Currently viewing the category: "Green Lynx"

aussietrev foodchain
February 19, 2010
Hi guys,
Thanks for clearing up that velvet ant gender. This Lynx spider has caught herself a pod boring bug but is having to share it with minute flies that feed on the victims of spiders. I guess they must be immune to the effects of venom or feed before it has made its way through the body of the bug.
aussietrev
Queensland. Australia

Common Lynx Spider and Freeloader Flies eat Pod Sucking Bug

Hi Trevor,
This is such an intricate Food Chain image and we are impressed with the excellent focus and detail on the individuals.  The Common Lynx Spider is well represented on the Brisbane Insect website, but the prey you have indicated, the Pod Sucking Bug, is not recognizable in your photo.  We did locate images of the Pod Sucking Bug, Riptortus serripes, on the Brisbane Insect website.  You sent us another example of Kleptoparasitism with Freeloader Flies last year, and we did extensive research at that time on the phenomenon.  These Freeloader Flies are in the family Milichiidae, and the Biology of Milichiidae page has this information:  “Another very interesting feature of Milichiidae behavior is kleptoparasitism or commensalism. Species of several genera suck at the prey of spiders or predatory insects such as Reduviidae, Asilidae, Mantidae, or Odonata. Mostly they are attracted to predators feeding on stink bugs (Pentatomidae) or squash bugs (Coreidae) (Frost 1913, Robinson & Robinson 1977, Sivinski & Stowe 1980, Landau & Gaylor 1987). In almost all cases it is only the females that are kleptoparasitic. In some cases a close association between milichiid and predator has been postulated, because it was observed that the fly “rides” on the predator for some time, staying with the one predator rather than changing between different predators (Biró 1899, Robinson & Robinson 1977).
”  Irina Brake is the expert on this fascinating family.
Interestingly, in the past two days, we have received numerous beetle corrections from a Dr. Trevor J Hawkeswood of Australia, and we lamented that we have not had any recent submissions from you.

Common Lynx Spider and Freeloader Flies feed on Pod Sucking Bug in Australia

Spider on our lavender bush
November 22, 2009
We first noticed this spider on our lavender bush sometime in the spring. It was very green. Now it is brown and is holding what looks to be a ball of yarn, but we think it’s an egg sack. Is this spider dangerous? We have 3 small children who like to play outside.
A.A.
Southern California

Green Lynx

Green Lynx

Hi A.A.,
This beauty is our favorite spider, a Green Lynx.  It is harmless, though she will act aggressively if her egg sac is threatened.  Your children are perfectly safe.

Giant lynx spider with egg-sac?!!
October 5, 2009
Hi,
I found this HUGE lynx spider at my aunts house last week. It was guarding what looked like an egg sac. The spider was about an inch long, with large mandibles, and big, hairy legs. The egg sac was about half the size of a gum ball, but shaped like a gumdrop, with a flat bottom and a domed top. The outside was golden brown, and looked like curly wool.  I thought you guys would like to see these pictures since you don’t have any showing an egg sac. I hope you enjoy these shots. Keep up the good work.
Josh Kouri

Green Lynx Spider with Egg Sac

Green Lynx Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Josh,
Thanks so much for sending in your photos of a Green Lynx Spider with its egg sac.  We actually have images buried in our archives of female Green Lynx Spiders guarding their eggs.

Green Lynx Spider guarding Egg Sac

Green Lynx Spider guarding Egg Sac

Green Lynx sharing Hummingbird feeder
September 1, 2009
I live in central Gerogia and have Green Lynxs in my garden. Recently I saw this one perched on a bird feeder. Even as the hummingbird feeds, the spider stays true to the hunt. I hope you enjoy!
SJ
Lizella, GA

Green Lynx Spider and Hummingbird at feeder

Green Lynx Spider and Hummingbird at feeder

Hi SJ,
Your letter is the third awesome Green Lynx image we are posting today.  It is our experience that Green Lynx Spiders are attracted to pink and red flowers where they wait to ambush pollinating insects.  We doubt that this Green Lynx could capture the Hummingbird, but we posted several images a few years ago of a Golden Orbweaver that had captured a Hummingbird in its web.  There is also a photo on the internet of a Golden Silk Spider that captured a Mannikin Finch in Australia.

Green Lynx Spider on Hummingbird Feeder

Totally necessary carnage (lynx spider)
September 1, 2009
Hi! I just thought you might like to see this neat lynx spider who was devastating the fly population on my garbage can. Thanks for the site…it comes in useful for me all the time!!
Andrea
San Diego

Green Lynx eats Green Bottle Flies

Green Lynx eats Green Bottle Flies

Hi Andrea,
Your subject line caught our attention and made us cringe.  We are thrilled to see that once we opened your email, you misidentified the term carnage.  Your photo of a Green Lynx Spider feeding on Green Bottle Flies belongs in Food Chain.  Unnecessary Carnage is reserved for human instigated killing of insects and other creatures.  So often, Green Lynx Spiders, our favorite spider species, feed on pollinating insects.  It is a refreshing change to see them feeding on pestiferous species.

Green Lynx Lunch
August 31, 2009
I know that this is a green lynx with a moth, but I thought the picture was a good one. Everyone I show it to says something like “ewwww, or thanks for the nightmares” so I thought I’d show it to someone who would appreciate it. 🙂
I also snapped a shot of her boyfriend who was a couple leaves away from her on the rosebush.
Kelli the spider lover
San Marcos (San Diego County) CA

Green Lynx Spider eats Hairstreak Butterfly

Green Lynx Spider eats Hairstreak Butterfly

Dear Kelli the spider lover,
The prey in your photo is actually one of the Hairstreak Butterflies and not a moth.  Green Lynx Spiders do not build a web to capture prey, but rather ambush flying insects from a tall perch, like a blossom on a rose bush.

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider