Currently viewing the category: "Huntsman Spiders and Giant Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider looks like Snuffleupagus!
Geographic location of the bug:  Singapore, Singapore
Date: 01/12/2019
Time: 04:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bugman. We spotted this rather large spider lounging atop a leaf in a shady area beside a path in a mangrove forest. My friend called it “Snuffleupagus” while I kept thinking “Davy Jones” from Pirates of the Caribbean. We’re hoping you can tell us the proper name of this pretty spider.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks!

Huntsman Spider

Because of the increased length of the first two pairs of legs relative to the two pairs of hind legs, we are identifying your Spider as a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae, and they eye arrangement also supports that family.  Huntsman Spiders are not considered dangerous to humans.  They are nocturnal hunters that do no build webs.  Some species even adapt to living with humans where they are tolerated because they feed on cockroaches, scorpions and other more problematic household visitors.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Huntsman Spider

Thank you so much for the identification of the spider! It looked so strange with all legs splayed forward, I had thought it was a decaying flower until I saw the rows of eyes. Very grateful for your help solving our “snuffleupagus spider” mystery!
Dr Gan Su-lin

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider found in Walmart bananas
Geographic location of the bug:  New Jersey
Date: 01/09/2019
Time: 11:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A friend found this spider in the bananas they were stocking on a local Walmart. My reverse image search says wolf spider. Facebook comment says tarantula. Can you provide some clarification please? Love the site, and your insightful and thoughtful answers.
How you want your letter signed:  Joshua

Wandering Spider

Dear Joshua,
This is definitely NOT a spider native to New Jersey, and our best guess is that it was imported with the bananas from Costa Rica or Colombia or some other tropical country where they are grown.  It is NOT a Tarantula.  This sure looks to us like a Wandering Spider in the family Ctenidae or a Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae.  Here is a FlickR image of a Wandering Spider.  Some Wandering Spiders and Huntsman Spiders are reported to be quite venomous, so the gloves were a smart decision on the part of the handler.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ?? a wolf spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa
Date: 10/08/2018
Time: 07:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found you on the website and wonder if you might help? I saw this spider in a neighbour’s garden. It was on the gate staying very quiet and not moving at all at about 11 in the morning. I grew up in Zim so have always loved all things “many legged”. I can’t figure out what type of spider this is? Do you know? It was almost a pinky-brown colour. I have attached a picture.
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks, Robyn.

Huntsman Spider

Dear Robyn,
This is NOT a Wolf Spider.  It is a Giant Crab Spider or Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your reply. Very much appreciated.
Have a great day,
Robyn.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is that spider with 6 legs ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Yemen
Date: 06/10/2018
Time: 11:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I read that all spiders has 8 legs
This one has 6 legs and it  was the biggest one i have seen .
it was very fast when moving .
How you want your letter signed:  Basim farhan

Huntsman Spider with missing legs

Dear Basim,
You are correct that Spiders have eight legs, but often accidents occur and Spiders lose one or more legs.  This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae, and we believe it might be a male
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has spread to many parts of the world because of the importation of bananas.  Huntsman Spiders seem more prone to losing legs than many other families of Spiders, or perhaps they are just better adapted to survival after losing legs.  We have examples of six-legged Huntsman Spiders in our archives, including this individual from Florida and this individual from the Philippines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Gentle Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Havasu, California side
Date: 04/05/2018
Time: 10:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Well, here we go again! We have moved to Lake Havasu, CA. Upon arrival at our new rental, we noticed a very large spider on the  lanai or screen room which encompasses the home facing the lake. We felt lucky to have this beautiful specimen. Today, this one managed to enter the home and was above my desk. We caught it up and placed it back in the original place we first saw it. We now have another that lives near the outdoor laundry area.
Not quick, somewhat docile, and they do seem to kind of curl up during the day as if resting. Am I correct in identifying this lovely inhabitant as a Huntsman of sorts?
I’d love to know and as usual, look forward to hearing of what this species is. Thanks so much!
Oh and on a side note, we sent a letter months ago about a new Spider we found that we call Aragog.  She was identified as a Southern House Spider. She is doing very well and is happy in her Critter keeper, well fed!
Thanks again! Love this site!
How you want your letter signed:  Keeper of T’s

Huntsman Spider

Dear Keeper of T’s,
We hare happy to hear that Aragog is still thriving.  Your new spider is indeed a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider, and we have seen this species referred to as a Golden Huntsman Spider in the past, but BugGuide does not include that common name for
Olios giganteus.  Interestingly, according to Spider ID:  “Olios giganteus has been primarily sighted during the month of March.”  According to Desert Museum:  “This is a hunting spider that wanders in search of insect prey, then relies on speed to catch it. During the day it hides, its flattened body perfectly designed for fitting into narrow cracks or fissures. At night it comes out to hunt. Reportedly, its bite is painful, though it is not dangerous to humans. These spiders generally settle into one place only at egg-laying time. Females produce large egg bags that they hide in and guard.”

Huntsman Spider

Wonderful! And March was our first sighting! Splendid creatures indeed! =]
Thank you for your response,
ŞĦĄŔŐŊ

Huntsman Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Painted carnage!
Geographic location of the bug:  Irrelevant
Date: 03/28/2018
Time: 07:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, Bugman! I work at a retail store in South Dakota, but much of our merchandise is made in China. I think this poor creature must have been painted into this canister at the factory in China. Can you identify, despite his ‘blue mood’? Hard to say with legs folded under, but I’d put the length of each limb at 3″+. For scale, the floor tiles are 12″x12″.
How you want your letter signed:  Josh M

Huntsman Spider painted Blue

Dear Josh,
We agree with your assessment that this Spider must have been painted at the factory.  We believe this is a male Giant Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has been introduced to many parts of the world because of banana shipments.  This would have made a good April Fool’s posting were it not for real.

Huntsman Spider painted at factory

Canister where Huntsman Spider was found.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination