Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Everglade City Florida
Date: 04/30/2019
Time: 09:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
Friends of mine in Everglade City sent me this image of a very cool spider. It’s the size of a pinky fingernail. It was seen on their kitchen counter (eek??) in Everglade City Florida…Any help you can give is truly appreciated. (I’m better with insects than arachnids)
Thanks!!
How you want your letter signed:  Katja

Green Orbweaver

Dear Katja,
The best we can do at this time is to provide a general family name.  This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.

Thank you Daniel,
They will be happy to hear it is harmless, since they turned it loose in their yard! Any further information would be appreciated…it really is a cool looking spider,
Katja
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Dawesville, western Australia.
Date: 01/19/2019
Time: 08:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there can you please help me identify this Spider. It disappears during the day and on dusk creates a beautiful web everyday. The web is always built in the same place between our house and lemon  tree. Its bright orange with no distinct pattern on the top of the abdomen.
Tonight was the first night I have noticed her hanging in a few lines of web but has not create d one. After looking around I have spotted another smaller orange Spider which I assume is a male. I have attached pictures of both
How you want your letter signed:  Stephanie

Garden Orbweaver

Dear Stephanie,
This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae.  We believe it is a Garden Orbweaver, (
Eriophora transmarina or Araneus transmarina) which is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site where it states:  “Garden Orb Web Spiders are nocturnal spiders. They are large size spiders. The mature female spiders are about 50mm (leg to leg) in size. Males are a bit smaller, about 25mm leg to leg. The spiders are brown in colour with variety patterns on their flat abdomen. They build vertical orb web in garden and bushland. The spiders sit in the middle of the web and waiting for insects in night time. They build webs between trees or shrubs. The webs are usually one meter in diameter and about one or two meters above ground. The spider leaves a hole at the centre of the web.  Garden Orb Web Spiders build webs after sunset and move into retreat during the day time. The retreat can be leaves or tree trunks near by. When they rest, their legs fold up tightly against its body. If their webs are not damaged, they may leave the webs for next night, or they keep the silk material by eating them all before sun rise. When they collect the web silks, usually they will leave the top silk, the bridge thread. (There are some advantages for the spiders to leave the bridge thread on site.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  what is this spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  mindanao, philippines
Date: 01/16/2019
Time: 07:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hi.. my daughter found this kind of spider which becomes her pet but we cant identify what kind of spidrr is this..hope you can help us..thanks..
How you want your letter signed:  Jean

Tree Stump Spider

Dear Jean,
In our opinion, this is not a Spider, but rather a Harvestman, a group of Arachnids in the order Opiliones.  Harvestmen do not have venom, so they are not a threat to humans.  Alas, we have not been able to find any matching images online, so we cannot verify the species identity of your Harvestman.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Christoper, who provided a link to Flying Kiwi, we now believe this IS a Spider, possibly a species of Orbweaver.

Update:  February 3, 3019
Thanks to a comment from frequent contributor Karl with links, we now believe we have a species identification for this Tree Stump Spider, Poltys illepidus.  Here is an image from Life Unseen.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  The great pumpkin
Geographic location of the bug:  central NJ
Date: 10/31/2018
Time: 09:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t have a clue, but it’s about as big as the orb-spinning house spider, and orange for halloween! Descended on silk from a tree. Is that an egg sac, or an abdomen?
How you want your letter signed:  LH

Pumpkin Spider

Dear LH,
We don’t know if you are serious about your subject line, but this does appear to be a Pumpkin Spider, which is how the orange color variation of the Marbled Orbweaver,
Araneus marmoreus, is often called.  Though the Pumpkin Spider was already our Bug of the Month for December 2013, we feel that enough time has passed to honor it again, so your submission will be featured as our Bug of the Month for November 2018.  Like other Orbweavers, though there is a possibility that a large individual might inflict a bite, the Marbled Orbweaver is considered harmless.  The large abdomen of this female indicates she might still have to produce an egg sac or two before winter.

Pumpkin Spider

Thanks so much!
I’m interested in what type of webs it spins- the usual big bullseye?
This one was inside for a few days!

Is it possibly a seasonal color variation?
LH
Hi again LH,
Yes, they build a similar orb web.  The color variation is not seasonal, but the spiders mature and become noticeable in the fall.  The hatchling spiders that emerge in the spring are very tiny and easy to overlook.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellow Garden Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Bluff, Illinois
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 09:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I work in a landscape garden and we get lots of spiders, mostly cross spiders, so I was happy to come across this beauty.  I grew up having them in my mom’s garden,  so it really did make me smile. Hopefully the pictures are worthy of sharing.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin

Banded Garden Orbweaver

Dear Karin,
Your images of a Banded Garden Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata, are beautiful.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Open areas, old fields, etc. with tall grass. Webs tend to be more hidden than those of aurantia, and the preferred habitat is said to be drier.”

Banded Garden Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Argiope bruennichi?
Geographic location of the bug:  São Brás, Algarve, Portugal
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 07:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We spotted this spider on the wall outside the door of a villa we were staying in, in the Algarve in Portugal – a very remote location surrounded by nothing but olive groves and hills, accessible only by a dirt road. It appeared quite suddenly in the morning, as we were leaving, and we hadn’t noticed it before anywhere inside or outside during our week-long stay. We’ve never seen a spider like this in Portugal before (usually just lots of lizards and the odd snake!), especially not with  an almost crab-like body and a nest/egg sac? A little Googling suggests it might be a wasp spider, but do you know for sure?
Thank you for your time and for any help you can give!
All the best,
Amelia

Orbweaver

Dear Amelia,
In our opinion, you have the genus correct but not the species for your Orbweaver.  We believe, based on this Age Fotostock image that your spider is
Argiope lobata.  Images on iNaturalist and ArachnoPhoto support that ID.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination