Currently viewing the category: "Golden Silk Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Paramours of the arachnid persuasion
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbia, South Carolina, USA
Date: 10/16/2019
Time: 11:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, Bugman! I wanted to share this photo I took of (what I’m pretty certain are) Golden Silk Orbweavers. This lovely lady and her paramour have made their rather extensive home just outside my bathroom window. Her web is about 4 or 5 feet at its widest, plus the attaching guylines. Her body is about 3″ long and her legs make her even larger. He, on the other hand, barely makes it to 2″ with his legs. Her silk is a gorgeous yellow and looks quite fine in the sun.
How you want your letter signed:  Lissa Sprenne

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

Dear Lissa,
Thanks so much for submitting your excellent images of a pair of Golden Silk Spiders,
Nephila clavipes.  Your images nicely illustrate the beautiful golden color of the web.  The female Golden Silk Spider is approximately 50 times larger than her diminutive mate.

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Anastasia island, Florida
Date: 08/19/2019
Time: 08:43 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m pretty sure I know what this is, but would like a second opinion please!
How you want your letter signed:  JPerry

Golden Silk Spider

Dear JPerry,
The Golden Silk Spider,
Nephila clavipes, takes its common name from the golden color of the incredibly strong silk with which it weaves its web.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Jesup ga
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 06:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t know what this spider is I’ve never seen it in my life
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Golden Silk Spider

Commonly called a Golden Silk Spider, Nephila clavipes might bite if carelessly handled, but it is not an aggressive species and its bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nephila from Singapore
Geographic location of the bug:  Singapore
Date: 03/03/2018
Time: 06:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I read about the uncatalogued Nephila spider from Taiwan that was submitted by Dane Harris in 2011. Could you please help me identify a similar-looking spider from Singapore? Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  TanHK

Golden Silk Spider

Dear TanHK,
We located this image on FlickR, also from Singapore, that identifies a similar looking Golden Silk Spider as
Nephila piplipes, but we suspect that is a misspelling of Nephila pilipes as a nearly identical image is posted to Wikimedia Commons.  Most images identified as Nephila pilipes, including on iNaturalist, look quite different.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nephila species
Geographic location of the bug:  dunno
Date: 02/04/2018
Time: 12:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I visited the insect collection at the University of Minnesota and they had a very large Nephila that was totally green.  Since it’s not an insect they had not bothered with any provenance!  I have a thing for Nephila and have seen them on several continents, but never saw one like this.  Do you know a species or where it might be from?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  scott

Golden Silk Spider, but what species???

Dear Scott,
We are surprised the University of Minnesota could not provide you with at least a location where this impressive Golden Silk Spider was collected.  We suspect the colors might have changed from what they were when it was alive, but if anything, the green may have been even more vivid.  We will post your image and perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had scouring the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Jamaican spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Ocho Rios, Jamaica
Date: 01/10/2018
Time: 01:38 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman,
Wondered if you might identify this large spider spotted in Jamaica during a trip in December.  There were many of these spiders on the property but this was the largest that I could find.  Its body was maybe an inch and a half, with long thick legs.  Interestingly, much of the web, especially the thickest strands, were yellow!
Thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  Kyle

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Kyle,
This lovely lady is a Golden Silk Spider in the genus
Nephila, but she doesn’t look like Nephila clavipes, the only member of the genus found naturally in the New World.  All other members of the genus are found in Africa, Asia and the Pacific Islands.  Perhaps her markings are due to the Jamaican individuals having a closed gene pool, and they are developing into a subspecies, since the image on Sharp Photography looks exactly like your individual.  The name Golden Silk Spider refers to the very strong gold colored silk spun by members of the genus.  Golden Silk Spiders might bite if provoked, but they are considered harmless.

Golden Silk Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination