Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
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spider eating a dragon fly.
I have no idea what this is….I think it could be a fishing spider, There was no web present in the area (a shed in Milo Maine). It caught the dragon fly without leaving the spot I took the picture.
Robert A. Prescott

Hi Robert,
Your photo does not provide an angle for easy identification, but it sure is a dramatic image. We believe, based on size and description, that this is a Fishing Spider that has made fast food of a Dragonfly.

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Fishing Spiders…nowhere near fish or water?
Hello Lisa and Daniel,
I’ll start by saying that you run a wonderful site, because although I know you get a lot of complimentory emails, you deserve many, many more. I’ve always loved bugs, mostly because my dad loved them, and I remember whole afternoons spent hunting for them with him, with the wonders and discoveries that I thought only a child could experience when seeing some strange multi-legged thing for the first time. Your site has proved me wrong, however, as I find myself browsing your images and explanations for whole afternoons…and loving every minute of it. What a wealth of information! I’m here every time I find a bug I’ve never seen, and then I stay even after identifying it because I know there are many more I haven’t seen in here. So first, KUDOS!
Now second. I’ve attached two pictures of what I believe to be ‘fishing spiders’, or at least spiders of the Dolomedes genus. We get these every year, and when I say these, I mean spiders galore, in the basement. And they are BIG! They don’t really bother me, I think they’re pretty cool actually, but I’m wondering about one thing: I live in Québec, Canada, and nowhere near water. I’m in the city and although there are woods behind the house, there is no pond, or stagnant water pool, or anything. Yet every year, they ‘appear’, full grown – I’ve never even seen spiderlings. One day there’s nothing, and the next, they’re everywhere. They don’t travel upstairs, but I find them more often than not in the litter box. Well camouflaged, too, I don’t see them until I scoop them up… So I guess my question is: are they really fishing spiders? Or are they something else? And if they are, what are they eating in my basement? And how do they get there?? The ones in the pictures are about the size of a credit card, but we’ve gotten bigger ones. I tend to release them in the wilderness, because although their venom might not be very strong, I have four cats and would not want spiders as part of their diet. My husband thinks they come up through the drain…Is that even possible? Anyway, I know you’re pretty busy with a lot of emails, and you might not get to answer me quickly – or at all, but I thought you might like the pictures for the site – although you have a lot of them already. In any case, thanks for all the great work, it really is appreciated!
Christine

Hello Christine,
Your kind letter just made our day. This is a Dolomedes species, the genus of spiders commonly called Fishing Spiders. Not all species, nor even all individuals are found near water. Dolomedes albineus is arboreal. The nearby woods are probably responsible for your spider population. At any rate, basements and cellars are generally damp dark places, and that is an ideal habitat for many spiders. They might be eating one another and they are probably doing a very good job of keeping your home free of other less desireable visitors. We suspect this is Dolomedes tenebrosus, which according to Wikipedia, exhibits female giganticism.

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Pisaurina Mira going for a dip
Hey Bug Man,
After yesterday’s encounter with a probable dolomedes, I spotted this little fellow in another area of the garden. It seems to be a pisaurina mira, and I think this photo shows off its distinctive markings quite well. I may have to invest in a macro lens. Cheers,
Matt

Hi Matt,
Thank you ever so much for sending in your Nursery Web Spider image. She is quite a beauty.

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Cool website….and here’s one for you.
Hi there bugman,
We went camping this weekend and found this lovely specimen in Emilie’s tent. (She was not too happy about it.) From your site, the closest shot I can find is the Dolomedes Fishing Spider. Could that be it? What do you think? It wasn’t super fast and had red striping on the legs…..well, you can see for yourselves. Thanks for any info you might have. We were at a campground in the woods near a lake in S. Missouri.
Anne

Hi Anne,
You are correct. This is a Dolomedes Fishing Spider.

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LARGE HUNTING SPIDER: Say Hello to my Little Friend
This girl showed upon my kitchen wall yesterday afternoon, here in Mooresville, NC. She gave me quite a fright. I am 99.9% sure she is a Dark Dolomedes or Dolomedes tenebrosus. I literally hyperventilated removing her from the wall. But by this afternoon when we released her she had grown on me. I hope she will be ok by the termite and beetle filled log we released her onto. Most of the info I have found on them, have them much nearer a water source than we are, as well as farther north.Thanks for your time,
Michelle

Hi Michelle,
This is most definitely a Dolomedes Fishing Spider. Glad to hear it was relocated outdoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

images for your site
Greetings from North East Texas,
As an amateur photographer, I have become quite interested in capturing images of little things in nature. I started with wildflowers and gravitated to insects, and such. Your site has been tremendously helpful in identifing what I have captured. Here, I can almost always find out what I have found, lol. Although no one has yet identified the “MYSTERY SPIDER” which I sent to you this past summer, I am not at all discouraged nor put off. It is after all a very unusual spider and I am aware of the huge workload the site requires. It is my hope, that by submitting these attached images, I will be able to add to your archives so others may find out what they found. Please forgive any lack of identification or misinformation my titles may include and feel free to use the images as you wish. If there is anyway I can be of assistance, please also feel free to ask. BTW – all these images were taken this year in the Northeast corner of Texas with a Nikon 7900 coolpix digital camera and usually from a working distance of a few
inches.
Lee R.

Hi Lee,
It will be impossible to post all of the images you sent in this email. Formatting 15 images and posting them to the appropriate pages will take all day, sadly, a luxury we do not have. We have selected your awesome photo of the Six Spotted Fishing Spider, Dolomedes triton, to post with your letter. If time allows, we may post others.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination