Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
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Subject: Identification Request
Location: East Africa
January 19, 2017 7:28 pm
Hi there,
Here are a few interesting ‘bugs’ I photographed while living in Tanzania between 2008 and 2011. Hoping you can help me (finally) identify exactly what they are 🙂
Many thanks
IMG 1515b in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Banded-Legged Golden Orb Web Spider

Dear Tom,
Based on an image posted to Africa Wild, we are confident that this is a Banded-Legged Golden Orb Web Spider,
Nephila senegalensis annulata.  There are also images posted to iSpot.  In the past week, we have made six identifications for you and it is quite curious that we have yet to hear back with your appreciation of our research.

Hello Daniel,
Apologies for not replying earlier, I have been away travelling with no access to internet and so this was a wonderful surprise to find on my return!
Thank-you very much for identifying these insects. There were many others of interest during my time in East Africa, and I only wish I had my camera with me more often. However, it has served to develop my interest and so I am more observant these days with what I find around me wherever I am in the world. And knowing the correct species ameks a world of difference to conducting further research and learning more about these fascinating creatures.
I have been enjoying browsing your website and think you offer a fantastic service, so I hope you enjoy the identification process too as you help people like me.
Did you manage to identify the last individual (attached)? It too was quite spectacular! (seen in Arusha, Tanzania late 2008)
Kind regards,
Tom

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Taiwan
Location: Hsinchu County, Taiwan
January 22, 2017 6:29 am
Forgive me if this has already been asked. I live in the countryside of northern Taiwan and spend most mornings running through the hills and mountains as well as farm areas. I take photos as I go.
I have found a spider that seems to spin an x-shaped web. There are so many interesting insects I see in the mountains here that I can’t identify, but this has been the most interesting.
Thanks much for your time!
Signature: paulawanda

Orbweaver

Dear paulawanda,
This magnificent spider is an Orbweaver in the genus
Argiope.  Spiders in that genus are sometimes called Writing Spiders because of the elaborate designs, called stabilimenta, that are woven in their webs.  Many members of the genus are pictured on Wongchunxing.com where Argiope aetheroides looks like a good visual match to your individual.  Insectoid.info indicates “18 Species in Argiopinae for Taiwan listed.”

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in my garden
Location: Southern Colorado, USA
January 9, 2017 9:25 am
Hello!
I found this beautiful spider the summer before last and realized I still had and image of it but was not able to properly identify it. I found it mid August in southern Colorado.
Signature: Christopher Salazar

Golden Orbweaver

Dear Christopher,
Your Golden Orbweaver, Argiope aurantia, is of the genus commonly called Writing Spiders because of the stabilimentum woven into the web.

Stabilomentum of a Golden Orbweaver

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Subject: (Miami) Weird spider looks like it has 4 legs because it holds them together. What is this?
Location: Miami Florida
January 3, 2017 1:16 pm
I’ve lived in Florida most of my entire life. I’ve never seen anything like this! My fiance is currently in Miami and he snapped these photos. He guessed it was a golden orb weaver of some sorts, but I think not. WHAT in the world is this?
Signature: Sara

Silver Argiope

Dear Sara,
The Silver Argiope is a relatively common, harmless Orbweaver in its range, including Southern states like Florida, Texas and California, through Central America and into South America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: uruguay
December 9, 2016 10:21 am
Hi I was hoping you could identify this spider. There are a lot of them that live out in the field. As you can see in the 2nd photo they often have thick webs in a zig-zag extending from where they put their legs. Thanks.
Signature: Louis

Silver Argiope

Silver Argiope

Dear Louis,
This is an Orbweaver, and it really resembles a North American species
Argiope argentata, the Silver Argiope, which BugGuide states is found in:  “CA, TX, FL (mostly in southernmost parts of those states). There’s also one data point from AZ.”  The zigzag web you mention is known as the stabilimentum, and many scientists believe it helps to camouflage the spiders in the web, and the presence of the stabilimentum gives spiders in the genus Argiope the common name Writing Spiders.  According to Colnect, the Silver Argiope was pictured on a stamp from Uruguay in 2009, which is good evidence the range extends well into South America.  According to EcoRegistros, the species is known as the Araña Tigre or Tiger Spider for our English only speakers.  We will be postdating this submission to go live at the end of the month while our staff is away from the office for the holidays.

Writing Spider:  Argiope argentata

Writing Spider: Argiope argentata

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Del Mar, CA, 1/2 mile from ocean
December 4, 2016 11:59 pm
We’ve seen this spider in our front yard in the same place for about three months. It seems to have a yellow outline of an hourglass on its belly. We’d like to know what kind of spider it is and if it’s poisonous.
Signature: Matthew Lee

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Dear Matthew,
This beautiful Silver Garden Orbweaver,
Argiope argentata, is considered harmless, though large individuals might bite if carelessly handled.  Most spiders are venomous, though very few have a venom powerful enough to threaten humans.

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Thanks very much!  I’m glad it’s considered harmless.  We will leave it alone then.
–Matt

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination