Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of spider is this ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Falmouth, Cape Cod, Mass
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thank you for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  M. O”Neill

Marbled Orbweaver

Dear M.,
Yellow is one common color variation for the Marbled Orbweaver.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

You’re the best!  Thank you!
Apologies for brevity and any typos.  Message sent via mobile device.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Lichen Orbweaver Eating Breakfast
Geographic location of the bug:  High Springs, Fl.
Date: 07/22/2018
Time: 11:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I couldn’t resist sending this photo of a giant (and giant it was)  lichen orbweaver eating TWO beetles at once.  This is the first time my husband or I have ever seen one of these.  At night we watched it crawl up into a ball of moss in its web and skillfully snuggle in to it to hide.
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth (a.k.a . Butterfly Girl)

Giant Lichen Orbweaver with Prey

Dear Elizabeth,
Your images of a Giant Lichen Orbweaver with prey are an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  According to Bugs in the News:  “Some specimens of this species have been reported with abdomens measuring an inch or more in length, rivaling the size of the yellow garden spider (
Argiope aurantia). High rainfall levels have set the stage for large numbers of flying insects, like crickets and grasshoppers, to emerge during the summer and early fall months. They will then feed these spiders in such bounty that they will likely become quite large.”  As large Orweavers tend to go, we suspect the Golden Silk Spider might be the largest you might encounter in Florida.

Thank you, Daniel.  We have many large golden silk spiders on our property, as well.  We are quickly being overrun by spiders but not really bothered by it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unindentified Wasp kills large weaver spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Virginia, United States
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 04:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this bright blue- winged, orange bodied wasp? pulling a large weaver spider across the deck and then backwards (up a 20 foot chimney) until out of sight! Please help identify. We have four children in the home and would like to know if this is an aggressive species with a sting anything like a tarantula hawk?? It was upset at the close up photograph,on the deck, it let go of the spider and flew at me. I ran inside for a minute and it went back to the spider.
How you want your letter signed:  Naomi, Covington Virginia

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Naomi,
This Spider Wasp appears to be
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, and it is not an aggressive species.  While many wasps are capable of stinging, solitary species like this Spider Wasp very rarely sting people, and generally that happens only when they are carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Seen hiking
Geographic location of the bug:  On the hike to Jump Creek, outside Marsing, ID
Date: 07/13/2018
Time: 07:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this spider on it’s web over a creek, interested in what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks!!

Orbweaver

Your Spider is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and we believe it is an immature member of the genus Argiope, but we cannot be certain from this ventral view.  Orbweavers are not dangerous to humans.

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider subduing a Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Great Falls National Park, Great Falls, Virginia
Date: 07/08/2018
Time: 02:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I witnessed this butterfly being subdued by the spider, having being caught in it’s web, and I am having trouble identifying either the butterfly or the spider. I hope you can help me. In any case, certainly it was fascinating to watch. The butterfly ceased it’s struggles in about a minute.
How you want your letter signed:  Seth

Hackberry Emperor

Dear Seth,
Based on this BugGuide image, we feel confident this butterfly is a Hackberry Emperor,
Asterocampa celtis, though we acknowledge it might be a similar looking relative from the genus.  Because of the orb web, we are confident the Spider is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, but we cannot provide a species.  It looks immature, and it is often difficult to conclusively identify immature individuals.  In fact, it is also difficult to provide conclusive species identifications from adult Orbweavers.  Orbweavers pose no danger to humans.  They are docile spiders that spin webs, often very strong webs, and they wait patiently in the web to snare prey.  They rarely leave their webs. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange Spider in Tanzania
Geographic location of the bug:  Moshi, Tanzania
Date: 07/06/2018
Time: 08:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I am staying in moshi Tanzania and came across this spider, so I took a photo of it and want to know what it is, if you could help that would be great 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Spiny Orbweaver

This is a Spiny Orbweaver in the genus Gasteracantha.  Based on this FlickR image, it appears to be Gasteracantha versicolor. though the individual pictured on EcoTourismus has much longer spines.  There it is called the Long-Winged Kite Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination