Currently viewing the category: "Green Lynx"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 07/14/2018
Time: 08:03 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
While tending to my plants, I searched for the small California Mantis that had been there several weeks, but couldn’t find it.  I did notice what appeared to be the same Green Lynx Spider I saw earlier in the month had returned.  It is really shy and as I moved in with the camera, it hid under the leaves.  It is really difficult to find it when it is hiding.  I observed it eating a small fly and I noticed a second Green Lynx nearby on another branch.  It is so fascinating that the same predators are appearing again this year.  I had several Green Lynx Spiders on my plants last summer.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
Green Lynx Spiders are frequently found on blossoms where they capture pollinating insects.  Hopefully these predators will keep your plants free from marauding insects.

Green Lynx Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Two insects from Madagascar
Geographic location of the bug:  Madagascar
Date: 03/16/2018
Time: 04:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
I had the good fortune to visit Madagascar last September.  While I was there I accumulated a wealth of pictures of the native species. I have two insects that I cannot identify and I would like to request your help.  The first is a caterpillar that I saw in Ranomafana National Park in Madagascar.  The second is an unusual yellow banded spider that does not appear to be Nephila inaurata, also from Madagascar.  I am in the process of writing a post on unusual insects from Madagascar for my website www.traveltoeat.com.  Like you, my website is a labor of love but I would be happy to cite you and link to your site as the source of the identification. I really have looked everywhere and I just cannot identify these two insects. With many thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Kurt Buzard

Subject:  Malagasy Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia madagascariensis)
Geographic location of the bug:  Madagascar
Your letter to the bugman:  Sorry for writing again so soon but I don’t know any other way to contact you. I had literally just written to you for help in identifying the Malagasy green lynx  spider when I happened upon a page of lynx  spiders. Sorry, no need to identify that one but I would still like to know what you think of the fuzzy white caterpillar. I think it’s great that you take on the task of identifying unknown insects and I will certainly link to your page on my website. Thanks again.
How you want your letter signed:  Kurt Buzard

Lynx Spider

Dear Kurt,
Thanks for writing back with your identification of
Peucetia madagascariensis.  We found images on iNaturalist and on Encyclopedia of Life to verify your identification.  We will attempt to identify your caterpillar. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider on woody plant
Location: Mt Washington, CA
August 21, 2017 5:59 pm
Dear Mr. Bug,
There is a lovely green spider living on my woody plant. My boyfriend insists that this spider is just guarding the plant from other, more nefarious bugs. It is quite a beautiful spider and has black hairs on its legs. What is it? And will this spider eat my stigmas?
Thanks!
Signature: Lady Nugs

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Lady Nugs,
Goodness gracious, Mt. Washington seems to be a fertile environment for growing woody plants.  Your boyfriend is correct.  Spiders are predatory and not phytophagous, so your plants are safe.  This is a Green Lynx Spider, and the shape of the pedipalps indicates this is a female.  We did need to brush up on our botany regarding the “stigma”, so we headed to Encyclopaedia Britannica to rediscover that “The gynoecium, or female parts of the flower, comprise the pistils, each of which consists of an ovary, with an upright extension, the style, on the top of which rests the stigma, the pollen-receptive surface.”  Your images are gorgeous, and the detail is incredible.  It is our experience that Green Lynx Spiders gravitate toward plants where they will be well camouflaged.  Your Green Lynx Spider blends in perfectly with the inforescence also visible in the image.

Green Lynx Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Two Green Lynx Spider on my Woody Plant
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 14, 2017 7:30 PM
Just as the sun was setting, I discovered two Green Lynx Spiders where there used to be one.  Do you think they will mate?
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Two Male Green Lynx Spiders

Dear Constant Gardener,
While the pedipalps are not readily visible, it appears both of your individuals are males.  If this plant provides good hunting, there might be a “survival of the fittest” scenario that plays out here with one Green Lynx getting eaten by the other, or perhaps one will just move on.  Since Green Lynx Spiders do not build webs, they tend to move around a bit, though female Green Lynx Spiders will remain in one location to raise young.  At any rate, having these Green Lynx Spiders on your plants will help to keep unwanted, plant feeding species at bay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note August 7, 2017
Recently we have been receiving requests to identify creatures on Woody Plants, so we decided to create a new tag:  What’s on my Woody Plant? to cover insects found on
Cannabis.
Our Facebook followers are clamoring for more coverage of Woody Plants.

Female Green Lynx Spider on Woody Plant

Jeff Lanterman wrote on August 4:  “Please more Woody Plant bug submissions!

Judith Barnard Smith wrote on August 5:  “wish there were a way to actually subscribe because I could become a bug addict…..”

Ed. Note August 8, 2017
And in the interest of balanced posting, there are some detractors.

Michael Steele wrote on August 8:  “Stop with the ‘woody plant’ shit man. You do that every time someone sends you a pot photo. Nobody here is stupid. Just say cannabis.” and “People aren’t requesting it that way, you are posting it as it being requested that way. Get off the gas. Again, nobody is buying your story.”

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider on my other Woody Plant
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 7, 2017 9:22 pm
Dear Bugman,
You have already identified one male Green Lynx Spider on my woody plant, but now this Green Lynx Spider is on my other woody plant in a different part of the garden.  This is my first time growing woody plants, which are really nothing more than weeds with benefits, and I am surprised at how easy they are to grow.  All they need is sun and water.  I am really fascinated with the ecosystem that exists on an individual plant and I love learning about beneficial creatures in the garden like this Green Lynx Spider.  What more can you tell me about Green Lynx Spiders?
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider on Woody Plant

Dear Constant Gardener,
Your submission is perfectly timed to launch our newest tag:  What’s on my Woody Plant?  With more and more people growing legally at home, and with organic, pesticide free cultivation critical, we hope to educate the web browsing public of the importance of natural predators.  This is a female Green Lynx Spider.  She has smaller pedipalps and she is more robust physically than is the male.  She is probably much more likely to remain on a plant where there is good hunting and she may eventually lay eggs that she will guard with her life.  Green Lynx Spiders do not build webs to hunt but they do build a messy web to protect the eggs.  Green Lynx Spiders pounce on their prey from some distance and they are able to take down large prey.  They frequently perch on the tips of branches, especially those with blossoms or those that attract insects.  They have excellent eyesight and they can catch winged prey.  When he first moved to Los Angeles in the early 1980s, Daniel once watched a Green Lynx Spider leap from a rose to just nearly miss a Cabbage White that was flying about a foot away.  The spider missed but returned to its branch thanks to a silken anchor line.  We believe your “Woody Plant” is pollinated by the wind and not by insects, but if your plant is attracting phytophagous species like Hemipterans and Grasshoppers, they will likely become food for this beautiful Green Lynx Spider.  Please continue to send us images of creatures you find on your “Woody Plant”.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider on my Woody Plant
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 27, 2017 7:20 PM
Dear Bugman,
Several weeks ago, you identified a tiny Gray Bird Grasshopper for me.  I have noticed many chew marks on the plant’s leaves, and I noticed that the little guy has grown quite a bit, so I captured it and relocated it elsewhere in the garden.  At the same time I found this well camouflaged predator that I have learned is a Green Lynx Spider.  What can you tell me about this spider?  I’m presuming it will not harm my plant and I am letting it stay where I found it.
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Male Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
Because of your kindness to the young, hungry Gray Bird Grasshopper nymph, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Your Green Lynx Spider is a male as evidenced by his pronounced pedipalps and long legs.  Male Green Lynx Spiders of breeding age will wander in search of a mate, and he will most likely move on as that is his primary goal.  If you had discovered a female on your “woody plant”  and if the hunting there was to her liking, she might remain and even raise her young, all while keeping unwanted insects from feeding on the plant.  You have quite a thriving ecosystem on your “woody plant”.

Immature Gray Bird Grasshopper, shortly before relocation.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination