Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider (Identification)
Location: Montenegro
July 4, 2014 4:21 am
Found this guy on a pile of big stone tiles in the sun, The picture isn’t perfect but I think it had 6 of those orange/red spots on his back. Small in size few mm in size (3-7mm maybe?).
Signature: eatyourdog

Immature female Widow Spider

Immature female Widow Spider

Dear eatyourdog,
This is an immature female Widow Spider in the genus
Latrodectus.  According to this araneae website, the species Latrodectus tredecimguttatus is found in Montenegro and the site states it is found:  “In dry habitats, dunes, sandy beaches, shingle beaches and on low vegetation.  This species can bite humans, as also all other Latrodectus species in the world. Often, a bite causes significant effects, with severe and long-lasting pain in two-thirds of cases, preventing patients from sleeping in one-third of cases. Pain increases in more than half of the cases within the first hour and mostly radiates into the limbs or abdominal pain develops. Typical symptoms include sweating in about 70% of cases and further systemic effects in 20–30% of cases (nausea and vomiting in less than 20%, raised temperature and neuromuscular effects in about 10%, hypertension in less than 10% of cases). Pain usually lasts 1–2 days and the other symptoms 1–4 days. In Europe, bites have become very rare in the last decades. If needed, a symptomatic medical treatment is recommended.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Las Vegas Black Hairy Spider
Location: Henderson NV, Las Vegas suburb
July 4, 2014 12:48 pm
I love your site. I looked at your spiders for a few days but although I found the trap door spider to be close, the rear body tank is not the same shape as my unknown spider. I never saw this 2-inch spider before. It was found on the wall of my garage, in June, 110 F weather day. I captured it, took the photo then released it in some rocks at a nearby park. You can zoom in my photo to see the eyes and hair. Thank you.
Signature: Boyd in Las Vegas

Female Southern House Spider

Female Southern House Spider

Dear Boyd,
Unfortunately, you cannot really make out the eye arrangement of this spider in your image.  This is a female Southern House Spider,
Kukulcania hibernalis, and according to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”

Thanks, Dan.     Now when I walk by the park, I will say hello to her.    I never feared her but just wanted to get her farther away from human danger.
Boyd

Hi again Boyd,
Because of your sensitivity toward the natural world, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: SPIDER IDENTIFICATION
Location: Balsam Lake Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada
July 3, 2014 9:44 am
Taken at Balsam Lake Provincial Park, Ontario…I dislike spiders but found this one intriguing, he/she was on my tent, didn’t like the light when shined on him…can you identify…pretty fast mover when placed on tree after removal from tent…camp site was not near water, lake was about a mile away…at least 2-2 1/2 inches in total diameter…he seemed to like hanging out on the mesh of my tent…thanks in advance, I have never seen such a large spider in Ontario…almost tarantula like in appearance, hairy, brownish/blackish…
Signature: Thanks for your help, Kim Savoie

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Hi Kim,
Even though you indicate that the lake was some distance away, this is nonetheless a Fishing Spider or Dock Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are generally found in close proximity to water.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very Large Spiders in Tennessee
Location: Nashville, TN
July 1, 2014 3:46 pm
I have found a few of these big spiders in my house this year. This is the first time I have come across them. They seem to be slow moving, but they do jump.
Signature: Diane

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Hi Diane,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes and they are considered harmless to humans.  Fishing Spiders are generally found not far from a source of water.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug in the Philippines
Location: Philippines
June 19, 2014 7:08 am
Hi Guys,
Spotted this bug here in the Philippines and was wondering if you might now what it is? Seems golden in body colour. Many thanks!
Signature: Frank

Jumping Spider we presume

Jumping Spider we presume

Dear Frank,
We wish your image had more detail.  This appears to be a Spider, and our best guess is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, however that is quite an unusual appendage at the end of the body.  We have not had any luck finding anything that matches this spider in appearance, but we will continue looking around on the web.

Hi Daniel and Frank:
You are right, Daniel, it is a Jumping Spider. It looks like a species of Mantisatta (Salticidae: Ballinae), a small genus with only two species. Mantisatta trucidans lives only on the island of Borneo and M. longicauda is endemic to the Philippines. According to Wikipedia “The genus name is combined from mantis (because of the long first legs) and the common salticid ending –attus”. The front legs in Frank’s photo don’t appear especially long but it looks like they may be folded under or perhaps around something. In all other respects it looks very similar to M. longicauda. The species name (longicauda) clearly refers to the unusually long and tail-like abdomen. Regards. Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you help me identify
Location: Southeastern kentucky
June 24, 2014 3:42 pm
What is this?? Looks like a spider but it has numerous antennae so I don’t know what it is
Signature: Shelby

Bold Jumper eats Arachnid

Bold Jumper eats Arachnid

Hi Shelby,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and they are considered harmless to humans.  Based on the green chelicerae and the markings, we believe your Jumping Spider is a Bold Jumper,
Phidippus audax, a highly variable species which is pictured on BugGuide.  What you have mistaken for numerous antennae are actually the legs of some Arachnid prey, perhaps a Harvestman in the order Opiliones.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination