Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Austin texas
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 11:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I’ve seen this spider on my patio 3 nights in a row. The web must be set up quickly (it’s established sometime between when the sun goes down and when i go to bed) and the webs are gone the next morning when i get up. The webs are huge.  I have small children so i just want to make sure i don’t need to be concerned! I’ve had black widows on my patio in the past, so i am paranoid. 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Bug man? 🙂

Orbweaver

This is a harmless Orbweaver.  You have no reason for concern.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Jesup ga
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 06:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t know what this spider is I’ve never seen it in my life
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Golden Silk Spider

Commonly called a Golden Silk Spider, Nephila clavipes might bite if carelessly handled, but it is not an aggressive species and its bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White Banded Fishing Spider??
Geographic location of the bug:  Port Richey, Pasco County, FL
Date: 06/23/2018
Time: 08:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am usually able to figure out the cool creatures we find in our backyard (a bug thanks in part to your website), but with this webbing, I’m not quite sure.
How you want your letter signed:  Krsrksflordialife

Juvenile Writing Spider

Dear Krsrksflordialife,
Fishing Spiders do not build webs with which to snare prey, but rather they only build nursery webs for their young.  This is a juvenile Writing Spider, a name given to orbweavers that also spin intricate structures called stabilimenta within the web.  In our opinion, with the support of this BugGuide image, we believe your Writing Spider is an immature Golden Orbweaver,
Argiope aurantia.  Perhaps you are already familiar with the conspicuous adult Golden Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hello Spikey Crab Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia Beach VA
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 06:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have never seen this spider before. There are lumps of spider web all around it’s web. It looks like it has spikes and a shell.
How you want your letter signed:  Me!

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

This is a Crablike Spiny Orbweaver, a common species, especially in the South.  Like other members of the Orbweaver family, the Crablike Spiny Orbweaver is perfectly harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pile of spiders! What kind?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mill Valley, CA, Marin County, right outside San  Francisco, Northern CA
Date: 04/27/2018
Time: 03:45 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I was out on my deck and I saw this in a spider web. My husband decided to hit it with our bug zapper and TONS of baby spiders scattered everywhere. It freaked me out. I’ve never seen a nest like this before! From a distance it looked like a piece of a plant or tree.
First two pictures arr of them huddled together and second picture is of them scattering.
Sincerely,
How you want your letter signed:  Alison

Orbweaver Spiderlings

Dear Alison,
These are harmless Orbweaver spiderlings, and they are probably very recently hatched.  Young Orbweavers frequently disperse by ballooning away on the wind:  spinning a silk thread that catches the wind and transports the individual spiderlings great distances from where they hatched.

Obweaver Spiderlings Disperse

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orb Weaver
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 04/25/2018
Time: 06:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I found this beautiful spider in the center of its round web. It was in a bog in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, in stand of Cedar Trees. Also growing in the area were Pitch Pine, blueberry, lichen, and a variety of wetland plants.
The spider was small, maybe about a 1/4 inch long.  I found it today, April 25th.
These are my own photos.
Thanks very much!
How you want your letter signed:  Shawn McClure

Possibly Giant Lichen Orbweaver

Dear Shawn,
Our best guess is that this is a Giant Lichen Orbweaver, Araneus bicentenarius, which is pictured here on BugGuide and here on BugGuide.  Exact identification might prove difficult because based on the time of year, your location and the size you indicate, this is probably an immature individual that will mature in the fall.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Woodlands, on trees, among lichens.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination