Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cool website….and here’s one for you.
Hi there bugman,
We went camping this weekend and found this lovely specimen in Emilie’s tent. (She was not too happy about it.) From your site, the closest shot I can find is the Dolomedes Fishing Spider. Could that be it? What do you think? It wasn’t super fast and had red striping on the legs…..well, you can see for yourselves. Thanks for any info you might have. We were at a campground in the woods near a lake in S. Missouri.
Anne

Hi Anne,
You are correct. This is a Dolomedes Fishing Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

LARGE HUNTING SPIDER: Say Hello to my Little Friend
This girl showed upon my kitchen wall yesterday afternoon, here in Mooresville, NC. She gave me quite a fright. I am 99.9% sure she is a Dark Dolomedes or Dolomedes tenebrosus. I literally hyperventilated removing her from the wall. But by this afternoon when we released her she had grown on me. I hope she will be ok by the termite and beetle filled log we released her onto. Most of the info I have found on them, have them much nearer a water source than we are, as well as farther north.Thanks for your time,
Michelle

Hi Michelle,
This is most definitely a Dolomedes Fishing Spider. Glad to hear it was relocated outdoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

images for your site
Greetings from North East Texas,
As an amateur photographer, I have become quite interested in capturing images of little things in nature. I started with wildflowers and gravitated to insects, and such. Your site has been tremendously helpful in identifing what I have captured. Here, I can almost always find out what I have found, lol. Although no one has yet identified the “MYSTERY SPIDER” which I sent to you this past summer, I am not at all discouraged nor put off. It is after all a very unusual spider and I am aware of the huge workload the site requires. It is my hope, that by submitting these attached images, I will be able to add to your archives so others may find out what they found. Please forgive any lack of identification or misinformation my titles may include and feel free to use the images as you wish. If there is anyway I can be of assistance, please also feel free to ask. BTW – all these images were taken this year in the Northeast corner of Texas with a Nikon 7900 coolpix digital camera and usually from a working distance of a few
inches.
Lee R.

Hi Lee,
It will be impossible to post all of the images you sent in this email. Formatting 15 images and posting them to the appropriate pages will take all day, sadly, a luxury we do not have. We have selected your awesome photo of the Six Spotted Fishing Spider, Dolomedes triton, to post with your letter. If time allows, we may post others.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Nursery Web or Fishing Spider? (plus, they’re just cool pictures!)
I live in the lowcountry of South Carolina and found this spider on my back patio a couple of weeks ago. The toad is a baby one, maybe about 1″ – 1 1/4″ long. I took so many pictures, this guy (gal?) must have gotten sick of my camera’s paparazzo flashblub because he took off across the lawn, taking the toad with him. I haven’t seen him since. I understand that, assuming this is the type of spider I think it is, that the bite is not lethal or particularly dangerous, but what if they get into a house and bite a small pet? Or even a baby or toddler? Thanks so much!
Samantha

Hi Samantha,
Wow! What a wonderful photo. This is a Dolomedes Fishing Spider, and it appears to be feasting on a Tree Frog. All spiders have venom, and it is possible that a bite could affect a sensitive person in a negative way. It is a sure bet that it would cause discomfort like swelling and or itching.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Fishing spider?
Hi! I think your website is fantastic and I wanted to positively identify this spider. I found it on our house (spanning a good 4 inches) in western NC and thought it might be a fishing spider. What do you think?
Thank you,
Kelley

Hi Kelley,
You are correct. This is a Dolomedes Fishing Spider, probably Dolomedes scriptus. Eric Eaton just corrected us: ” The fishing spider posted most recently is not D. scriptus, but Dolomedes tenebrosus in all likelihood. D. tenebrosus is usually found away from water, not so most of the others in the genus.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wolf Spider?
Hello Bugman,
Took a photo of this lovely spider last summer but it got lost in the reams of electronic image files until recently. Can you confirm that this is a wolf spider? Neighbor swears it is.
Kind Regards,
James

Hi James,
Your neighbor is wrong. This is a Dolomedes Fishing Spider. They are large spiders capable of diving beneath the surface of the water where they can catch small fish. They are almost always found close to water and various species range from Canada to the Southern states.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination