Currently viewing the category: "Crevice Weaver Spider"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

should we be concerned?
Location: found in my pourch light of my home in myrtle beach south carolina
April 11, 2012 1:05 am
Hello i noticed movement inside the light fixture on my front porch when investigating i found this lil guy not sure if it is native to where i live which is myrtle beach SC also not sure if i should be worried of how dangerous it could be i did not have the heart to kill it so i took it for a walk across the st from my house and set it free in a tree it is about thr size of a half dollar black and gray in color inside the light fixture was also a web a bunch of little dead bugs and even what looked like the dead carcus of another spider please help me identify this spider and everything about it thanks
Signature: Eric

Crevice Weaver Spider

Dear Eric,
Despite its frightening appearance, you don’t need to be concerned.  This is a female Crevice Weaver Spider,
Kukulcania hibernalis, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”

Crevice Weaver Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dark Fishing Spiders- Very helpful in the house
June 14, 2011 4:25 am
You might be interested to know that dark fishing spiders absolutely love to hunt and eat brown recluses. I got rid of an infestation using my girl. (girl because she has probably more than 100 babies that I released.) If people knew about her kind eating the dangerous spiders, maybe fewer would be killed! She may be big and intimidating, but she sure helped with that problem before I got bit by a recluse a second time!
My wolf spider hunted them a bit too, but went after crickets more. Now those are spiders to have around the house! Especially because most pesticides don’t effect recluses!
Another thing about spiders-
Recluses like moisture and can climb through pipes. I had several come out of an unused sink drain and one came up through the toilet! Watch out so you don’t get your butt bit.
Signature: Cassie Bryan

Cassie’s Fishing Spider

Dear Cassie,
Thanks so much for your email.  We hope the advice you offer will prevent the Unnecessary Carnage of large and scary, though harmless Fishing Spiders.  We are illustrating your email posting with photos from our archives of a Fishing Spider and a Brown Recluse.

 

 

 

Male Crevice Weever from the archives

Ed. Note: June 23, 2011
Cassie just provided us with another account of raising Fishing Spiders and them feeding on Brown Recluse Spiders.  We were able to replace the Fishing Spider image from our archives with one of Cassie’s own photos.

 

 

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

recluse or wolf spiders?
Location: Las Vegas nevada
November 21, 2010 10:05 am
I seen many spiders around my home when since my family and I moved in two years ago. My husband thought they were wolf spiders and told me not to worry so I wasn’t to concerned about them.
Recently I’ve seen pictures of both the recluse and wolf spiders and now I’m confused as to what mine are.
I’m concerned for the safety of my kids since there are such a large number of them.
I try to grab my camera every time I see an interesting or scary bug. I’ve got pictures of different spiders, they might not even be the same species.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Signature: Thank You (your bug-a-phobic friend) Emm

Male Crevice Weaver Spider, not Recluse Spider?

Dear Emm,
Only one of the spider images you attached is a Recluse Spider, and since the quality of that image is different, we are surmising that perhaps you didn’t even take that photo, though your email does not indicate that.  We will attempt to identify your other spiders.

Female Crevice Weaver Spider, we believe

Update/Correction
Hi again Emm,
Now we are having second thoughts.  We believe all of your spiders Crevice Weaver spiders in the genus
Kukulcania, possibly the Southern House Spider, Kukulcania hibernalis.  The lighter colored one with the longer legs looks just like a male Southern House Spider posted to BugGuide.  The other specimens look like females that are posted to BugGuide.  We would encourage anyone reading to confirm or correct this identification.

Female Crevice Weaver Spider, we believe

Eric Eaton Concurs
Hi, Daniel:
… Well, it is definitely a species of Kukulcania, but I don’t think that species (K. hibernalis) ranges into Nevada.  Likely a different species.
Eric

Update from Emm
I took all the photo’s myself. The first photo was of a spider that was inside my home. I took that picture after putting the spider inside a plastic container, that’s why the quality looks different. the other spiders were all outside and  I took the photo’s from a distance.
I wasn’t aware that I could identify the spiders by their eye configurations. next time I’ll know where to point the camera. I read that recluse spiders don’t have fine hairs on their legs and it’s easy to see that there is hair on the legs of my spider which leaves me to believe that you correctly identified mine to be house spiders.
I know now not to do an image search to help me identify insects. the results were very misinforming
I appreciate all your help.  If you’re interested I have photo’s of other insects, most of the pictures are in good quality. the photo’s are of aphids, a June beetle, an adult and a juvenile praying mantis, a male carpenter bee and a beetle. I’m unaware of the exact species but it’s bigger than my hand. I took pictures of it from where it was when I first seen it and then took more pictures of it while it was in a container. .  if you’d like to see them let me know. I’m not a photographer but I think some of them are good shots
Thank You for all your help; Emm
p.s.  All of the bugs that I’ve captured were taken away from my house and set free. I don’t kill them.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Brown Recluse?
March 29, 2010
We found this spider in Cleveland, Texas this past February while cleaning out a neglected bookshelf. It was between the books in a rather disorderly looking web. The house it was found in is in a wooded area. We’ve been keeping it in a container with wound wire for observation since, and it has established an intricate, cob-webby web between the wires and is living on a steady diet of mosquito hawks and silverfish. We’ve done a lot of image searching for an identity, but the closest we can find is that it’s a brown recluse. However, it lacks a distinct violin marking (although a dark line similar to the violin neck runs down the cephalothorax), the pedipalps are much more defined and less tufty, and the legs seem to be less spindly. We haven’t been able to get a coun t on the eyes, as they’re a bit hard to see. We’ve noticed some small indentions in pairs on the dorsal side of the abdomen, no idea what those are. If its behavior is of any help, we’ve noticed that it cuts its finished prey from its web to let it fall (although perhaps that’s common in spiders). Any help would be much appreciated! Also, if you happen to know, we’d love to know what those indentions are (pictured in photo 3)! Thanks very much.
Laura and Michael
Cleveland, Texas

Crevice Weaver Spider

Dear Laura and Michael,
You may rest assured that this is not a Brown Recluse.  It is a Crevice Weaver Spider in the genus Kukulcania, and it is well represented on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “These spiders create a tube-like retreat in cracks.   This spider varies greatly in color from light brown to dark black. Females are generally grey to black while the males are tan. Males look very similar to the Recluse spiders, except they have much longer pedipalps, eight eyes (not six as in the Recluse family), and very long front legs.
”  It is our opinion that your specimen is a female.

Crevice Weaver Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Trapdoor Spider with Young?
January 31, 2010
Tearing down a shed in South Goergia I found her with hatchlings. I laid a quarter down next to her for scale. She looked a lot more impressive with he legs stetched out, but still a cool speciman.
Wild Man
South Georgia

Southern House Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Wild Man,
This looks to us like a Southern House Spider, Kukulcania hibernalis, one of the Crevice Weaver Spiders.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds ‘messy’ webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.
Your photo nicely illustrates the maternal care many spiders exhibit toward their spiderlings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big spider on my door
October 15, 2009
We came home and we went “Eaahh!” There was a huge (2″?) spider on our front door. After some fiddling with our camera we managed to get a couple of half-decent photos of it. We thought it might be the California Trapdoor Spider that some others have met recently, but it’s body isn’t shiny and black and doesn’t quite look the same.
The Gandolfo Family
Hills outside Santa Rosa, Northern California

Crevice Weaver Spider

Crevice Weaver Spider

Dear Gandolfo Family
As much as we would have loved this to be a female California Trapdoor Spider, we believe it is a female Crevice Weaver Spider in the genus Kukulcania.  We found some closely matching images on BugGuide.  One of the postings on BugGuide indicates that individuals in this genus may live for 10 years.  Males are sometimes mistaken for Brown Recluse Spiders.  BugGuide has additional information.  We also are providing a link to images of the female California Trapdoor Spider, though they rarely leave their burrows.

Crevice Weaver Spider

Crevice Weaver Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination