Currently viewing the category: "Huntsman Spiders and Giant Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is that spider with 6 legs ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Yemen
Date: 06/10/2018
Time: 11:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I read that all spiders has 8 legs
This one has 6 legs and it  was the biggest one i have seen .
it was very fast when moving .
How you want your letter signed:  Basim farhan

Huntsman Spider with missing legs

Dear Basim,
You are correct that Spiders have eight legs, but often accidents occur and Spiders lose one or more legs.  This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae, and we believe it might be a male
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has spread to many parts of the world because of the importation of bananas.  Huntsman Spiders seem more prone to losing legs than many other families of Spiders, or perhaps they are just better adapted to survival after losing legs.  We have examples of six-legged Huntsman Spiders in our archives, including this individual from Florida and this individual from the Philippines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Gentle Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Havasu, California side
Date: 04/05/2018
Time: 10:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Well, here we go again! We have moved to Lake Havasu, CA. Upon arrival at our new rental, we noticed a very large spider on the  lanai or screen room which encompasses the home facing the lake. We felt lucky to have this beautiful specimen. Today, this one managed to enter the home and was above my desk. We caught it up and placed it back in the original place we first saw it. We now have another that lives near the outdoor laundry area.
Not quick, somewhat docile, and they do seem to kind of curl up during the day as if resting. Am I correct in identifying this lovely inhabitant as a Huntsman of sorts?
I’d love to know and as usual, look forward to hearing of what this species is. Thanks so much!
Oh and on a side note, we sent a letter months ago about a new Spider we found that we call Aragog.  She was identified as a Southern House Spider. She is doing very well and is happy in her Critter keeper, well fed!
Thanks again! Love this site!
How you want your letter signed:  Keeper of T’s

Huntsman Spider

Dear Keeper of T’s,
We hare happy to hear that Aragog is still thriving.  Your new spider is indeed a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider, and we have seen this species referred to as a Golden Huntsman Spider in the past, but BugGuide does not include that common name for
Olios giganteus.  Interestingly, according to Spider ID:  “Olios giganteus has been primarily sighted during the month of March.”  According to Desert Museum:  “This is a hunting spider that wanders in search of insect prey, then relies on speed to catch it. During the day it hides, its flattened body perfectly designed for fitting into narrow cracks or fissures. At night it comes out to hunt. Reportedly, its bite is painful, though it is not dangerous to humans. These spiders generally settle into one place only at egg-laying time. Females produce large egg bags that they hide in and guard.”

Huntsman Spider

Wonderful! And March was our first sighting! Splendid creatures indeed! =]
Thank you for your response,
ŞĦĄŔŐŊ

Huntsman Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Painted carnage!
Geographic location of the bug:  Irrelevant
Date: 03/28/2018
Time: 07:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, Bugman! I work at a retail store in South Dakota, but much of our merchandise is made in China. I think this poor creature must have been painted into this canister at the factory in China. Can you identify, despite his ‘blue mood’? Hard to say with legs folded under, but I’d put the length of each limb at 3″+. For scale, the floor tiles are 12″x12″.
How you want your letter signed:  Josh M

Huntsman Spider painted Blue

Dear Josh,
We agree with your assessment that this Spider must have been painted at the factory.  We believe this is a male Giant Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has been introduced to many parts of the world because of banana shipments.  This would have made a good April Fool’s posting were it not for real.

Huntsman Spider painted at factory

Canister where Huntsman Spider was found.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cavite, Philippines
Date: 01/18/2018
Time: 10:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this spider dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  Perry

Huntsman Spider

Dear Perry,
This is a male Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has expanded its range greatly due to the cultivation and shipment of bananas, hence the common name Banana Spider.  Your individual is missing two of its legs.  This species of Huntsman Spider is considered harmless to humans.  The are nocturnal hunters that are tolerated indoors in many tropical countries because they feed on Cockroaches.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Peru, Rainforest Lodge around 20km northeast of Iquitos at Amazon river
Date: 01/05/2018
Time: 05:51 AM EDT
I think that spider looks like the Australian Huntsman spiders. Are these also common in south America? Or is it only to me looking similar? This one was maybe 15cm in diameter. Sorry for the blurry picture. That beauty apeared in our very basic rain forest lodge behind our pillows on the wall what we didn’t enjoy too much. A guy from the lodge came and chased the poor thing to a tiny hole in the floor, that didn’t help to much. Guess it scares stupid tourist until today 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  Klaus Reichert

Giant Crab Spider

Dear Klaus,
You are very observant.  This is indeed a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae, and the Brisbane Insect site has some nice examples from Australia.  There are some species, like
Heteropoda venatoria, that have spread to many locations on the planet thanks to commerce, especially the shipment of bananas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Avondale Heights, Melbourne Australia
Date: 12/16/2017
Time: 05:18 PM EDT
Hi
Can you identify this spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Thankyou Suzana

Huntsman Spider

Dear Suzana,
This is one of the Huntsman Spiders in the family Sparassidae.  There are some nice images of Huntsman Spiders on the Brisbane Insect site.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site at the end of December when our editorial staff is away for the holidays.

Great thanks for the speedy reply Daniel…didn’t know it was there until.my cat noticed it and went nuts. Thankfully it was up high and out of reach
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination