidence about the Gil Wizen website name. Lovely site but nope it isn’t mine. I am actually afraid of spiders:) I appreciate them and their role in the environment but I can assure you I appreciate them from a distance.
Your help was greatly appreciated.
Giselle.

You are welcome Giselle.  The name similarity was quite a coincidence.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Botswana
Date: 08/20/2019
Time: 07:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello
I found this spider in Botswana 2018. I searched in the Internet and it looks like it must be a Green Lynx Spider. But that one only exsist in America. What is your opinion?
How you want your letter signed:  Greetings, Niklas.

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Niklas,
You are correct that the North American Green Lynx Spider,
Peucetia viridans, is not native to Botswana, but the genus is represented in Africa as evidenced by this FlickR image from Madagascar and this FlickR image from Mozambique.  The large pedipalps indicate that your individual is a male. 

Update:  September 1, 2019
Thanks a lot for your reply,
So here’s some evidence that it also exists in Botswana. We found it at our previous home in Dekar close to Ghanzi, Botswana.
Greetings

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Anastasia island, Florida
Date: 08/19/2019
Time: 08:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m pretty sure I know what this is, but would like a second opinion please!
How you want your letter signed:  JPerry

Golden Silk Spider

Dear JPerry,
The Golden Silk Spider,
Nephila clavipes, takes its common name from the golden color of the incredibly strong silk with which it weaves its web.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination