Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nephila from Singapore
Geographic location of the bug:  Singapore
Date: 03/03/2018
Time: 06:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I read about the uncatalogued Nephila spider from Taiwan that was submitted by Dane Harris in 2011. Could you please help me identify a similar-looking spider from Singapore? Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  TanHK

Golden Silk Spider

Dear TanHK,
We located this image on FlickR, also from Singapore, that identifies a similar looking Golden Silk Spider as
Nephila piplipes, but we suspect that is a misspelling of Nephila pilipes as a nearly identical image is posted to Wikimedia Commons.  Most images identified as Nephila pilipes, including on iNaturalist, look quite different.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Balloon spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sao Paulo, Brazil (-22.79381, -44.37906)
Date: 02/20/2018
Time: 10:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I found this beautiful spider in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on 2012, 02/19. I would appreciate an identification.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Luis

Orbweaver

Dear Luis,
This is a pretty Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.  Our initial internet search did not turn up any visual matches, and we went through the Insetologia archives in an attempt to identify this species, but unsuccessfully.

Orbweaver

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we now know that this is an Orbweaver in the genus Bertrana, and we verified that on Project Noah.

Thanks Daniel!!!
WTB is the best!
Cheers!!
L.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spiders
Geographic location of the bug:  Sunnyside, Utah
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 11:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have been a fan of your page for many years. Whenever I seen and interesting bug I come here to investigate it. I have collected some bug photos that I just wanted to share.
How you want your letter signed:  Janice Leavitt

Orbweaver Spiderlings

Dear Janice,
Thank you for your kind words.  We really love your image of hatchling Orbweavers that have not yet dispersed.  We will do a separate posting of the Centipede you submitted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nephila species
Geographic location of the bug:  dunno
Date: 02/04/2018
Time: 12:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I visited the insect collection at the University of Minnesota and they had a very large Nephila that was totally green.  Since it’s not an insect they had not bothered with any provenance!  I have a thing for Nephila and have seen them on several continents, but never saw one like this.  Do you know a species or where it might be from?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  scott

Golden Silk Spider, but what species???

Dear Scott,
We are surprised the University of Minnesota could not provide you with at least a location where this impressive Golden Silk Spider was collected.  We suspect the colors might have changed from what they were when it was alive, but if anything, the green may have been even more vivid.  We will post your image and perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had scouring the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange big spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Bonito, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Date: 01/06/2018
Time: 06:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear WTB,
I found the attached orange spider in the rainforests of Rio Bonito, in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. More precisely, in (-22.660427,-42.592756):
https://www.google.com/maps/place/2239’36.5S+4235’33.7W/@-22.660427,-42.592756,18z/data=!3m1!1e3
It was big, with the body length of about 4cm. I’m attaching 3 pictures.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Luis A. Florit

Orbweaver: Eriophora fuliginea

Dear Luis,
This is one beautiful Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, a group of harmless Spiders that build orb webs in which to snare prey. Interestingly, we were able to identify your individual as
Eriophora fuliginea thanks to the ventral view of this image on FlickR.  There is a matching dorsal view on Gallery Kunzweb and another ventral view on The Natural World.  This really is quite a beautiful spider.

Orbweaver: Eriophora fuliginea

Dear Daniel,
Indeed, it was quite beautiful, I spent a long time shooting it because the light was bad. By the orange color I thought it wasn’t harmless, so I didn’t approach.
Thanks a lot for the identification! Your site and the whole idea is amazing.
Cheers!
L.

Orbweaver: Eriophora fuliginea

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this spider.
Geographic location of the bug:  London UK
Date: 01/13/2018
Time: 04:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What’s this one called? Less than size of 5p.
How you want your letter signed:  Steve

Walnut Orbweaver

Dear Steve,
This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and its black coloration is quite unusual.  We quickly identified it on UK Safari as a Walnut Orbweaver,
Nuctenea umbratica.  According to the site:  “Found mostly under the bark of dead trees, garden sheds, washing lines, and sometimes show up inside houses” and “Walnut Orb-weavers are quite timid and usually only venture out at night.  As the name suggests they catch their prey in a web.”  According to Euro Spiders:  “The Walnut orb-weaver, Nuctenea umbratica, is quite flat. It hides under cracks in the bark of trees during the days and spins a small orb web in the night. It can sustain as low temperatures as minus 19 degrees Celsius.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination