Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Seen hiking
Geographic location of the bug:  On the hike to Jump Creek, outside Marsing, ID
Date: 07/13/2018
Time: 07:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this spider on it’s web over a creek, interested in what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks!!

Orbweaver

Your Spider is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and we believe it is an immature member of the genus Argiope, but we cannot be certain from this ventral view.  Orbweavers are not dangerous to humans.

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider subduing a Butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Great Falls National Park, Great Falls, Virginia
Date: 07/08/2018
Time: 02:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I witnessed this butterfly being subdued by the spider, having being caught in it’s web, and I am having trouble identifying either the butterfly or the spider. I hope you can help me. In any case, certainly it was fascinating to watch. The butterfly ceased it’s struggles in about a minute.
How you want your letter signed:  Seth

Hackberry Emperor

Dear Seth,
Based on this BugGuide image, we feel confident this butterfly is a Hackberry Emperor,
Asterocampa celtis, though we acknowledge it might be a similar looking relative from the genus.  Because of the orb web, we are confident the Spider is an Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, but we cannot provide a species.  It looks immature, and it is often difficult to conclusively identify immature individuals.  In fact, it is also difficult to provide conclusive species identifications from adult Orbweavers.  Orbweavers pose no danger to humans.  They are docile spiders that spin webs, often very strong webs, and they wait patiently in the web to snare prey.  They rarely leave their webs. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange Spider in Tanzania
Geographic location of the bug:  Moshi, Tanzania
Date: 07/06/2018
Time: 08:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I am staying in moshi Tanzania and came across this spider, so I took a photo of it and want to know what it is, if you could help that would be great 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Email

Spiny Orbweaver

This is a Spiny Orbweaver in the genus Gasteracantha.  Based on this FlickR image, it appears to be Gasteracantha versicolor. though the individual pictured on EcoTourismus has much longer spines.  There it is called the Long-Winged Kite Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Austin texas
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 11:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I’ve seen this spider on my patio 3 nights in a row. The web must be set up quickly (it’s established sometime between when the sun goes down and when i go to bed) and the webs are gone the next morning when i get up. The webs are huge.  I have small children so i just want to make sure i don’t need to be concerned! I’ve had black widows on my patio in the past, so i am paranoid. 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Bug man? 🙂

Orbweaver

This is a harmless Orbweaver.  You have no reason for concern.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Jesup ga
Date: 07/05/2018
Time: 06:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t know what this spider is I’ve never seen it in my life
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Golden Silk Spider

Commonly called a Golden Silk Spider, Nephila clavipes might bite if carelessly handled, but it is not an aggressive species and its bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White Banded Fishing Spider??
Geographic location of the bug:  Port Richey, Pasco County, FL
Date: 06/23/2018
Time: 08:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am usually able to figure out the cool creatures we find in our backyard (a bug thanks in part to your website), but with this webbing, I’m not quite sure.
How you want your letter signed:  Krsrksflordialife

Juvenile Writing Spider

Dear Krsrksflordialife,
Fishing Spiders do not build webs with which to snare prey, but rather they only build nursery webs for their young.  This is a juvenile Writing Spider, a name given to orbweavers that also spin intricate structures called stabilimenta within the web.  In our opinion, with the support of this BugGuide image, we believe your Writing Spider is an immature Golden Orbweaver,
Argiope aurantia.  Perhaps you are already familiar with the conspicuous adult Golden Orbweaver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination