Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hello Spikey Crab Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia Beach VA
Date: 06/16/2018
Time: 06:10 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have never seen this spider before. There are lumps of spider web all around it’s web. It looks like it has spikes and a shell.
How you want your letter signed:  Me!

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver

This is a Crablike Spiny Orbweaver, a common species, especially in the South.  Like other members of the Orbweaver family, the Crablike Spiny Orbweaver is perfectly harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  D. tenebrosus, male or female?
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio
Date: 06/13/2018
Time: 10:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bug Folks!
I’ve got some wonderful photos of a Dolomedes tenebrosus (Fishing Spider) we caught last night in our Ohio basement. My housemate deals in exotics and this little friend was feasting on escaped crickets, good spider!
It’s actually bigger than some of his tarantulas. Housemate decided to keep it, at least for now.
I thought of you guys immediately, knew you’d want to see the photos (Sharpie marker for scale). I don’t know how dimorphic they are but can you tell if it’s a male or a female? I don’t want to keep calling our guest “it” and “spider,” I feel anybody living with us should have a name. The spider doesn’t care, but I do.
Thanks!
KLeigh

Fishing Spider

Dear KLeigh,
Please use our standard submission form for future submissions.  Our gut instinct is that this is a female Fishing Spider.  Many Spiders can be sexed because males have much more pronounced pedipalps that are used for mating and females are usually larger.  We will attempt to do some further research on telling male and female Fishing Spiders from one another.  Perhaps you will enjoy these images of mating Fishing Spiders from our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange-Looking Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Tamshiyacu Tahuayo Regional Conservation Area, Loreto, Peru
Date: 06/15/2018
Time: 10:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello-
I was in Peru last month and found this unique-looking spider in my canoe. It is definitely a spider, as it used a silk dropline and had its body divided into two distinct parts (it only had 7 legs, but I suspect it originally had 8 and lost one). I am at an utter loss to what species it is. Would you please be able to help identify it? I apologize for the lack of a better-quality picture.
How you want your letter signed:  Captain Nemesis

Whip Spider

Dear Captain Nemesis,
This is quite an unusual looking Spider.  It reminds us of of the Scorpion Tailed Spider from Australia, though we do not believe your individual is in the Orbweaver family.  We are posting your image while we attempt to identify your unusual Spider.  Perhaps Cesar Crash of Insetologia will recognize it.

Update:  Thanks to Karl who submitted a comment identifying this as a Whip Spider in the genus Ariamnes, and providing a link to pBaseArachnidos de Centroamerica also has a matching image.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Rhode Island -Kingston
Date: 06/14/2018
Time: 04:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think this is a Carolina Wolf Spider or maybe a fishing spider but not sure.  She is a beauty though
How you want your letter signed:  Cynthia Holt

Fishing Spider

Dear Cynthia,
This impressive spider is one of the Fishing Spiders in the genus
Dolomedes, most likely Dolomedes tenebrosus which you can read about on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Guatemalan Fellow
Geographic location of the bug:  Panajachel, Lake Atitlan, Guatemala
Your letter to the bugman:  Greetings Bugman!
In 2016 my husband and I took a vacation in the breathtakingly beautiful Central American country of Guatemala. This was during the rainy season, approximately mid May.
We stayed at a hotel in the provincial area of Panajachel, right on Lago De Atitlan. The hotel itself was spectacular, with many open areas and semi-outdoor corridors.
One day I stumbled upon this handsome fellow hanging out about 2.5 feet up a stucco wall.
Any idea what he is? I hope he’s a juvenile tarantula, but we were a good distance away from Tikal (where most tarantula’s are found in the country), and I don’t suspect there are many arboreal species of tarantula in Guatemala anyway (and I assume this would be an arboreal fellow, hanging out on a wall.)
Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  Liz

Female Southern House Spider

Dear Liz,
This looks to us like a female Southern House Spider,
Kukulcania hibernalis.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds ‘messy’ webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”  According to SpiderID:  “Kukulcania hibernalis (Southern House Spider) has been sighted in the following countries: Argentina, United States.  Kukulcania hibernalis has also been sighted in the following states: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, New Mexico, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia.”  Spiders tend to ignore international borders, so we suspect if they are found in the U.S. and Argentina, they are likely occurring in some countries between them as well.  We would not discount that this might be a related species in the genus.  According to Encyclopedia of Life:  “The synanthropic Southern House Spider (Kukulcania hibernalis) is found in the southeastern United States (Bradley 2013), but is also widespread in South America (Brescovit and Santos 2013).”

Hi Daniel,
Very good! Thank you so much for solving this two-year-long mystery. 🙂
Liz

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is that spider with 6 legs ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Yemen
Date: 06/10/2018
Time: 11:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I read that all spiders has 8 legs
This one has 6 legs and it  was the biggest one i have seen .
it was very fast when moving .
How you want your letter signed:  Basim farhan

Huntsman Spider with missing legs

Dear Basim,
You are correct that Spiders have eight legs, but often accidents occur and Spiders lose one or more legs.  This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae, and we believe it might be a male
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has spread to many parts of the world because of the importation of bananas.  Huntsman Spiders seem more prone to losing legs than many other families of Spiders, or perhaps they are just better adapted to survival after losing legs.  We have examples of six-legged Huntsman Spiders in our archives, including this individual from Florida and this individual from the Philippines.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination