Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellow Garden Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Bluff, Illinois
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 09:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I work in a landscape garden and we get lots of spiders, mostly cross spiders, so I was happy to come across this beauty.  I grew up having them in my mom’s garden,  so it really did make me smile. Hopefully the pictures are worthy of sharing.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin

Banded Garden Orbweaver

Dear Karin,
Your images of a Banded Garden Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata, are beautiful.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Open areas, old fields, etc. with tall grass. Webs tend to be more hidden than those of aurantia, and the preferred habitat is said to be drier.”

Banded Garden Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Argiope bruennichi?
Geographic location of the bug:  São Brás, Algarve, Portugal
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 07:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We spotted this spider on the wall outside the door of a villa we were staying in, in the Algarve in Portugal – a very remote location surrounded by nothing but olive groves and hills, accessible only by a dirt road. It appeared quite suddenly in the morning, as we were leaving, and we hadn’t noticed it before anywhere inside or outside during our week-long stay. We’ve never seen a spider like this in Portugal before (usually just lots of lizards and the odd snake!), especially not with  an almost crab-like body and a nest/egg sac? A little Googling suggests it might be a wasp spider, but do you know for sure?
Thank you for your time and for any help you can give!
All the best,
Amelia

Orbweaver

Dear Amelia,
In our opinion, you have the genus correct but not the species for your Orbweaver.  We believe, based on this Age Fotostock image that your spider is
Argiope lobata.  Images on iNaturalist and ArachnoPhoto support that ID.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of spider is this ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Falmouth, Cape Cod, Mass
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thank you for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  M. O”Neill

Marbled Orbweaver

Dear M.,
Yellow is one common color variation for the Marbled Orbweaver.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

You’re the best!  Thank you!
Apologies for brevity and any typos.  Message sent via mobile device.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Lichen Orbweaver Eating Breakfast
Geographic location of the bug:  High Springs, Fl.
Date: 07/22/2018
Time: 11:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I couldn’t resist sending this photo of a giant (and giant it was)  lichen orbweaver eating TWO beetles at once.  This is the first time my husband or I have ever seen one of these.  At night we watched it crawl up into a ball of moss in its web and skillfully snuggle in to it to hide.
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth (a.k.a . Butterfly Girl)

Giant Lichen Orbweaver with Prey

Dear Elizabeth,
Your images of a Giant Lichen Orbweaver with prey are an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  According to Bugs in the News:  “Some specimens of this species have been reported with abdomens measuring an inch or more in length, rivaling the size of the yellow garden spider (
Argiope aurantia). High rainfall levels have set the stage for large numbers of flying insects, like crickets and grasshoppers, to emerge during the summer and early fall months. They will then feed these spiders in such bounty that they will likely become quite large.”  As large Orweavers tend to go, we suspect the Golden Silk Spider might be the largest you might encounter in Florida.

Thank you, Daniel.  We have many large golden silk spiders on our property, as well.  We are quickly being overrun by spiders but not really bothered by it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unindentified Wasp kills large weaver spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Western Virginia, United States
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 04:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this bright blue- winged, orange bodied wasp? pulling a large weaver spider across the deck and then backwards (up a 20 foot chimney) until out of sight! Please help identify. We have four children in the home and would like to know if this is an aggressive species with a sting anything like a tarantula hawk?? It was upset at the close up photograph,on the deck, it let go of the spider and flew at me. I ran inside for a minute and it went back to the spider.
How you want your letter signed:  Naomi, Covington Virginia

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Naomi,
This Spider Wasp appears to be
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, and it is not an aggressive species.  While many wasps are capable of stinging, solitary species like this Spider Wasp very rarely sting people, and generally that happens only when they are carelessly handled.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Seen hiking
Geographic location of the bug:  On the hike to Jump Creek, outside Marsing, ID
Date: 07/13/2018
Time: 07:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this spider on it’s web over a creek, interested in what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks!!

Orbweaver

Your Spider is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and we believe it is an immature member of the genus Argiope, but we cannot be certain from this ventral view.  Orbweavers are not dangerous to humans.

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination