Currently viewing the category: "Golden Silk Spiders"
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Subject: John alexander salazar
Location: sur america-Colombia-cali-univalle
March 4, 2017 4:48 pm
hello mr.bugman, I have a question about a species of pehila found in my university, I know that in my university there are nephilas clavipes, but I would love it if I could get out of doubts about this species.
Signature: Nothing special

Golden Silk Spider

Dear John alexander,
The detail in your image is not ideal for species identification, but it is our understanding that the only native Golden Silk Spiders in the New World are all
Nephila clavipes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nephila madagascarenis
Location: South-East Madagascar
March 1, 2017 4:36 pm
Hi,
Came across this site while researching, couldn’t help but notice you were missing the Madagascan Golden Orb Weaver. I went to Madagascar last year and I was lucky enough to see a few of these beauties. Nephila is my favourite genus of spider and being from the UK, I don’t have any native to my area, so I was looking forward to seeing this, even more so than the lemurs! Please enjoy this snap, apologies for not so great picture quality.
Signature: Su

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Su,
Thanks so much for providing your image of a Golden Silk Spider in the genus Nephila from Madagascar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification Request
Location: East Africa
January 19, 2017 7:28 pm
Hi there,
Here are a few interesting ‘bugs’ I photographed while living in Tanzania between 2008 and 2011. Hoping you can help me (finally) identify exactly what they are 🙂
Many thanks
IMG 1515b in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Banded-Legged Golden Orb Web Spider

Dear Tom,
Based on an image posted to Africa Wild, we are confident that this is a Banded-Legged Golden Orb Web Spider,
Nephila senegalensis annulata.  There are also images posted to iSpot.  In the past week, we have made six identifications for you and it is quite curious that we have yet to hear back with your appreciation of our research.

Hello Daniel,
Apologies for not replying earlier, I have been away travelling with no access to internet and so this was a wonderful surprise to find on my return!
Thank-you very much for identifying these insects. There were many others of interest during my time in East Africa, and I only wish I had my camera with me more often. However, it has served to develop my interest and so I am more observant these days with what I find around me wherever I am in the world. And knowing the correct species ameks a world of difference to conducting further research and learning more about these fascinating creatures.
I have been enjoying browsing your website and think you offer a fantastic service, so I hope you enjoy the identification process too as you help people like me.
Did you manage to identify the last individual (attached)? It too was quite spectacular! (seen in Arusha, Tanzania late 2008)
Kind regards,
Tom

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very large spider
Location: south Mississippi
October 22, 2016 3:32 pm
I’m wondering what this spider is. Living in Mississippi, I have seen 3 of them so far and always around fall. This one is very large! The leg span could easily spread across my palm (about 3in across, 4in length), possibly grab around it a little. It’s abdomen is approx. 2-2 1/2 inches long, not including the head part. As you can see it seems to be a tan-ish color with yellow spots and yellow and black legs. Not sure if you’ve ever played Zelda, but the head part looks like the “skull spiders” on the game. We’ve just been referring to it like that Lol The web it’s made is huge, at least 3ft for just the circle. Happy to say it’s not running around or bugging anyone, yet. It’s web has been down a couple times (not by us, sticks and weather), it keeps rebuilding it right where it’s been, guess it’s eating well there. Is it poisonous? Should I be worried? I have 3 kids that love watching it but just want to be sure it’s safe.
Signature: Kate

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Kate,
Autumn is the time that Orbweavers, that only live for a year, reach maturity and as they reach full size, become much more visible.  Your individual is a female Golden Silk Spider,
Nephila clavipes, and though large individuals might bite if provoked and though they have venom, they are not considered dangerous.  Orbweavers are not aggressive, and they are relatively helpless outside of their webs, so they rarely leave the web.  Teach your children to respect this stunning spider, and we don’t believe you will have any need to worry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden Silk Spider respite
Location: Charleston, SC
October 18, 2016 5:21 pm
Thought you might enjoy this image. This gal had been residing beside the house for some time when we had an unexpected cold spell. She was pretty lethargic in the web and I thought she might fall prey to a blue jay or something. So, I brought her inside for a couple of days until it warmed back up. She seemed fine when I took her back out, she remade her web and, I think made an egg sack (her abdomen had diminished greatly in size one day not too long after). Here’s to hopes for the next generation.
Signature: Norm Shea

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Norm,
Your kindness to this Golden Silk Spider definitely deserves the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We hope you have future generations in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What big spider is this?
Location: Wrightsville
July 31, 2016 4:08 am
I saw this spider this morning on Wrightsville Beach, NC. It’s thorax is about 1.5 to 1.75 inches and the legs extend another 1.5 inches.
A multicolored thorax (brown with white spots) and legs with dark fur on the joints.
Love to tell the kiddos here at the beach house what kinds of spider they found.
Thanks!
Signature: Curious Beach Bum

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Curious Beach Bum,
This Golden Silk Spider,
Nephila clavipes, gets its common name from the color of its incredibly strong silk.  North Carolina is the northernmost point of its range, according to BugGuide, which continues as far south as Argentina.  More information is available on BugGuide where it states:  “Like other spiders, this one will bite in self-defense, especially if you go out of your way to provoke it (in particular, by handling or picking it up). Spiders have venom which enables them to incapacitate their prey. However, the bite of most species is described as much less severe than a bee sting.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination