Currently viewing the category: "Crab Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bridgewater, Adelaide Hills.
Date: 12/08/2017
Time: 09:02 PM EDT
One single spider living in my timber insect hotel. Bright green and yellow. No foliage. No camouflage.  Never seen one like it before.  Hoping you can educate me?
How you want your letter signed:  Colleen

Red Spotted Cetratus

Dear Colleen,
The longer length on the two front pair of legs is a good indication that this is probably a Green Huntsman Spider which is pictured on both the Australian Museum site and Oz Animals.  Your spider does look different though, so we are requesting some additional information.  What is a “timber insect hotel”? because it implies this Spider is being kept in captivity.  Huntsman Spiders do not build webs.  We would also like to know the approximate size of your spider.  Crab Spiders in the family Thomisidae also have two pairs of front legs that are longer, and they are generally smaller than Huntsman Spiders, so that is also a strong possibility.  Crab Spiders do not build webs, but there are no individuals pictured on the Brisbane Insect site that resemble your individual.  The abdomen on your individual is also shaped quite differently than that of most Crab Spiders.

Thank you for your response. I will give you more details later.
In the meantime, rest assured I keep NOTHING in captivity.
Insect hotels are difficult to explain, so if you Google “insect hotel” all will be revealed.
Thanks again. Such an interesting creature.
I’ll get back to you.
Colleen.

Update:  Red Spotted Cetratus
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash who runs the Brazilian site Insetologia, we have a link to the site Arachne.org and the Red Spotted Cetratus where it states:  “A green crab spider with orange to red spots found Australia wide in moist habitats. The spots cluster at the rear of the cigar shaped, wrinkled abdomen. The whole spider can be plain green or even brownish. The first two pairs of legs are much more robust and longer than the others. The cephalothorax is relatively wide and slighly domed with orange on the eye region. The eyes are circled with white. Well camouflaged on green leaves where it seeks prey by ambush.”   There are also nice images on BowerBird.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Small pink beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Nairobi kenya
Date: 11/03/2017
Time: 06:14 AM EDT
At first we thought this was a spider but only 6 legs are visible. It blends in well with our purple and pink flowers. Have you ever seen a pink beetle before? Thanks so much!
How you want your letter signed:  Denise

Crab Spider

Dear Denise,
This is not a beetle.  It is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae.  Crab Spiders do not build webs.  Crab Spiders are sometimes called Flower Spiders because they are frequently found on blossoms where they wait for prey.  Like the pink individual in your images, Crab Spiders are often brightly colored to blend in with the colors of the blossoms, effectively camouflaging them while they wait to ambush prey that visits the flowers.  We believe your individual is in the genus
Thomisus.  According to Biodiversity Explorer:  “Thomisus is able to undergo white to yellow or pink colour changes depending on the flower they are sitting on. This colour change facilitates camouflage on flower ambush sites and is completed within 2 days. While colour patterns are species specific, colours can vary. Not all species have this colour changing ability as some species occur on bark or among grass seeds and thus are a cryptic brown. The first and second pairs of legs are noticeably longer and thicker than the last 2 pairs and are used for prey capture. The abdomen is triangular in shape, being widest posteriorly. The lateral eyes are situated on tubercles.”  Your images are awesome.

Crab Spider

Thank you for your amazingly fast reply!
What an amazing spider!  We are so happy to know those interesting facts about the Crab Spider, especially that is has color changing capacities.  Incredible!
Thanks so much,
Denise

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little green spider
Location: New Braunfels, TX
April 27, 2017 12:11 pm
Please let us know what kind of spider this is. We live in New Braunfels, TX.
Signature: Thank you, Roxann

Green Crab Spider

Dear Roxann,
We believe we have identified this green Crab Spider as
Misumessus oblongus, not because of the Insect Identification for the Casual Observer site which does not allow use or duplication of their content without permission, but because of this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Superb spider on my milk weed
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 16, 2016 2:21 PM
Hi Daniel,
I can’t believe how long it has been since we spoke.  …
I think you are going to like my yellow and black spider on the bright milkweed.
See you soon.
Hug,
Monique

Whitebanded Crab Spider

Whitebanded Crab Spider

Dear Monique,
This beautiful Crab Spider looks like one of many color variations possible for a female Whitebanded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, which we identified thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “The identifying characteristic, according to Florida’s Fabulous Spiders, is a white ridge on the spider’s face below the eyes. Can be either white or yellow. Most sources say this is a response to its surroundings, but I did find one claim that color depended on whether the egg was laid on a yellow or white-flowered plant.”  Crab Spiders in the family Thomisidae do not build webs to snare prey.  They are often found perched on blossoms where they wait for prey to be attracted to the nectar, ambushing the unsuspecting pollinating insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green spider I.D?
Location: Haiti
August 13, 2016 9:29 pm
Hi, this green spider was seen at Thomassin (Haiti) in about 1000 m. of altitude.
I would love to know its name.
thx,
Signature: Philippe

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Philippe,
We hope you are as amused as we are that this spider you found at Thomassin, Haiti is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, but alas, we have not had any luck determining the species.  Crab Spider can be identified because their front two pairs of legs are considerably longer than the remaining two pairs of legs.  Your image also nicely documents the eye arrangement pattern, which can be compared to the eye pattern of the family Thomisidae on BugGuide.

Dear Daniel,
I greatly appreciate your help. Based on the information you gave me I made a couple research on it and I tink its probably a Rejanellus pallescens.
Thank you so much,
Philippe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider
Location: Hartford ky
May 13, 2016 11:11 am
Help me identify this spider
Signature: Jobeth

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Jobeth,
This is a harmless Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and we believe it most closely resembles one of the Bark Crab Spiders from the genus
Bassaniana pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination