Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this a fishing spider?
Thu, Jun 11, 2009 at 7:24 PM
We had a pond in our front yard and have swamp land surrounding us. But this guy lives on and under our deck. About 1 foot from our back door. He can see me coming and ducks under the deck planks when i get to close. I’d estimate him to be 3 or 4 inches from toe to toe. He is very scary! At first a wolf spider was all that came to mind.
Sam
Central New Jersey

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Hi Sam,
This is a magnificent specimen of the Northern Dolomedes, Dolomedes tenebrosus, one of the Fishing Spiders. They are generally found near water and the species is capable of submerging itself both to escape predators and to capture prey which may include small fish.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Who was spying on my photo session
Mon, May 25, 2009 at 1:51 PM
I found this spider crawling on the ground next to me while taking photos of a big ol’ wolf spider. I went ahead and gathered him up to get him in on the photo shoot. He didn’t seem quite as content sitting on top of the rock as the larger wolf spider, camera shy I guess. Obviously I cant seem to figure out what it is, the guides on the net seem to be pretty lacking. The closest I can gather is this is another species of wolf spider, some characteristics look similar but not distinct enough for me to tell.
Scott
Northern Michigan, USA

Nursery Web Spider

Nursery Web Spider

Hi Scott,
Though the markings are atypical, we suspected that this was a Nursery Web Spider.  Upon looking through the images posted to BugGuide, we located an individual with nearly identical markings identified as Pisaurina mira.  The Nursery Web Spider, which is related to the Dolomedes Fishing Spiders, is a beautiful and fascinating species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Fishing Spider
Fri, Dec 19, 2008 at 8:56 PM
Hi Guys,
Got this lovely lady in my garden today. She is Dolomedes instabilis, in the Pisauridae family of fishing spiders, although many in the family never go near water but build nests amongst green leaves, as this one is doing on a chili plant. Have a merry Xmas and a Happy New Year all.
aussietrev
Queensland, Australia

Common Water Spider from Australia

Common Water Spider from Australia

Hi Trevor,
This is very exciting.  We were not aware that Dolemedes Fishing Spiders were found in Australia.  We are linking to the Brisbane Insect Web Site and another page on the same site that calls the species the Common Water Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wolf Spider?
Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 12:36 PM
Is this a kind of wolf spider? It was on the floor of an old garage and moved very quickly. It was almost the size of a compact disc with legs outreached. Body was about size of bottle cap.
JR
USA, northeast

White Banded Fishing Spider

White Banded Fishing Spider

Hi JR,
This is a Dolomedes Fishing Spider, not a Wolf Spider. Fishing Spiders are in the Nursery Web Spider group, and like Wolf Spiders, they are hunting spiders and not snare web building spiders. We believe your specimen is a White Banded Fishing Spider, Dolomedes albineus, based on an image posted to BugGuide. Your location, USA, northeast, is a bit vague. BugGuide lists sightings as far north as Delaware, but that doesn’t mean the species is unknown in New England. If this is not the White Banded Fishing Spider, it is another member of the genus Dolomedes.

Thanks Daniel, very interesting!  I am sorry about the vague location.  I
found it in Norridgewock, Maine, about 40 minutes north from Augusta and 1.5
hours north from Portland.
Thanks again, Jim

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

nursery web spider vs. funnel web spider
You recently identified a large spider carrying a big egg sack to a funnel nest as a nursery web. I think it is a funnel web…because of the striped legs…and the funnel in a tree location..somewhere around Durham NC. I believe that the nursery web spiders have a drabber appearance…but i just thought you might want to check it out. Tell me if I am wrong because I find these spiders all the time, and I’d love to know exactly what it was. Best,
mary Sonis

Followup: crittercam
This is my funnel web spider…I think…the egg sac she is carrying is the size of a shooter marble. her eggs hatched…that’s a lot of spiderlings she was near her mate in this funnel…note the striped legs on both … so what do you think it is? I’m not convinced this girl is a fishing spider By the way , I love your site! Best,
Mary Sonis

Hi Mary,
We were having some trouble making sense out of your multiple letters and referred back to the posting on our site that you cited from September 18, 2005 which is on our Spiders 5 page. Terry wrote: “Both were originally just outside the hole in a hollow tree” but he makes no mention of a web. Your letter included three of your own photos, two of the female with egg sac and hatchlings, and another photo. You wrote “she was near her mate in this funnel.” We are identifying your female spider with the egg sac and her hatchlings as a Dolomedes Fishing Spider, one of the Nursery Web Spiders. You can look at the photos posted to BugGuide and see that many have the striped legs you are using to identify Funnel Web Spiders. You can also see from the images on BugGuide, that Funnel Web Spiders in the family Agelenidae also have striped legs. They are not as big as the Dolomedes Fishing Spiders, and they spin funnel webs, unlike the hunting Dolomedes that don’t spin webs. Your mistake is in thinking that you have photos of one species when you have actually photographed two species. We are most thrilled with your photo of the female Dolomedes with her hatchlings.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for all the help with this. Ok, I have 2 species..I am curious why my Dolomedes would build her nursery web 6 inches from a funnel spider…and actually within the webbing of the funnel. I would think the funnel spider would think she had won the lottery as far as dinner is concerned! As far as I can see the funnel web has eaten none of our spiderlings…who are slowly dispersing along my back wall. i really appreciate all your effort on this…your site is just dynamite. Sincerely,
Mary Sonis

Followup: (08/14/2008)
Hi again Mary,
One more thought for you to ponder is that though many spiders are maternal and protective of their eggs and young, including Fishing Spiders, Wolf Spiders, and Lynx Spiders, we do not know of a single case where the female spider wants anything to do with her mate once she has mated, unless she wants to eat him like a Black Widow. Why the Fishing Spider would choose to deposit her spiderlings near a Funnel Web Spider is a very good question.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider in Ohio
Well we have been finding spiders in the house lately and came here to find out what they are. Turns out they are wolf spiders…. Oh joy … NOT lol I must say I am NOT a fan of spiders. More the fact I am scared to death of them. Even coming to this site was very hard to do. lol But seeing I am here I wanted to asked you about one we saw in Meigs County in Ohio. At the end of a parking lot of a motel we stayed at there is a swampy area with cat tails and the sort. I saw some bird flying around a big puddle in the parking lot. When I went to see what they were looking at, I saw a spider. It was completly underwater and moving to the edge quickly. Size wise I guess I would say with legs included around 2 inches or so. I am sending a picture of it which shows the marking pretty good …Well as good as I could get with not wanting to get to close. Yes ME taking a picture of a spider. Guess it impressed me. lol

This is a Six Spotted Fishing Spider, Dolomedes triton. These amazing spiders are associated with wetlands, and they are capable of spending periods of time underwater, either to escape predators, like birds, or to catch prey, including small fish.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination