Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big spider!
Location: Southeastern Virginia
June 1, 2016 6:25 pm
Found this creature in my kitchen in southeastern Virginia in May 2016. I captured him in a cup and set him free outside, away from the house. It is quite large, What type of spider is this?
Signature: Beaker

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Beaker,
This is a harmless Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are sometimes called Dock Spiders.  We are guessing you have a body of water near your home.  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

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Subject: My Company’s New Pet
Location: New Jersey
May 24, 2016 7:23 am
Hi Mr. Bugman!
So, We happened upon this little guy/girl at our office in New Jersey, just sitting there on the floor. I was able to be right next to it without it scurrying about, even let me catch it in a cup to let it out outside. Any ideas what it is? It was fairly big compared to most spiders I’m used to seeing around the house or office. I didn’t think to take a picture of it next to anything to compare its size at the time but I know with its legs it was just small enough to fit inside the cup I used. (Picture of cup attached too lol)
Signature: Stef

Male Fishing Spider

Male Fishing Spider

Dear Stef,
Based on the size of his pedipalps, we believe this Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes is a male, and that he is most likely a Northern Fishing SpiderDolomedes tenebrosus, a species generally found near water.  According to BugGuide:  “A study by Schwartz, Wagner & Hebets, August 2013, has found that during mating the male of this species dies.”

Oh wow that was fast! Thank you so much! I thought that’s what it might have been, googling around on the web, but most of the pictures I found showed the spider to be much bigger than the one we had (like the size of my palm or bigger) this guy was much smaller in that regards. Which I suppose the fact that he’s a male would explain that lol
Either way, thanks for clarifying! Now I can ease my coworker’s fears that this spider is not going to put him in the hospital haha
Stef

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large spider
Location: East Tennessee. Johnson city
April 30, 2016 2:09 pm
Just curious about what type of spider this is.
Signature: Halston Brooks

Male Nursery Web Spider

Male Nursery Web Spider

Dear Halston,
We believe this is a male Nursery Web Spider,
Pisaurina mira, a species well represented on our site, though we generally receive images of female Nursery Web Spiders.  Males have much larger pedipalps, the leglike appendages that are near the chelicerae or fangs.  According to the Spiders of Kentucky:  “Like the chelicerae, a spider’s pedipalps are part of its mouth, and are located just between the chelicerae and first pair of legs on the cephalothorax. Pedipalps are jointed, and look somewhat like small legs. They are not used like legs, though.  Instead, they are more like antennae: pedipalps help the spider sense objects that it encounters.  Some spiders also use their pedipalps to shape their webs and to aid in prey capture and feeding.  Pedipalps are used by male spiders to transfer sperm to female spiders.  In fact, you can usually distinguish a male spider from a female because of the male’s enlarged pedipalps.  All arachnids have pedipalps, but they often look quite different than spider pedipalps.  In Scorpions, for instance, the large pincers are actually modified pedipalps.”  Nursery Web Spiders do not spin webs to snare prey.  The female builds a nursery web to protect the young and both sexes hunt rather than to wait passively for prey.  Here is a BugGuide posting that illustrates the eye arrangement which we used to identify your individual.  Our big doubt regarding this identification was the size of the spinnerets visible in your individual.  We did locate an image of an adult male on the Spiders In Ohio site that possesses similar spinnerets (scroll to view image), the organs used in spinning silk.

Male Nursery Web Spider

Male Nursery Web Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big-ass spider
Location: Manzanillo, Costa Rica
April 21, 2016 1:46 am
So I was fortunate enough to have a visit from this gal (I’m assuming) on my mosquito net over my bed. No mosquitos getting to me tonight!!
Was taken back by the sheer size…. but how impressive!! This is in Manzanillo, Costa Rica.
BTW….. not that I’m taking chances, what kind of spider is she and is she seriously poisonous? Thanks!!!
Signature: Arachnid lover

Possibly Fishing Spider

Possibly Fishing Spider

Dear Arachnid Lover,
We often try to guess an identity prior to viewing the images, and we were certain you were inquiring about a Huntsman Spider, but the front two pairs of legs on your spider are two short for a Huntsman.  We believe your spider may be a Nursery Web Spider in the family Pisauridae, and it reminds us of a North American Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  Fishing Spiders are quite large, but perfectly harmless.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  We have not had much luck finding Costa Rican examples online.  The young lady in the image looks quite enthralled with the spider.

Possibly Fishing Spider

Possibly Fishing Spider

Thank-you very much for the information.  It too, reminds me of the spiders that come up from under the dock in the summertime!   The critters down here are a bug lovers paradise!

Some people call Fishing Spiders, by the name Dock Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of spider is this?
Location: South Mississippi
April 6, 2016 7:55 pm
Hi bugman! There seems to be a lot of debate online about what kind of spider this is. Can you help?
Signature: Very scared of spiders!

Nursery Web Spider

Nursery Web Spider

Dear Very scared of spiders!,
This is a harmless Nursery Web Spider, Pisaurina mira, and it appears to have met an unnatural end, prompting us to tag this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison, and we believe most people would agree that the living spider is much more attractive than the dead individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider identification.
Location: Burriville, RI
January 10, 2016 5:34 pm
Dear Bugman,
I am curious if you can identify this particular spider. Usually the biggest spider we get around here are wolf spiders but this one is larger and has a different coloration. This was taken in the spring and I found it under my car while washing it. I was able to get close so that tells me it doesn’t scare easy.
Signature: John

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear John,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and we believe it is most likely Dolomedes tenebrosus which you can verify by comparing your individual to this BugGuide image.  Fishing Spiders are quite large and most species are found not far from fresh water.

Wow thank you very much! That makes a lot of sense, because I live pretty close to the town reservoir. I see now you’ve addressed this spider a few times before, my apologies my phone didn’t load the site properly at the time. Again thank you for your time.

There is no need to apologize.  We like being able to post new content to our site daily.  We also like having multiple examples of the same species as that helps in future identifications as well as acting as a species range indication.  Your posting did get 11 likes from our readers in just three days.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination