Currently viewing the category: "Crab Spiders"
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Bright yellow spider
May 23, 2010
I found this spider on top of my trash can. Never seen one like this before, very bright yellow. Can you identify? For some reason he intrigued me a lot.
Thank you for your time!!
Seattle, WA

Crab Spider

This is a Crab Spider.  They are frequently found on blossoms waiting for prey, and the coloration acts as camouflage on brightly colored flowers.

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Sunday Morning Spider
April 25, 2010
Found this little one waiting at my desk this morning. It was sitting on top of the scrap of paper that acts as my things to do list, so I happily put off cleaning my desk and checking my e-mail so we could take some spider glamor shots.
I also found what might be an easier way of searching the site. Rather than going through all the blog postings, you can type the following query into google:
site:www.whatsthatbug.com spider
Replace spider with whatever insect you like, and all the lovely photos on the site with that name appear.
I guess it wasn’t that helpful though, as I still couldn’t identify this one. Oh well, maybe you can help. Thanks!
Pete
Portland, OR

Running Crab Spider

Hi Pete,
Our quick web search did not provide a match, so we are posting your unidentified spider in the hope that someone will be able to assist in the identification.  It reminds us a bit of a Lynx Spider, but not enough to provide a match.  Those pedipalps indicate it is probably a male spider, and that supports is diminutive size of less than the diameter of a penny.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spider from Guizhou, China
February 24, 2010
Hi there,
This is a spider that lives on my wifes farm in Guizhou, China (northern, near Chongqing). They are everywhere. They are quite thin (flat) and manage to squeeze behind almost anything that does not move often.
Any suggestions?
Thanks
Kerry
Anchang, Guizhou, China

Flattie from China

Hi Kerry,
This is a member of the family Selenopidae, which BugGuide refers to as the Flatties, a name that is quite appropriate considering your confirming description.  According to the Biodiversity Explorer website, they are also called Wall Crab Spiders, and they are harmless.  We don’t think we will be able to provide you with a species identification.

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A tiny green Australian spider
February 19, 2010
Hi again,
I quite like this small ‘two-headed green frog spider’ I found inside our house. Would you be able to identify it?
Best,
Ridou
Ridou Ridou
Sydney Australia

Crab Spider

Hi again Ridou,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and there are several species pictured on the Brisbane Insect Website.  We are uncertain as to what species you have submitted, and part of our confusion arises from the variability of many species.  One North American species known as the Goldenrod Crab Spider, Misumena vatia, is known to be able to change its coloration based on the color of the flower or plant upon which it prowls for prey.  You can see some of these variations on BugGuide.  Crab Spiders are easily identified because the two pairs of front legs are considerably longer than the two pairs of hind legs.  We found many nice images of Crab Spiders on the Save Our Waterways website, and there is where we believe we matched your spider to Sidymella rubrosignata.  An image on Wikipedia supports that identification.

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Spider
February 18, 2010
Hello,
I spotted this spider lurking on my bedroom ceiling this evening. My first thought of course was “Is it the dreaded recluse?” So I got on to comparing it to pictures on the internet. Since it was up on the ceiling it was hard to get a good look at it in detail without putting my face under it. Using my camera’s zoom function I managed to take a whole bunch of really blurry pictures, finally getting 2 decent ones before I ran down the batteries 🙂
For size reference the extents of its legs would poke just a bit beyond the edges of a half-dollar coin.
I read on wikipedia that recluses don’t have patterns on their abdomen/legs so I’m thinking it’s not one of those. Also his little head-crest looks like it is light on a dark background as opposed to the dark on light that I see in the recluse pictures. I wasn’t quite close enough to count the eyes in my picture so I’m not sure how it stacks up on that feature.
I just moved a bunch of empty cardboard filing boxes that were stacked up to the ceiling near the spot where I saw it so it may have been hanging out in those and got out in the open during the disturbance.
I am in central Texas and it is mid-February. We just had some cold-warm-cold weather transition which I think woke up all the bugs and then sent them indoors looking for warmth. A week or two ago I found a scorpion moseying across my bedroom floor a couple of feet away from my bed. I was able to catch/relocate him. This guy though will have to come down off the ceiling to where I can reach him. Hopefully I’ll be able to catch him.
I’m considering sleeping in the living room tonight though… 🙂
Thanks for sharing all the cool bug pictures you get, I learn something new every time I wander by this page.
prospective couch-potato
Austin, TX

Running Crab Spider

Dear prospective couch-potato,
Your spider is a harmless Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, probably Dolomedes tenebrosus, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Correction thanks to Eric Eaton
Hi, Daniel:
The “fishing spider” from Austin, Texas, dated Feb. 18, is actually a species of “running crab spider” in the genus Philodromus, family Philodromidae.
Eric

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Chillin’ Green Spider
December 8, 2009
What is this spider that i found, chilling on my side-view mirror? He was pretty cool, just kinda sunbathing and not really caring about anything. When i put him on a leaf and put him in the grass, he immediately laid himself out and started sunbathing again.
-wes-
alamo, california

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Hi -wes-,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, but we are uncertain of the exact species.  You may find out more information on Crab Spiders and browse through many images on our site as well as on bugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination