Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  On my house
Date: 09/14/2017
Time: 10:17 PM EDT
It built a web across a large window. It was just sitting calmly against the window corner when I spotted it.
How you want your letter signed —
Lucy Lancaster

Orbweaver

Dear Lucy,
This is a harmless Orbweaver Spider, possibly a Western Spotted Orbweaver based on this BugGuide image, but since we don’t know if your house is in Australia or Los Angeles, we cannot be certain of the species.  Orbweaver are passive hunters that spin an orb web and then wait passively for prey to become ensnared.

Thank you Daniel!  I’m in Arizona 🙂
This spider is so colorful.  Sometimes I see it in the middle of the web and sometimes on the side.  So interesting!

Lucy Lancaster

Thanks for the update Lucy.  Your Arizona location lends credibility to our identification of the Western Spotted Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Spider
Location: South Dakota
September 14, 2017 7:40 pm
We found this spider in our garage. Any idea of what it could be? We live in Mitchell, South Dakota.
Signature: Sincerely, The Pospisil Family

Orbweaver

Dear Pospisil Family,
This is a harmless Orbweaver Spider.  As autumn approaches, Orbweaver Spiders mature and reach adult size, when they begin to attract attention.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Burnham Pennsylvania
Date: 09/10/2017
Time: 04:26 PM EDT
What kind of bug is this.? Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  I just want to know what it is

Golden Orbweaver

The Golden Orbweaver is a Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Classic Orb Web
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 18, 2017 9:17 am
The early morning sunlight is beautifully captured on the silken strands of this Tree Spider web,
Araneus gemma, a common species in the Los Angeles area.  Both the size of the spiders and the size of their webs is increasing as summer wanes.  According to BugGuide:  “Builds web in open areas of trees, large shrubs and around houses.”  The Natural History of Orange County site lacks information, but does provide the common name Tree Spider.  According to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles:  ” locally we have one very common species; A. gemma, perhaps the heaviest north American orb weaver. It’s round, humped abdomen is usually pale colored, tan yellow or greenish, with a single thin median white stripe. It builds a large orb from trees and buildings in moister parts of the valleys and canyons, spending the day hiding in a loose nest made of leaves and silk, usually under an overhanging ledge or branch.”  We have been observing these spiders for years, and large individuals often spin webs at night near lights and between shrubs in paths in our garden.  The spiders are active nocturnally and hide during the day.

Orb Web

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Camarines Sur, Philippines
August 19, 2017 6:14 am
Can you please identify this spider I found in our school? I need his to be identified today for our project. Thanks.
Signature: Gwnypasadilla

Orbweaver: Argiope appensa

Dear Gwnypasadilla,
This is an Orbweaver in the genus
Argiope.  Our research led us to this Wikimedia Commons image of Argiope appensa, and we verified that on Project Noah where the St Andrew’s Cross Spider this information is provided:  “Locally know here in the Philippines as ‘Gagambang Ekis’ or literally translated as X spider. The abdomen looks like a face mask.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scary orb web spider
Location: Bangalore, India
August 19, 2017 2:12 am
Dear bugman,
First up, congratulations for the work that you do. I found an orb weaver near my place. But it’s patterns don’t match up to any orb weavers on the internet. Please take a look at it
Signature: Gautam dikshit

Orbweaver

Dear Gautam,
This is an Orbweaver in the genus Argiope, a group sometimes called Writing Spiders because of the zigzag stabilimentum woven into the web.  It might be
Argiope anasuja, which is pictured on the Orb Web Spiders of India site where it states:  “Argiope anasuja is a species of Orb spider found in Asia ranging from Pakistan to the Maldives. Like other species of the same genus, it builds a web with a zig-zag stabilimentum. The mature female of A. anasuja always rests at the centre of the orb with her head facing downwards. The orb has an opening at the centre and when disturbed she goes through the hole and exits on the other side of the plane of the web.”  Another very similar looking species found in India and pictured on Alamy is Argiope pulchella.

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination