Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of bug is this?
Location: Newark, DE in the United States
August 5, 2014 11:46 am
My kids have been telling me about this crazy looking bug that has been eating bees in our back yard. But I have never seen one personally until today my son pointed one out with a bee captured in its mouth while both are captured in a spider Web! If you could identify this so I can explain to them I would greatly appreciate it alot. Plus for my knowledge also. Thank you greatly and Good bless.
Signature: Pyle Boys

Spider eats Hanging Thief eats Yellowjacket

Spider eats Hanging Thief eats Yellowjacket

Dear Pyle Boys,
We need to begin by telling you we love your documentation of a multi-link Food Chain.  We only wish your image was sharp enough and detailed enough for us to be able to identify the Spider.  The flying predator is a type of Robber Fly known as a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  The Hanging Thief gets its common name because it often hangs from one leg while eating the large winged prey, often bees or wasps, that it captures on the wing.  The prey in question is not a bee, but a Yellowjacket.

Multi-Link Food Chair: Spider eats Fly eats Wasp

Multi-Link Food Chair: Spider eats Fly eats Wasp

I am gonna attach a few more pics of the spider close up and hopefully this can help. And thank you for clearing up the curiosity for me and my sons! And glad you like the food chain effect my son thought it was cool how life works. Thanks again!

Possibly Common House Spider

Possibly Common House Spider

Thanks for sending the additional images, but unfortunately, the images are not critically sharp and it also appears that the color is decidedly cyan/blue, which makes the subtle coloration on the spider difficult to distinguish.  The Hanging Thief and Yellowjacket were quite obvious, but not so with the spider, which may be a Common House Spider, Parasteatoda tepidariorum.  You can see the resemblance to this individual on Bugguide.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown arachnid
Location: Parker Texas
August 4, 2014 9:40 pm
I see a lot of bugs, thanks to my occupation I’m relieved to find this website.
Try this one guys.
Found in Parker Texas, in a garage. Mid summer, plenty of tall trees around the area.
Signature: -thank you kindly -Deej

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Hi Deej,
This is some species of Trapdoor Spider, and we believe it is a male.  It looks to us like it might be a Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Myrmekiaphila based on images posted to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Male Lady Bird Spider
Location: Valais, Switzerland
August 4, 2014 5:17 am
We discovered these male Lady Bird Spiders today in Cotterg, Valais, Switzerland. We looked them up online and were led to your website where we found out they are a rare and endangered spider. We saw THREE of them today, and wanted to share our photos with this wonderful site for others to enjoy this beautiful spider.
Signature: Swiss Sarah

Male Ladybird Spider

Male Ladybird Spider

Dear Swiss Sarah,
Thanks for sending your documentation of male Ladybird Spiders in Switzerland.  We guess it is mating season there as the brightly colored male Ladybird Spiders are out searching for the drastically different looking, sexually dimorphic female Ladybird Spiders that rarely leave their burrows.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any Idea?
Location: Sydney, NSW, Australia
August 2, 2014 5:13 am
Hey,
I found this 2cm big guy near a salt water river in Sydney, Australia. I have no clue if its a spider/scorpion thing or just a bug or whatever. I am not even sure if there a 4, 6 or 8 legs …
I googled a lot but cant find anything helpful…
(sorry for my english 😉 )
Signature: Ben

Crab Spider: Sidymella species

Crab Spider: Sidymella species

Dear Ben,
Your English is perfectly fine.  Your confusion is well founded.  Both Spiders and Scorpions are classified in the zoological class Arachnida, the Arachnids, so they share many physical similarities.  Insects and Arachnids, including Spider and Scorpions, are classified together in the phylum Arthropoda, and again, they all share certain physical characteristics.  With that stated, this is a Spider in the order Araneae, and Spiders are identified because they have two body parts, the cephalothorax (combined head and thorax) and abdomen, and eight legs.  This particular Spider is holding its two front pairs of legs together, which makes it a bit difficult to count.  The two front pairs of legs are considerably longer than the rear two pairs, and this is a physical trait shared by Crab Spiders in the family Thomisidae.  Once we got to that level of identification, we turned to one of our favorite sites for identifying Australian Arthropods, the Brisbane Insects and Spiders, where we found a very similar looking Crab Spider identified as being in one of two genera:
Tmarus or Sidymella.  The site author coined the name Peak Crab Spider ” because its abdomen rises to a dorsal peak.  Its two front pairs of legs are much longer than the hind two pairs.”  Scroll to the bottom of the page to see the Peak Crab Spider.  Armed with that information, we found other representatives in the genus pictured on Spiders of Australia, and the closest matches are not yet fully identified, and are given the names Sidymella ZZ477 and Sidymella ZZ592.  Those letter and number identifyers indicate that the Spiders have yet to be described in a published paper at which time they can be given species names by the describer.  This is a very exciting posting for us and we are featuring it in our scrolling featured posting bar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Location:  Vermont
July 26, 2014
Thank you!
No one identified my spider from a couple months ago?
Attached.
Notice her front 2 leggies are together, so dainty.
I wondered at first, as you might well imagine.
She was larger than your usual Vt spider…
Best!
MG

Nursery Web Spider

Nursery Web Spider

Dear MG,
This is a Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina mira.  We are unable to respond to all of our mail, and it is possible that this arrived when we were away from the office.  If you don’t hear back from us within a week or so, we would urge you to resend the request, and remember to attach the image again.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WT Spider?
Location: Bronx, NY
July 13, 2014 5:22 pm
Saw this spider in Bronx, NY last June. Beautiful pattern on its back!
Signature: Mark

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Hi Mark,
This gorgeous spider is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and we are going to attempt to research the species at a later time.  Jumping Spiders are harmless to humans.  They are hunting spiders that do not spin webs to trap prey, preferring to pounce on flies and other prey, often from a great distance.  The large eyes have excellent vision, and the accuracy of their hunting skills are quite wondrous.

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Amazing! Thanks so much!
FYI,  I’ve got a bunch of other insect closeup photos that I’d love to send for ID as I become more interested in the world of insect photography. I know you guys are busy, so I hope you don’t mind. I frequently post these pictures with IDs on a photo enthusiast website, so please know that your help to me is also benefitting other photo enthusiasts in their knowledge of insects.
Thanks again!

We would love additional high quality images, but please submit only one per day.  You can submit images and identification requests by using the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.

Update:  December 29, 2018
Thanks to Barbara who identified this Emerald Jumping Spider which is pictured on BugGuide, though not with that common name.  According to the Penn State Entomology Department site:  “Description  Paraphidippus aurantius is quite variable in appearance, owing somewhat to the iridescent scales that appear as different colors depending on the observer’s point of view. Additionally, the color of some of the markings can range from a light golden brown to white.
The female has a band of light-colored scales extending from the eyes around the lateral margins of the cephalothorax and also around the sides of the abdomen. The dorsal surfaces of both the cephalothorax and abdomen are a light reddish-brown with iridescent green scales. The eyes are surrounded by a patch of black scales. The abdomen has four pair of white spots—the third pair elongated laterally—and orange spots midway on the sides of the abdomen. The legs are brown, with the first pair having black bands. Males are much darker, which makes the abdominal spots stand out while the orange spots are harder to see. Females are 8 to 12 millimeters long, while males 7 are 10 millimeters in length.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination