Currently viewing the category: "Huntsman Spiders and Giant Crab Spiders"
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Subject: Juvenile maybe?
Location: Lupa Masa, east base of Mt.Kinabalu, Sabah
July 29, 2017 2:17 am
Hi.
I happened to find this at 10pm , 28th July 2017.
I checked a lot of images and there are similar ones when googling Borneo huntsman. Thing is, this one is about 3cm in length.
Sorry the photo isn’t great, because my camera is an ancient lumix compact.
Are we looking at a juvenile?
I’ve seen others with similar colour and shape but way bigger.
Thanks
John
Signature: In blood

Huntsman Spider or Wandering Spider?

Dear John,
We are not sure if this is a Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae or a Wandering Spider in the family Ctenidae.

Huntsman Spider or Wandering Spider?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a rain spider
Location: Nelspruit Area
July 21, 2017 4:00 am
Hi – This spider seems to be referred to as a rain spider or a huntsman – what is it actually called and what is the difference between this and a wolf spider
Signature: Richard

Huntsman Spider

Dear Richard,
From what we have learned on BioDiversity Explorer, Rain Spider is a name used in South Africa for members of the genus
Palystes.  Your individual looks like it might be Palystes castaneus which is pictured on BioDiversity Explorer, or Palystes superciliosus which is also pictured on BioDiversity Explorer where it states that it is “the most common and widespread species of the genus. It is distribution ranges from Kwazulu-Natal then westwards to Mpumalanga, North West, Limpopo, Gauteng and south through the Free State to the Eastern and Western Cape. Its favoured habitat is scrubland and savannah woodland and it is also typically found in houses.”  Huntsman Spider is a name used in many parts of the world for spiders in the family Sparassidae, also commonly called Giant Crab Spiders, and this is the family that includes the South African Rain Spiders.  So in South Africa, Rain Spider is a term used for a specific genus within the family that includes other Huntsman Spiders, meaning all Rain Spiders are Huntsman Spiders but not all Huntsman Spiders are Rain Spiders.  Wolf Spiders are in a different family.  Scientists classify creatures into families based on physical similarities.  An easy way to distinguish Huntsman Spiders from Wolf Spiders is the eye arrangement pattern.  Both Huntsman Spiders and Wolf Spiders hunt for prey rather than to hunt passively by building a web to snare prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Huntsman spider?
Location: Scottsdale, Arizona
June 17, 2017 2:16 pm
Hello,
My mom and I were at a bank drive thru in Arizona today, it’s 111° out right now, and we saw the biggest 6-legged spider that either of us had ever seen! It didn’t move much, but when it did it seemed to be very fast. The woman inside the bank said she could see it from where she was, it was that big!! In other posts, you’ve mentioned that Huntsman spiders are nocturnal, but this one was out during the middle of a hot day, albeit not in the sun. Can you tell me what kind of spider this was and if they are typically found in Arizona?
Thank you!
Signature: Tonya in AZ

Huntsman Spider

Dear Tonya,
You are correct that this is a Huntsman Spider in the genus
Olios, and though they are nocturnal hunters, this individual might have found itself far from shelter when the sun came up.  Missing legs seems to be a common occurrence among Huntsman Spiders.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dominican Republic spider
Location: Dominican Republic
May 15, 2017 3:07 pm
Hi, I was just in Puerto plata Dominican Republic and found this in our bathroom shower on the resort. It wouldnt move when I put the shower on but it’s legs were long.
Signature: Corey

Male Huntsman Spider

Dear Corey,
This is a male Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that is now found in warm climate port cities around the world, most likely because it was spread with banana shipments, giving it another common name of Banana Spider.  Huntsman Spiders do not build webs in which to snare prey, but they hunt nocturnally for cockroaches and other nocturnal prey, meaning they are frequently tolerated in homes in the tropics because of the advantage of having a patrolling Huntsman Spider eliminating unwanted guests with six or more legs.   Your individual appears to be dead.

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Subject: Big Spider
Location: North Central Florida
May 5, 2017 3:55 pm
I was at work and was unpacking a new air handler that had been sitting in a storage shed for a good 10 years. When I pulled the cardboard off the front, this spider was staring at me right in the face. My boss said it was a brown recluse but I’m not sure. I didn’t think they got that big.
Signature: Eric Villar

Huntsman Spider

Dear Eric,
This is most definitely NOT a Brown Recluse.  It is a female Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatori, an introduced species that has naturalized in Florida and Texas.  They most likely were introduced with banana shipments from Central America many years ago, so they are called Banana Spiders.  This particular species of Huntsman Spider is harmless.  They are nocturnal hunters that do not build webs and they will help keep Cockroaches under control.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to BugGuide:  “Can be swift and sometimes aggressive but not considered dangerously venomous to humans. May bite in self-defense if roughly handled; mildly painful bite (can be likened to a bee sting if spider injects venom).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination