Currently viewing the category: "Green Lynx"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider eats Budworm
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 10/23/2019
Time: 07:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Exactly one month ago, I sent in images of a Green Lynx Spider that laid an egg sac on one of my medical marijuana plants, and this morning I noticed her eating a Budworm, and her brood has hatched.  I thought they would hatch in the spring.  What gives?
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider eats a Budworm while guarding brood.

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks for keeping our readership up to date on the mundane dramas in your garden.  Daniel has always thought that the eggs of Green Lynx Spiders would hatch in the spring.  Lower beasts are much more attuned to their environments than are most humans, and perhaps global warming is affecting the hatching cycle of Green Lynx Spiders.  According to the Orlando Sentinel:  “A green lynx spider’s egg sac is much easier to spot than the spider itself. The sac is a slightly bumpy, sand-colored container housing up to 600 bright orange eggs that will hatch within 11 to 16 days. The sac is about an inch diameter with one flat side and one rounded. After its construction is complete, the female spider surrounds the sac with a sketchy tent of randomly woven silky threads. She then protects it further by clutching it with her legs as she hangs upside down.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/23/2019
Time: 04:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest season is here and I noticed this very swollen Green Lynx Spider on the second generation descendant of a seed that came from a Woodhead bud purchased at Cornerstone Collective about three years ago.  I harvested the plant on Saturday, but on Friday I noticed the Green Lynx Spider was much thinner and she was now guarding an egg sac.  Needless to say, I did not need the buds on half of the bifurcated stem, so I tied an orange tag on the stem that reads “Spider Nursery” and I will let her live out her days guarding her eggs before I harvest the remaining buds so she will have habitat around her.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
We always enjoy your submissions, but because of your self sacrificing impulse regarding the survival of your Green Lynx Spider’s brood, we are bequeathing you with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Green Lynx Spider with Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Botswana
Date: 08/20/2019
Time: 07:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello
I found this spider in Botswana 2018. I searched in the Internet and it looks like it must be a Green Lynx Spider. But that one only exsist in America. What is your opinion?
How you want your letter signed:  Greetings, Niklas.

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Niklas,
You are correct that the North American Green Lynx Spider,
Peucetia viridans, is not native to Botswana, but the genus is represented in Africa as evidenced by this FlickR image from Madagascar and this FlickR image from Mozambique.  The large pedipalps indicate that your individual is a male. 

Update:  September 1, 2019
Thanks a lot for your reply,
So here’s some evidence that it also exists in Botswana. We found it at our previous home in Dekar close to Ghanzi, Botswana.
Greetings

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Hopper on my Cannabis?
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 8, 2019 7:51 am
Subject:  Hi Bugman,
As my Cannabis plants grow larger, I’ve noticed that many of the plants have predators on them.  In addition to the Mantid I submitted earlier this year, I am happy to report that four of my plants have mantids on them and several have Green Lynx Spiders as well.  Can you please identify the hopping insect that I have found on my plants this year.  One of the images of the Green Lynx Spiders I am sending has it eating an immature hopping insect, though it is difficult to see.  The other image is of a winged adult.
Thanks
Signature: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider eats (presumably) Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks so much for keeping our readers informed about your thriving
Cannabis ecosystem.  The adult hopping insect is a Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, and according to BugGuide:  “The biggest problem is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.  The most important biocontrols are egg-parasite wasps in the genus Gonatocerus. Spiders, assassin bugs, and praying mantis prey on the mobile forms.”  Several years ago, we received a report of Glassy-Winged Sharpshooters, Homalodisca vitripennis, on marijuana.  According to the University of California Integrated Pest Management Program site:  “The glassy-winged sharpshooter is found in many habitats, including agricultural crops, urban landscapes, native woodlands, and riparian vegetation. It feeds on hundreds of plant species across dozens of plant families. Hosts include numerous common woody plants as well as annual and perennial herbaceous plants. It is common to find this insect on acacia, avocado, eucalyptus, citrus, crepe myrtle, heavenly bamboo, grape, photinia, pittosporum, hibiscus, periwinkle, xylosma, some roses, and many others. Host preference changes throughout the year, depending on the availability and nutritional value of host plants. Some hosts are preferred for feeding while others are preferred for reproduction. Irrigation level and fertilizer additions can also impact the attractiveness of hosts for sharpshooters.”  There is no mention of Cannabis.  We presume the nymph being eaten by the Green Lynx Spider is a member of the same species.

Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter

Green Lynx Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider eating an ant?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Collins, CO
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 09:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this lovely spider on my Siberian iris this evening. I can’t tell but it looks like she’s eating an ant, maybe? I’d love to know the species of spider as I haven’t seen one like this. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Sheryl Highsmith

Western Lynx Spider eats Ant

Dear Sheryl,
The spiny legs and shape of the body reminded us of a Green Lynx Spider, and we quickly identified this Western Lynx Spider,
Oxyopes scalaris, thanks to images on BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White on Lavender
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/16/2018
Time: 03:30 PM PDT
Daniel took the weekend off from responding to the numerous queries that arrived from the public to entertain a friend and to do some gardening.  This drama of a male Green Lynx Spider feeding on a Cabbage White on the lavender was too interesting to ignore.

Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White

Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination