Currently viewing the category: "Nursery Web Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What spider is this carrying it’s egg sac?
Geographic location of the bug:  Robertson, Western Cape, South Africa
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 12:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
We were wondering if you could tell us what kind of spider this is carrying it’s egg sac?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Pearce

Nursery Web Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Pearce,
We can narrow this identification down to the family, but we cannot say for certain that we know the genus or species.  There are two families of Spiders where the female carries about the egg sac.  Wolf Spiders in the family Lycosidae drag the egg sac from the spinnerets while Nursery Web Spiders, including Fishing Spiders, in the family Pisauridae carry the egg sac in the chelicerae or fangs.  Your individual is a Nursery Web Spider.  According to BioDiversity Explorer:  “All pisaurids construct a round white egg case that is carried under the sternum held in the chelicerae (jaws). This causes them to assume a tiptoe stance. Just before the eggs are due to hatch, the female constructs a nursery web around the egg case. This is attached to the vegetation with a supporting web around it. The spiderlings leave the nursery after one or two moults.”  Wikimedia Commons has an image that looks very much like your individual, and it is identified as
Chiasmopes lineatus, but there are no images of that genus on BioDiversity Explorer.  The only other representative of the genus we could find is on Project Noah, but it is a much thinner and smaller male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug ?
Geographic location of the bug:  on the Hillsborough river in Tampa Florida
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 12:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was kayaking on the Hillsborough river – yesterday August 10th, at about 11am.  I saw this thing floating on the water, and then it just disappeared under the water.  About 10 seconds later it came back up to the top.  It was fairly large, about 5″ long – so it doesn’t seem to fit any of the water strider pics I’ve been able to find online.  It started “skating” towards my kayak so I used my paddle to swirl the water so it could not get to my boat.  I can’t find anything about this online.  Any ideas ?
How you want your letter signed:  With an answer – LOL

Fishing Spider

How exciting.  You had an encounter with a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, most likely a Six Spotted Fishing Spider, Dolomedes triton, the member of the genus that is most often found “walking on water.”  Fishing Spiders earned their common name because the most aquatic members of the genus are able to dive beneath the surface of the water both to escape predators and to capture prey, including small fish, tadpoles and aquatic insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pretty picture you might like
Geographic location of the bug:  Griffin Georgia
Date: 07/25/2018
Time: 08:59 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! Found a beautiful white banded fishing spider I thought you might appreciate!
How you want your letter signed:  Jennifer

White-Banded Fishing Spider

Dear Jennifer,
Thanks for sending in your image of what does appear to be a White-Banded Fishing Spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beauty and a beast
Geographic location of the bug:  Nova Scotia, Canada
Date: 07/19/2018
Time: 05:41 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman!
I was recently working on stream habitat assessments and ran into a gorgeous spider. I believe it’s a fishing spider (six-spotted?), but I’m not certain and was hoping for some confirmation. Isn’t she (maybe a he…) a beauty??
…  Here’s hoping!
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks, Van

Six Spotted Fishing Spider and Stonefly Nymphs

Hi Van,
We are going to split Beauty and The Beast apart for posting purposes.  The spider does appear to be a Six Spotted Fishing Spider, but we are not certain of the species.  The other insects on the rock appear to be Stonefly larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  some type of wolf spider
Geographic location of the bug:  arvada,co
Date: 07/10/2018
Time: 11:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i found this at a creek in arvada.i believe it is some type of wolf spider but id lile a more detailed identification. you might notice the egg sac shes holding in her fangs, she laid it ahout a week after i found her. ive had her for around three weeks.
How you want your letter signed:  Alex

Female Fishing Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Alex,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, not a Wolf Spider.  Both Fishing Spiders and Wolf Spiders have well documented maternal behavior, and both transport an egg sac after producing it.  The Wolf Spiders drag the egg sac from the spinnerets, and when the spiderlings hatch, they crawl on the body of the female for several days before eventually dispersing.  Fishing Spiders carry the egg sac in the chelicerae or fangs as your image illustrates, and like other Nursery Web Spiders, they will eventually construct a nursery web that they guard when they find a location that is appropriate.  Dolomedes scriptus is reported from Colorado according to BugGuide, and the individual in this BugGuide image has markings very much like your Spider, so we believe that species is correct.   Fishing Spiders are often found near water, and adult Fishing Spiders are capable of capturing aquatic prey, including small fish.

Fishing Spider

thank you SO much! this was very helpful and I am very impressed in how quickly you got back to me. have a wonderful day!

Fishing Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Canonsburg pa
Date: 07/09/2018
Time: 03:36 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I keep finding these and others similar. They are tearing up the woods behind my home for a new complex.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks

Fishing Spider

This is a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, and they are not considered dangerous.  We are always sad to hear about habitat destruction in the name of progress.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination