Currently viewing the category: "Crab Spiders"
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Any idea what this bug is?
Location: Penang,Malaysia
December 5, 2010 8:22 pm
Dear bugman,
I found this bug flying the last night near my laptop.The next morning i woke up and found it on my laptop and wondering this bug might be.Thought of helping it to find food or maybe to bring it back to the nature.It should be around an inch size.Mind identifying this?
Thanks,
Peng
Signature: Pengz

Probably Crab Spider

Dear Peng,
Your photo is blurry, but the extremely long front legs relative to the rear legs indicate that this is most probably a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.

Karl Confirms and provides a species
Hi Daniel and Peng:
I think you are right Daniel, it is probably a Green Crab Spider, Oxytate (=Dieta) virens (Thomisidae), native to India and Southeast Asia. Other Oxytate species look similar, but this is apparently the only species found in peninsular Malaysia. As you said, the picture is blurry but the overall appearance, especially those yellow eyes, is quite distinctive. Regards.  Karl

Yeah dont have any camera with me just took using a 2 or 3 megapixel hp thanks for the info but the crab spider that i google out doesnt seem to look like this 1.Yea those 4 long legs in front looks like pincers to me anyway had set it back to a nearby tree i believe that there is where it belongs…

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Acting Crabby!!

Crab Spider

Acting Crabby!!
Location: Mid-Missouri
October 28, 2010 9:36 am
I found this green crab spider in a section of my yard that has a lot of insect activity. I have no doubts that this crab ended up with a nice meal. When I noticed her she was being pretty active which made it difficult to get any good images, but she did stop for a few brief moments. There was one time when I got a little too close that she made a move for me (for my camera actually), but overall, she was more than accommodating at ME being the pest.
I’m not too sure on my ID. Looking at the guide, the closest I can find is Misumessus oblongus, but there are discrepancies in all of the guide images I see. Mainly, the guide shows the head portion to be a greenish color with an opaque/white abdomen whereas mine has a more clear/opaque head with a whitish abdomen.
(The third image, while not as artistically perfect, shows a much better view of the body)
Signature: Nathanael Siders

Crab Spider

Hi Nathanael,
Thanks for submitting your beautiful images of a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.  We agree that it sure does resemble the images of
Misumessus oblongus that are on BugGuide.  Crab Spiders like many other spiders can be highly variable in coloration and markings which probably aids in the survival of the species through adaptation to different environmental conditions.

Crab Spider

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Not Miss Scarlett, Hiding in the Drapery…
Location: Coryell County, Central Texas
October 27, 2010 8:55 pm
… but perhaps Mr. Marbled Orb Weaver, hiding in the roses. I’ve been looking for the mister for two years; we see the missus often, she’s quite the show-off. Are these marbled orb weavers?
Signature: Ellen

Crab Spider

Dear Ellen,
You have two different species of spiders and we are posting your awesome images of a Crab Spider, but not the Orbweaver.  Crab Spiders look like and move like crabs, but they also wait on blossoms to pounce upon nectaring insects, so they are also called Flower Spiders.  We are having a problem identifying your species on BugGuide, but it does seem to resemble this unidentified individual from Florida posted on BugGuide.

Crab Spider

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strange yellow spider?? Southern CA
Location:  Orange County, CA
October 6, 2010 10:15 pm
Hi!
I photographed this yellow spider on my daughter’s umbrella. Thought it might have changed color to match/blend in? It was exactly the same yellow!
When I blew gently on him, the front legs, which1st appeared to be only single on each side, spread apart and there were two claw-like legs on each side. (see photo)
Very interesting.
He’s living under the eave, undisturbed.
Any help you can give identifying would be appreciated.
Signature:  Thanks, Amy

Crab Spider

Dear Amy,
Your lovely spider is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and we are quite certain it is the Whitebanded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, a common species in Southern California that is well represented on BugGuide as well as being the representative for the family in Charles Hogue’s wonderful book Insects of the Los Angeles Basin.

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Insect seen on Buford Mountain, Missouri
Location:  Buford Mountain, Missouri
September 6, 2010 8:24 pm
I captured this insect on Buford Mountain in Southern Missouri. It was very odd and I decided to shoot a picture.
Signature:  John Tehan

Whitebanded Crab Spider

Hi John,
This is not an insect.  It is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.  It appears to be a female Whitebanded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, a highly variable species that is well represented on BugGuide with photographs documenting its numerous color variations.  Crab Spiders often wait on flowers to ambush pollinating insects that alight without noticing the well camouflaged spiders.

Thank you so much!
This was truly an amazing looking spider. I am glad to know what it really is.
It does look like a crab.
Thanks again.
John

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Large Spider in vehicle
June 13, 2010
This was in my coffeee cup in the m oning in my Ford Ranger, apparently crawled in through the window.
Jon Carlson
Yucca Valley Calif.

Giant Crab Spider

Dear Jon,
Are you entirely sure you didn’t pick up this Giant Crab Spider at Mickey D’s as some unordered protein with your morning coffee?  This Giant Crab Spider is probably in the genus Olios, and you can compare your image to photos posted to BugGuide.  Giant Crab Spiders are harmless hunting spiders with nocturnal rambling habits.

Giant Crab Spider

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