Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orchard Spider?
Location: Chattanooga, TN
August 7, 2014 6:01 am
Hi!
I was wondering if this is an orchard spider. I first noticed it outside my front door and it was so tiny I couldn’t even get a picture of it. It was there for a couple of weeks, and was finally big enough to get a picture of if I zoomed in on it. It was still pretty small though. I believe it got blown away by a storm we had. I have just never seen anything like this spider and how shiny it was. I thought it was just beautiful and was sad to see it gone.
Signature: Dawn A

Orchard Spider

Orchard Spider

Dear Dawn A,
Just like the Eensy Weensy Spider of nursery rhyme fame, we believe the storm has merely washed your Orchard Spider to some other location in the garden.  Your identification of this beautiful and harmless spider is absolutely correct.  Some individuals have more orange markings than others.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue jumping spider??
Location: Austin, TX west hills
August 6, 2014 8:44 am
A friend, an arachnophobe no less, posted a pic of a beautiful tiny blue spider that looks like a jumping spider to me but I couldn’t find another matching it’s blueness anywhere online. Is this a really rare blue jumping spider?
Signature: LauraMaura

Blue Jumping Spider???

Blue Jumping Spider???

Dear LauraMaura,
How well do you know this friend?  Is your friend a practical joker?  Excuse us for being skeptical, but we have had submissions in the past that have tried to hoodwink us.  See here and here.  We believe this is a Cardinal Jumper,
Phidippus cardinalis, a species found in Texas, and we believe that the color has been altered in photoshop.  See BugGuide for an image of the Cardinal Jumper.  We know of no electric blue Jumping Spiders in North America.  We began our investigation by cropping much closer and then lightening and cropping a second time.  The edges around the spider do not look right.

Cropped Blue Jumping Spider:  Hoax or Not???

Cropped Blue Jumping Spider: Hoax or Not???

Blue Jumping Spider has questionable edges.

Blue Jumping Spider has questionable edges.

Then we found a similar Cardinal Jumper from our archives and we created a color altered version of the file, which we present side by side for comparison.  Click on the image to enlarge.  You judge:  Hoax or Not???

Cardinal Jumper:  Real and Enhanced color

Cardinal Jumper: Real and Enhanced color

Apparently his camera phone auto-adjusted and this is the color that the spider appeared in the photo, though the photographer says it was more black than blue in person.

Thanks for that information.  The overall color on the original is not true to nature, leaning toward cyan, which might make a black spider appear blue.  Black is a common color for a Jumping Spider.  This is definitely a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but there is not enough detail to determine the exact species.

 

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I Have 3 Pet Spiders and do not Know What to Feed Them
Location: Okanagan Region (Beach)
August 4, 2014 5:06 pm
Hi,
I’m Candace (13) and I have 3 “pet” spiders. I caught them all down in a shack in southern British Columbia. I’m curious to find out what kind of spiders they are and what I should be feeding them. They are all in different terrariums with shells at the bottom and I’m keeping them in my room. When it’s light out, I normally keep them in a luke-warm, dark area. Is that what they normally prefer? Could you please help me identify these spiders? They are very dear to me and I would be quite upset if they were to starve to death.
Thank you for your time.
Signature: -Candace

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Long Jawed Orbweaver

Dear Candace,
All of your spiders are species of Orbweavers, and they spin webs to snare prey.  You can feed them flies or other insects that you capture, or you can go to a pet store and purchase crickets to feed the spiders.  The file numbered 1820 appears to be a Long Jawed Orbweaver,
Tetragnatha versicolorand you can compare your pet to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, their food is “Primarily insects.”

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

Your other two spiders are Orbweavers in the family Araneidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  According to BugGuide, the “Food sources vary, but typically any small insects they catch in their webs. “

Orbweaver

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of bug is this?
Location: Newark, DE in the United States
August 5, 2014 11:46 am
My kids have been telling me about this crazy looking bug that has been eating bees in our back yard. But I have never seen one personally until today my son pointed one out with a bee captured in its mouth while both are captured in a spider Web! If you could identify this so I can explain to them I would greatly appreciate it alot. Plus for my knowledge also. Thank you greatly and Good bless.
Signature: Pyle Boys

Spider eats Hanging Thief eats Yellowjacket

Spider eats Hanging Thief eats Yellowjacket

Dear Pyle Boys,
We need to begin by telling you we love your documentation of a multi-link Food Chain.  We only wish your image was sharp enough and detailed enough for us to be able to identify the Spider.  The flying predator is a type of Robber Fly known as a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  The Hanging Thief gets its common name because it often hangs from one leg while eating the large winged prey, often bees or wasps, that it captures on the wing.  The prey in question is not a bee, but a Yellowjacket.

Multi-Link Food Chair:  Spider eats Fly eats Wasp

Multi-Link Food Chair: Spider eats Fly eats Wasp

I am gonna attach a few more pics of the spider close up and hopefully this can help. And thank you for clearing up the curiosity for me and my sons! And glad you like the food chain effect my son thought it was cool how life works. Thanks again!

Possibly Common House Spider

Possibly Common House Spider

Thanks for sending the additional images, but unfortunately, the images are not critically sharp and it also appears that the color is decidedly cyan/blue, which makes the subtle coloration on the spider difficult to distinguish.  The Hanging Thief and Yellowjacket were quite obvious, but not so with the spider, which may be a Common House Spider, Parasteatoda tepidariorum.  You can see the resemblance to this individual on Bugguide.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown arachnid
Location: Parker Texas
August 4, 2014 9:40 pm
I see a lot of bugs, thanks to my occupation I’m relieved to find this website.
Try this one guys.
Found in Parker Texas, in a garage. Mid summer, plenty of tall trees around the area.
Signature: -thank you kindly -Deej

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Hi Deej,
This is some species of Trapdoor Spider, and we believe it is a male.  It looks to us like it might be a Wafer-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Myrmekiaphila based on images posted to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Male Lady Bird Spider
Location: Valais, Switzerland
August 4, 2014 5:17 am
We discovered these male Lady Bird Spiders today in Cotterg, Valais, Switzerland. We looked them up online and were led to your website where we found out they are a rare and endangered spider. We saw THREE of them today, and wanted to share our photos with this wonderful site for others to enjoy this beautiful spider.
Signature: Swiss Sarah

Male Ladybird Spider

Male Ladybird Spider

Dear Swiss Sarah,
Thanks for sending your documentation of male Ladybird Spiders in Switzerland.  We guess it is mating season there as the brightly colored male Ladybird Spiders are out searching for the drastically different looking, sexually dimorphic female Ladybird Spiders that rarely leave their burrows.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination