Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Niagara Falls, Ontario
Date: 09/25/2017
Time: 12:06 PM EDT
What is this wasp dragging a spider across the deck? The iridescent blue wings and striped body, rusty colored legs and eyes are beautiful. It was very fast but I was able to get a very short video of it.
How you want your letter signed:  Dawn

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Dawn,
This is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and female members of the family hunt and paralyze Spider to feed to the developing brood.  Your species,
Tachypompilus ferrugineus, does not have a species specific common name.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults are often found taking nectar from flowers (Daucus, Pastinaca, and Eryngium). Females provision nests mainly with Lycosids” meaning the Spider in your image is most likely a Wolf Spider.

Spider Wasp and Prey

Spider Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Why is this spider pink?
Geographic location of the bug:  Loveland, Colorado
Date: 09/23/2017
Time: 11:33 PM EDT
I cannot find anything about why this wolf spider is pink? I found it today shoveling dirt in my yard.
I have several pictures if you’d like more.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Angelina

Wolf Spider

Dear Angelina,
We are pretty sure your Wolf Spider is a Carolina Wolf Spider,
Hogna carolinensis, a species that can be highly variable in color.  Individuals found in desert areas are frequently light or white in color like this BugGuide posting from Arizona or this BugGuide posting from Utah, and this individual posted to BugGuide from Montana is also white.  We would love to see additional images, especially a ventral view.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  NS, Canada
Date: 09/24/2017
Time: 11:52 AM EDT
The girls found this spider in the bananas at work. Wasnt sure what kind this was.
How you want your letter signed:  Makayla

Male Grass Spider

Dear Makayla,
This is a harmless male Grass Spider in the genus
Agelenopsis and it is the third example we have posted today.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Concerned about Brown Recluse
Geographic location of the bug:  New Hampshire
Date: 09/16/2017
Time: 10:05 AM EDT
Thanks for taking a look and getting back to me.
How you want your letter signed:  Brendan

Male Grass Spider

Dear Brendan,
We are sorry about the delay.  Your request has been on our back burner for over a week.  We really only have time to respond to a small fraction of the requests we receive.  Since we just posted an image of what we believe to be a male Grass Spider, we hunted through unanswered mail to locate your request as your individual is definitely a harmless male Grass Spider in the genus
Agelenopsis.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  In the Agelenopsis genus????
Geographic location of the bug:  Canada, Ontario, Ottawa
Date: 09/23/2017
Time: 07:35 AM EDT
Hello! There’s a big spider web on my porch. I’ve been watching it grow, throwing moths in there all summer. Because of how massive the web is, it’s really hard to snap a clear picture of the spider. However, one morning, I spotted a second spider wandering in and around the web. Looks exactly like the one who ones the web but it’s got a thinner body and longer legs. I’m suspecting it was a male wandering for the female. Either way, I’ve made a bit of research in my identification book but can’t find a spot on description/picture of them. Here’s a clear picture of the suspected male and a blurry picture of the suspected female!
Thanks for everything you do, I love wandering on your website!
How you want your letter signed:  Madeleine Blais

Male Grass Spider, we believe

Dear Madeleine,
Though we cannot make out the spinnerets in your image, and the spinnerets of Grass Spiders in the genus
Agelenopsis are generally quite prominent, we believe you are correct that this is a male Grass Spider from that genus. Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.   Since the female has been living in a web, that is additional evidence that this is a Grass Spider or Funnel Web Spider.  Thanks for the kind words.

Female Grass Spider, we presume.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Cordes-Sur-Ciel, Southern France
Date: 09/19/2017
Time: 01:21 AM EDT
Hi Mr Bugman,
I saw this on my patio yesterday, I’ve never seen anything like it. A friend tells me it is a Wolf spider, carrying her babies, is this correct?
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Curly

Wolf Spider with Spiderlings

Dear Curly,
Your friend is correct.  This is a female Wolf Spider with her brood of spiderlings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination