Currently viewing the category: "Orb Weavers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification of strange insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Starkville, MS
Date: 10/22/2017
Time: 01:33 PM EDT
I found this crab-like spider maybe? That’s what it looks like anyway I was too scared to count the legs. The web was thick green and not silky like a spider web
How you want your letter signed:  Alexandra B

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

Dear Alexandra,
The Crablike Spiny Orbweaver is spider that poses no threat to humans.  The spider has variable coloration in shades of black, white, red and yellow.  According to BugGuide:  “This species of spider does not live very long. In fact, the lifespan only lasts until reproduction, which usually takes place the spring following the winter when they hatched. Females die after producing an egg mass, and males die six days after a complete cycle of sperm induction to the female”
and “This spider adds little tufts of silk to its web. According to Florida’s Fabulous Spiders ‘these little flags serve a warning function to prevent birds from flying into the web, destroying it.‘”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Argiope egg cases, black widow?
Geographic location of the bug:  Memphis, TN
Date: 10/19/2017
Time: 01:25 PM EDT
The argiope I sent a photo of in March disappeared (died/was eaten?) a week or two ago. I thought you might want to see the egg cases she left for next spring.
I also include a photo of what I believe is a black widow. (I couldn’t get a shot of the side with the red on it.)
How you want your letter signed:  Laurel

Egg Sacs of a Golden Orbweaver

Dear Laurel,
We did receive an image of a Golden Orbweaver from you in August.  Thanks for sending images of her egg sacs.  Orbweavers are short-lived spiders, living only a single season.  Your other spider does appear to be a Widow. 

Sorry about the date mix-up. I first saw the spider in March.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Arizona, USA
Date: 10/14/2017
Time: 03:46 PM EDT
Please identify this spider for me  I’ve moved into the mountains from the desert and finding a while new world of insects
How you want your letter signed:  John Anderson

Orbweaver

Dear John,
This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and based on images posted to BugGuide and Spiders.Us where it states:  “Habitat:  Web is often constructed on buildings and other man-made structures, especially near outdoor lights. You can also find this orbweaver in shrubs and open woodland areas, though they are not common among tall grasses.  Web:  Large, vertical, orb-shaped web is usually built at least a few feet off the ground amid shrubs, trees, fences, buildings, etc; they are opportunistic and will use whatever ‘framework’ they can. Moulder (1992) notes that the web can be as much as six to eight feet off the ground. The diameter of the web is about 2 feet or less; it has about 27 radii and 63 spiral threads, as reported by Kaston (1977). Web may be attached to buildings or fences in urban and suburban areas. The spider occupies the hub (center) of the web, hanging head down, during the night; it usually hides during the day, though in the summer or fall when they are full-grown, they may spend some daylight hours in the web, as well. Like many orbweavers, this species takes down its web each morning by eating it, thus recycling the proteins within it and using them to re-build a fresh web for the night.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Minnesota spider with “v” markings?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hennepin County, Minnesota
Date: 10/10/2017
Time: 05:37 PM EDT
I found this spider on a building next to the Mississippi River in early October. I thought identifying it would be easy because of the clear “v” markings on the abdomen and thorax and large pedipalps, but I can’t find it anywhere! It ran away before I could get a picture of its eye arrangement, but I estimate it was about 1.5-1.75 inches long (including legs).
How you want your letter signed:  Eli

Male Orbweaver

Dear Eli,
This looks to us like a male Orbweaver, probably in the genus
Araneus.  It looks similar to the male Barn Spider posted to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Super cool spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Ontario, Canada
Date: 10/05/2017
Time: 12:04 PM EDT
We found this beautiful lady while on a walk- she is pretty striking but looks a little different than our native yellow and black garden spider. Can you confirm the type? I have been googling and those stripes sure look an awful lot like a wasp spider.
How you want your letter signed:  JJ

Banded Orbweaver is double amputee

Dear JJ,
This is a Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata, and it is a different species in the same genus as the Golden Orbweaver, Argiope aurantia.  Members of the genus are also called Writing Spiders because of the intricate, often zig-zag stabilimentum that is woven into the web, probably to help camouflage the spider while it waits for prey.  It appears that your individual is a double amputee as she is missing two of her front legs.

Banded Orbweaver missing two front legs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  (Red) golden orb weaver?
Geographic location of the bug:  Mexico, Riviera Maya
Date: 10/06/2017
Time: 05:19 PM EDT
I believe this is a female golden orb weaver, with the male sat close by.
Except she’s red?
I read this could be due to a fungus.
Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  Nick mumby

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

Dear Nick,
We know this spider,
Nephila clavipes, but the common names Golden Silk Spider or Banana Spider, and it is a different species from the Golden Orbweaver, Argiope aurantia.  We know nothing of the red color being due to fungus.  This BugGuide image also depicts an individual with reddish coloration.  It might be just individual variation.  We agree that your image also depicts the diminutive male sharing the web of his much larger mate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination