Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  some type of wolf spider
Geographic location of the bug:  arvada,co
Date: 07/10/2018
Time: 11:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i found this at a creek in arvada.i believe it is some type of wolf spider but id lile a more detailed identification. you might notice the egg sac shes holding in her fangs, she laid it ahout a week after i found her. ive had her for around three weeks.
How you want your letter signed:  Alex

Female Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Alex,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, not a Wolf Spider.  Both Fishing Spiders and Wolf Spiders have well documented maternal behavior, and both transport an egg sac after producing it.  The Wolf Spiders drag the egg sac from the spinnerets, and when the spiderlings hatch, they crawl on the body of the female for several days before eventually dispersing.  Fishing Spiders carry the egg sac in the chelicerae or fangs as your image illustrates, and like other Nursery Web Spiders, they will eventually construct a nursery web that they guard when they find a location that is appropriate.  Dolomedes scriptus is reported from Colorado according to BugGuide, and the individual in this BugGuide image has markings very much like your Spider, so we believe that species is correct.   Fishing Spiders are often found near water, and adult Fishing Spiders are capable of capturing aquatic prey, including small fish.

Fishing Spider

thank you SO much! this was very helpful and I am very impressed in how quickly you got back to me. have a wonderful day!

Fishing Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Canonsburg pa
Date: 07/09/2018
Time: 03:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I keep finding these and others similar. They are tearing up the woods behind my home for a new complex.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Fishing Spider

This is a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, and they are not considered dangerous.  We are always sad to hear about habitat destruction in the name of progress.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  White Banded Fishing Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Montgomery, TX in forest.
Date: 07/06/2018
Time: 05:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
Just thought you might like to add this picture to the article you have about the white banded fishing spider. This thing is huge and hangs out on our back porch up on the bricks and assists with bug control. He or she is very white and I found it strange just how white it really is.
How you want your letter signed:  Casey Ellison

White-Banded Fishing Spider

Dear Casey,
Your images of a White Banded Fishing Spider,
Dolomedes albineus, are positively gorgeous.  Not all White-Banded Fishing Spiders have such a light coloration, and BugGuide indicates:  “Generally an ID can be made by the white band along the ‘face’ (clypeus).”

White-Banded Fishing Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  D. tenebrosus, male or female?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio
Date: 06/13/2018
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bug Folks!
I’ve got some wonderful photos of a Dolomedes tenebrosus (Fishing Spider) we caught last night in our Ohio basement. My housemate deals in exotics and this little friend was feasting on escaped crickets, good spider!
It’s actually bigger than some of his tarantulas. Housemate decided to keep it, at least for now.
I thought of you guys immediately, knew you’d want to see the photos (Sharpie marker for scale). I don’t know how dimorphic they are but can you tell if it’s a male or a female? I don’t want to keep calling our guest “it” and “spider,” I feel anybody living with us should have a name. The spider doesn’t care, but I do.
Thanks!
KLeigh

Fishing Spider

Dear KLeigh,
Please use our standard submission form for future submissions.  Our gut instinct is that this is a female Fishing Spider.  Many Spiders can be sexed because males have much more pronounced pedipalps that are used for mating and females are usually larger.  We will attempt to do some further research on telling male and female Fishing Spiders from one another.  Perhaps you will enjoy these images of mating Fishing Spiders from our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Rhode Island -Kingston
Date: 06/14/2018
Time: 04:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think this is a Carolina Wolf Spider or maybe a fishing spider but not sure.  She is a beauty though
How you want your letter signed:  Cynthia Holt

Fishing Spider

Dear Cynthia,
This impressive spider is one of the Fishing Spiders in the genus
Dolomedes, most likely Dolomedes tenebrosus which you can read about on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this beautiful spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cumming, GA
Date: 04/14/2018
Time: 11:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was watering the plants in my garden and saw a bizarre pattern on my apple tree.  As I got closer I couldn’t decide if it was part of the tree or if it was a really well camouflaged bug.  I had to get really close to see that it was a spider!  I have never seen anything like it.  It was perfectly blended into the bark of the tree.  What is this amazing spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in GA

Probably White Banded Fishing Spider

Dear Curious in GA,
This magnificent spider is a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, and we believe it is a White Banded Fishing Spider because of its resemblance to the individual in this image posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination