Currently viewing the category: "False Wolf Spiders"
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Subject:  Titiotus? Not sure exactly.
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Cruz, CA
Date: 09/09/2017
Time: 11:26 PM EDT
I’m working st a job site and these Jing are in all the woodpiles on the property, pretty sure it’s Titiotus and not a Recluse or something. I would love to know what it is because they are pretty fascinating and their grip is insanely strong. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  Nikky

False Wolf Spider

Dear Nikky,
Based on this BugGuide posting, we agree with you that this is a False Wolf Spider in the genus
Titiotus.  According to BugGuide:  “All species in the family Tengellidae and Zorocratidae were moved to Zoropsidae by Polotow, Carmichael, & Griswold, 2015.”

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Subject: Spider Zoropsis spinimana
Location: Oakland, California, USA
December 22, 2014 6:01 pm
I found this fellow (and I do believe it is a male) lurking on my living room wall in Oakland, California. At just over 2″ he’s too big to live with comfortably. So, into a capture jar, smile for a close up and then away to the garden with you.
I was able to get a few good photos and with a quick internet search had the spider ID. Seems that Zoropsis spinimana is an exotic introduction to Northern California and is native to the Mediterranean. Our local nature authority, the California Academy of Sciences of San Francisco, has been tracking its spread since it was first found in the San Jose area in the mid-1990’s.
It’s not aggressive, slow moving and not believed to be harmful. Likes crawlspaces, attics and houses.
I’ve written to you to help out others like myself who are curious about these critters.
Signature: JP

False Wolf Spider:  Zoropsis spinimana

False Wolf Spider: Zoropsis spinimana

Dear JP,
Thanks so much for your well researched submission and the helpful information you have provided for our readership.  As you have indicated, BugGuide states:  “Native to the Mediterranean coastal countries and northern Africa” and BugGuide also reports:  “This is the only species in the family found in BugGuide’s range.”  According to the UC Davis website:  “In the mid-1990s,
Zoropsis spinimana, a large spider from the Mediterranean region, started showing up in homes around the San Francisco Bay area. It has since become well established around the southern, eastern, and northern portions of the Bay and has become a permanent member of the California spider population. Although the known distribution is not very extensive, this spider does inhabit a part of the state that is densely populated by humans and Zoropsis is routinely found in homes, causing concern among the people who encounter it. However, it is harmless to people. This Pest Note was prepared to provide information regarding this non-native resident.  The first California reports of Zoropsis spinimana were from the Sunnyvale area in Santa Clara County in 1992. Since then the spider has mostly spread north and east around the San Francisco Bay area with specimens found throughout Santa Clara, San Mateo, Alameda, Marin, and Santa Cruz Counties. Scientists at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco are tracking the spider’s spread. So far, Zoropsis spinimana seems to be found only in and around human dwellings. However, it is also possible that this spider is establishing itself in natural vegetation areas.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of spider is this?
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
November 10, 2014 11:38 am
Hello Bugman. What kind of spider is this? Our guess is a type of Huntsman, but there are so many different types of Huntsman photos online, and none really match well. The purple leg segments are beautiful. There is the tip of a standard chopstick in the photo for scale: The spider is 2 to 2 1/4 inches long. Thank you.
Signature: Doug

Possibly Male Crevice Weaver Spider

Tengellid Spider

Dear Doug,
We do not think this is a Huntsman Spider.  We are not certain, but your spider resembles a male Crevice Weaver in the genus Kukulcania.  See this image from BugGuide for comparison.  At least one member of the genus is found in California.  We are going to seek assistance from Eric Eaton and Mandy Howe on your spider’s identity.

Possibly Male Crevice Weaver Spider

Tengellid Spider

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
This is something in the family Tengellidae (no common name), maybe in the genus Titiotus.
Eric

Very cool!  Thanks Daniel and please thank Eric for us.  It sure looks like a Titiotus.  It’s wonderful to learn this Genus is native to CA and bite is harmless.  Sorry, we did not get a close-up of features to identify the species.  It is now roaming around our home in places unknown.  I found other Titiotus observations close-by and around CA on iNaturalist Genus Titiotus after getting Eric’s email.  Also see you have a Tengellid post from almost exactly 1 year ago, ironically from Doug, but not me, and near where we have relatives.  Thank you too for the very fast replies.  Most ironically, my last name is Titus!  Oh the web of coincidence.  Cheers, Doug

Update from Mandy Howe
Hi Daniel,
A year has passed since you sent this, so maybe it’s not helpful anymore, sorry! (Better late than never?) We’re working on a redesign of the Spiders.us website and I had also been “absent” for quite a long time so wasn’t checking this email account.
But the spider in the image is a male in the genus Titiotus, which used to be in the family Tengellidae up until earlier this year (I think I remember seeing some other Titiotus on your site before, so you might have some that need to change families now). Everything that was in Tengellidae (and Zorocratidae, actually) is now in the family Zoropsidae. They don’t really have an official common name; but we use “wandering spider” at BugGuide. Just have to be careful that people don’t mistake it for the potentially dangerous “Brazilian wandering spiders” of South America. They look totally different, but the nicknames sound similar so people make assumptions and get freaked out sometimes.
I saw that you sent this to Eric, too; sorry if he already got back to you and this is just rehash.
Hope that helps, and that you’re doing well!
Mandy

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Subject: Spider I found in my house
Location: Poway, California
November 17, 2013 10:04 pm
I found this spider in my house and I think it might be a brown recluse. But I live in Poway, California and have heard that there aren’t any brown recluse in San Diego. So I was hoping you could shed some light on what kind of spider this is. Besides its appearance the only thing else I know about it is that it jumps a lot.
Signature: Doug

Unidentified Spider

Unidentified Spider

Dear Doug,
This is NOT a Brown Recluse.  The pattern on the cephalothorax is reversed.  In the Brown Recluse, the violin shaped marking is dark against a light background.  While we are uncertain of your spider’s actual identity, we are posting the photo and we hope to have it identified soon.  We are copying Mandy Howe who has agreed to assist us with spider identifications.

Unidentified Spider

Unidentified Spider

Thank you very much for the response Daniel. I really appreciate the info and your help on this. You are correct. This spider definitely does not have a violin shape on its back. So sorry for being one of the many who buy into the hype about brown recluses and/or brown widows. I look forward to hearing what this little guy really is.
Thanks,
Doug

Update:  Shortly after posting, we discovered this photo of a Titiotus species on BugGuide that looks identical to your spider.  It is classified as a member of the family Tengellidae.  We will wait to hear what Mandy Howe has to say before we create a new category for your spider.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination