Currently viewing the category: "Jumping Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider?
Location: In kitchen
January 28, 2017 1:50 pm
What type of spider is this?
Signature: Any

Jumping Spider

Dear Any,
Since we do not know if you kitchen is in Albuquerque or Kuala Lumpur, we are not going to bother attempting to identify this harmless Jumping Spider beyond the family level Salticidae.

Sorry I am in north Texas

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs on the ceiling above the Christmas Tree
Location: BC, Canada
December 11, 2016 10:36 am
We live in the Pacific Northwest. We cut our tree down a week ago. Today we woke up to 8 of these guys all on the ceiling in close proximity to the tree. Did they come from the tree? If so what are they and what do we do abou it? Thank you
Signature: Alison

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Alison,
Though theoretically, after cutting a tree it is no longer alive, we still feel comfortable stating whenever living plants are brought indoors, be they Christmas trees, fresh fruits and vegetables, or flowers cut from the garden, chances are quite good you will transport insects, arthropods or other small creatures with the plants.  Your visitor appears to have 8 legs, and we suspect it is a harmless Jumping Spider that was probably quite content searching for prey on the living tree, though it is now quite confused to find itself in a relatively prey-free environment.

Thank you. Was very worried when there was suddenly 8 that we had a bigger problem! Thanks so much.
Alison

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big LA Jumping Spider?
Location: Venice, CA
November 2, 2016 11:36 am
Dear Bugman,
Once again, I call upon you to help me identify a little critter that has terrified my wife. This guy was big, bigger than a quarter, and its orange thorax and black and grayish stripped legs were very distinct and quite beautiful. I assume this is some type of Jumping Spider…maybe originally from Mexico, maybe a male looking for a mater? Any help identifying would be great. You’ll be happy to know that after a conversation with the spider it walked out on its own.
Signature: -Teacher Todd

Johnson's Jumper

Johnson’s Jumper

Dear Teacher Todd,
Our money is on this being Johnson’s Jumper,
Phidippus johnsoni, a species described on BugGuide as being:  “Mostly black with a red abdomen. The male’s abdomen is entirely red, whereas the female’s abdomen has a black mark down the center.”  This BugGuide image is a good match.  Because of your tolerance, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant with enlarged head?
Location: Rochester, NY
August 30, 2016 10:18 am
Hi, I was studying in my dorm room in Rochester, NY when I noticed a little bug go scurrying by. At first I just thought it was ant carrying something black, but I quickly realized it was something far weirder. I was hoping you could identify it. Thanks.
Signature: Connor

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Dear Connor,
Because we have gotten so many comments on the posting this summer, earlier in the week, we began featuring a five year old posting of an Ant Mimic Jumping Spider,
Myrmarachne formicaria, a species that was “Recently introduced from Europe” according to BugGuide where the range is listed as “Roughly Cleveland, OH to Buffalo, NY.”  BugGuide also notes:  “The first specimen records of M. formicaria from North America have all been from Ohio, USA: from Warren, Trumble County on 16 August 2001; the J.H. Barrow Field Station, Portage County on 15 September 2002; and at a residence near Peninsula, Summit County. Additional individuals have been observed by the third author in and around the J.H. Barrow Field Station and the Peninsula residence during the summers of 2003 and 2004. ”  Because of the timeliness of your submission, we have decided to make it the Bug of the Month for September 2016.  Readers who want to see a better image can use this BugGuide image for comparison.  If you have a sighting, please leave a comment with your location.  If you have your own image, you may submit it using the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  We don’t know how this introduction will affect our native ecosystem, but it is possible that this Ant Mimic Jumping Spider may begin to displace native Jumping Spiders if it is a more efficient predator or if it preys upon our native species, and for that reason we are tagging it as an Invasive Exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: TRACHELAS SPIDER?
Location: Stockton, CA
August 14, 2016 12:21 pm
Can’t find anything quite like this online.
In my house, right next to where I am immobilized with an ankle fracture.
No, I didn’t kill it.
What’s confusing:
1) White pedipalps (or are those eggs or something else?)
2) Marked banding on legs
Signature: Theresa

Jumping Spider

Jumping Spider

Dear Theresa,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but we do not know the species.  If you need an exact species name, you can try browsing through the postings on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: jumping spider of sorts?
Location: Western Washington state
August 4, 2016 11:43 pm
Found this in my backyard in western Washington state curious on what it is.
Signature: amber toro

Unknown Jumping Spider

Unknown Jumping Spider may be Bronze Jumper

Good Morning Amber,
You are correct that this is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but despite its distinctive markings, we have been unable to identify the species after scanning through all the genera on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had with a species identification.  Interestingly, as we were linking to BugGuide, we stumbled upon this image of the Bronze Jumper,
Eris militaris, on BugGuide that looks closer than any other image we found. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination