Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tarantula
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern utah, desert area
Date: 10/20/2017
Time: 06:36 PM EDT
My dad came across this spider at the mine where he works. It was on a piece of machinery.
How you want your letter signed:  Up to you

Tarantula

This is indeed a Tarantula.  The only species reported from Utah on BugGuide is Aphonopelma iodius.

Tarantula

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Argiope egg cases, black widow?
Geographic location of the bug:  Memphis, TN
Date: 10/19/2017
Time: 01:25 PM EDT
The argiope I sent a photo of in March disappeared (died/was eaten?) a week or two ago. I thought you might want to see the egg cases she left for next spring.
I also include a photo of what I believe is a black widow. (I couldn’t get a shot of the side with the red on it.)
How you want your letter signed:  Laurel

Egg Sacs of a Golden Orbweaver

Dear Laurel,
We did receive an image of a Golden Orbweaver from you in August.  Thanks for sending images of her egg sacs.  Orbweavers are short-lived spiders, living only a single season.  Your other spider does appear to be a Widow. 

Sorry about the date mix-up. I first saw the spider in March.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Not a black widow, or is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Apartment in eastern Massachusetts
Date: 10/17/2017
Time: 07:04 PM EDT
I found this odd looking spider in my apartment. My first thought was black widow, given its shape and the pattern on its back, but the coloration is different. What is this spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Joe

Possibly Brown Widow Spider

Dear Joe,
Though your image is quite blurry, we concur that this does look like a Widow in the genus
Latrodectus, and we believe it might be a highly variable Brown Widow, a species recently introduced from Africa.  According to BugGuide data, it has been reported from nearby Maryland, and in Southern California in recent years it has nearly supplanted the native Black Widow.   While we entertain that possibility, we think this is more likely a harmless member of the Cobweb Spider family, like possibly Steatoda triangulosa which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Arizona, USA
Date: 10/14/2017
Time: 03:46 PM EDT
Please identify this spider for me  I’ve moved into the mountains from the desert and finding a while new world of insects
How you want your letter signed:  John Anderson

Orbweaver

Dear John,
This is a harmless Orbweaver in the family Araneidae, and based on images posted to BugGuide and Spiders.Us where it states:  “Habitat:  Web is often constructed on buildings and other man-made structures, especially near outdoor lights. You can also find this orbweaver in shrubs and open woodland areas, though they are not common among tall grasses.  Web:  Large, vertical, orb-shaped web is usually built at least a few feet off the ground amid shrubs, trees, fences, buildings, etc; they are opportunistic and will use whatever ‘framework’ they can. Moulder (1992) notes that the web can be as much as six to eight feet off the ground. The diameter of the web is about 2 feet or less; it has about 27 radii and 63 spiral threads, as reported by Kaston (1977). Web may be attached to buildings or fences in urban and suburban areas. The spider occupies the hub (center) of the web, hanging head down, during the night; it usually hides during the day, though in the summer or fall when they are full-grown, they may spend some daylight hours in the web, as well. Like many orbweavers, this species takes down its web each morning by eating it, thus recycling the proteins within it and using them to re-build a fresh web for the night.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Minnesota spider with “v” markings?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hennepin County, Minnesota
Date: 10/10/2017
Time: 05:37 PM EDT
I found this spider on a building next to the Mississippi River in early October. I thought identifying it would be easy because of the clear “v” markings on the abdomen and thorax and large pedipalps, but I can’t find it anywhere! It ran away before I could get a picture of its eye arrangement, but I estimate it was about 1.5-1.75 inches long (including legs).
How you want your letter signed:  Eli

Male Orbweaver

Dear Eli,
This looks to us like a male Orbweaver, probably in the genus
Araneus.  It looks similar to the male Barn Spider posted to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  East Texas Arachnid
Geographic location of the bug:  East Texas
Date: 10/10/2017
Time: 11:29 AM EDT
Greetings! Long-time reader and fellow entomomaniac here. I have a friend who found this fellow around her home in East Texas in September. I’ll admit that my arachnid knowledge is lacking; my best guess was that it was a juvenile tarantula that had recently molted, but that’s as far as I’ve gotten. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated!
How you want your letter signed:  Dani Gardner

Trapdoor Spider

Dear Dani,
This is not a Tarantula, but it is a Trapdoor Spider that is classified along with Tarantulas as a primitive spider in the infraorder Mygalomorphae. We will attempt to provide you with a species identification.

Daniel,
Sounds good! Thank you very much for your help!
Dani

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination