Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
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Subject: Spider in my garden
Location: Southern Colorado, USA
January 9, 2017 9:25 am
Hello!
I found this beautiful spider the summer before last and realized I still had and image of it but was not able to properly identify it. I found it mid August in southern Colorado.
Signature: Christopher Salazar

Golden Orbweaver

Dear Christopher,
Your Golden Orbweaver, Argiope aurantia, is of the genus commonly called Writing Spiders because of the stabilimentum woven into the web.

Stabilomentum of a Golden Orbweaver

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Subject: (Miami) Weird spider looks like it has 4 legs because it holds them together. What is this?
Location: Miami Florida
January 3, 2017 1:16 pm
I’ve lived in Florida most of my entire life. I’ve never seen anything like this! My fiance is currently in Miami and he snapped these photos. He guessed it was a golden orb weaver of some sorts, but I think not. WHAT in the world is this?
Signature: Sara

Silver Argiope

Dear Sara,
The Silver Argiope is a relatively common, harmless Orbweaver in its range, including Southern states like Florida, Texas and California, through Central America and into South America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: uruguay
December 9, 2016 10:21 am
Hi I was hoping you could identify this spider. There are a lot of them that live out in the field. As you can see in the 2nd photo they often have thick webs in a zig-zag extending from where they put their legs. Thanks.
Signature: Louis

Silver Argiope

Silver Argiope

Dear Louis,
This is an Orbweaver, and it really resembles a North American species
Argiope argentata, the Silver Argiope, which BugGuide states is found in:  “CA, TX, FL (mostly in southernmost parts of those states). There’s also one data point from AZ.”  The zigzag web you mention is known as the stabilimentum, and many scientists believe it helps to camouflage the spiders in the web, and the presence of the stabilimentum gives spiders in the genus Argiope the common name Writing Spiders.  According to Colnect, the Silver Argiope was pictured on a stamp from Uruguay in 2009, which is good evidence the range extends well into South America.  According to EcoRegistros, the species is known as the Araña Tigre or Tiger Spider for our English only speakers.  We will be postdating this submission to go live at the end of the month while our staff is away from the office for the holidays.

Writing Spider:  Argiope argentata

Writing Spider: Argiope argentata

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Del Mar, CA, 1/2 mile from ocean
December 4, 2016 11:59 pm
We’ve seen this spider in our front yard in the same place for about three months. It seems to have a yellow outline of an hourglass on its belly. We’d like to know what kind of spider it is and if it’s poisonous.
Signature: Matthew Lee

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Dear Matthew,
This beautiful Silver Garden Orbweaver,
Argiope argentata, is considered harmless, though large individuals might bite if carelessly handled.  Most spiders are venomous, though very few have a venom powerful enough to threaten humans.

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Silver Garden Orbweaver

Thanks very much!  I’m glad it’s considered harmless.  We will leave it alone then.
–Matt

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Ontario Canada
Location: Goderich Ontario
November 18, 2016 5:33 pm
Found this spider on the wall outside work today. Was pretty docile, and no web in sight, but quite pretty! Got several pictures from different angles, so I’m really hoping they’re good enough. I included one zoomed out photo to try and indicate scale. I’m thinking he must’ve been in one of the shipments we got this week since we’re setting up a new store, but either way he was an awesome spider to see!
Signature: Laurie

Banded Garden Orbweaver

Banded Garden Orbweaver

Dear Laurie,
This is a Banded Garden Orbweaver or Banded Argiope,
Argiope trifasciata, and it is a local species for you as it ranges over most of North America.  Orbweavers mature in a single season, hatching in the spring and growing through the summer, attaining maturity and full size in the fall when they generally attract all the attention.  Like other members of the family, this Banded Garden Orbweaver spends most of its time in its web, unless the web is destroyed or it is pursued by a predator.  Orbweavers are perfectly harmless, though a large individual is capable of biting.  The venom should have little more effect than local swelling and tenderness.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of spider is this??
Location: St. Catharines, Ontario
November 8, 2016 8:37 am
Hi there,
I’m hoping you help me out by telling me what kind of spider I found at my house.
Signature: Doesn’t matter

Shamrock Spider

Shamrock Spider

This is a harmless female Orbweaver, and though we sometimes have problems with species identifications in the family, we are confident this is a Shamrock Spider, Araneus trifolium, a species found throughout the northern regions of North America.  Here is a matching BugGuide image, also from Ontario.  According to BugGuide:  “Araneus trifolium female occurs in a variety of colors.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination