Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big ass spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Statenisland NY 10312
Date: 11/06/2019
Time: 07:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this this big a×× spider…. it jumps
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks Elizabeth

Fishing Spider

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  Though it is large and frightening, Fishing Spiders are not aggressive towards humans and the bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider eats Budworm
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 10/23/2019
Time: 07:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Exactly one month ago, I sent in images of a Green Lynx Spider that laid an egg sac on one of my medical marijuana plants, and this morning I noticed her eating a Budworm, and her brood has hatched.  I thought they would hatch in the spring.  What gives?
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider eats a Budworm while guarding brood.

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks for keeping our readership up to date on the mundane dramas in your garden.  Daniel has always thought that the eggs of Green Lynx Spiders would hatch in the spring.  Lower beasts are much more attuned to their environments than are most humans, and perhaps global warming is affecting the hatching cycle of Green Lynx Spiders.  According to the Orlando Sentinel:  “A green lynx spider’s egg sac is much easier to spot than the spider itself. The sac is a slightly bumpy, sand-colored container housing up to 600 bright orange eggs that will hatch within 11 to 16 days. The sac is about an inch diameter with one flat side and one rounded. After its construction is complete, the female spider surrounds the sac with a sketchy tent of randomly woven silky threads. She then protects it further by clutching it with her legs as she hangs upside down.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Calca, Sacred Valley Peru
Date: 10/20/2019
Time: 07:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
While at a yoga retreat in the Andes, this morning I was on my way to meditation practice and I saw this beauty  right next to my shoes. Please tell me who it is, and if they may also enjoy morning meditation and asana practice.
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Wolf Spider

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
This sure looks like a harmless Wolf Spider to us.  Wolf Spiders are hunting spiders that do not build a web to trap prey, so they are often found wandering at night in search of prey.  A very similar looking Peruvian Wolf Spider can be found on the blog Spiders in Nature, but you need to scroll down to find it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Paramours of the arachnid persuasion
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbia, South Carolina, USA
Date: 10/16/2019
Time: 11:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, Bugman! I wanted to share this photo I took of (what I’m pretty certain are) Golden Silk Orbweavers. This lovely lady and her paramour have made their rather extensive home just outside my bathroom window. Her web is about 4 or 5 feet at its widest, plus the attaching guylines. Her body is about 3″ long and her legs make her even larger. He, on the other hand, barely makes it to 2″ with his legs. Her silk is a gorgeous yellow and looks quite fine in the sun.
How you want your letter signed:  Lissa Sprenne

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

Dear Lissa,
Thanks so much for submitting your excellent images of a pair of Golden Silk Spiders,
Nephila clavipes.  Your images nicely illustrate the beautiful golden color of the web.  The female Golden Silk Spider is approximately 50 times larger than her diminutive mate.

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a spider wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Conyers GA
Date: 09/24/2019
Time: 04:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wondering what type of bug this is. It was dragging a very large spider as it went along.
How you want your letter signed:  Belinda

Spider Wasp and prey

Hi Belinda,
This is definitely a Spider Wasp.  Based on this BugGuide image, it appears to be
Entypus unifasciatus. The prey appears to be a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, and according to BugGuide:  “Females dig a burrow that ends in a terminal chamber off of the side of a mammal burrow or large crack in the ground. The serrations on the hind tibiae are used to aid the movement of soil out of the burrow entrance. The position in which the egg is laid is unknown. Larvae feed on one large spider and, as in all Pompilids that have one generation per year, overwinter as pupae.”  Most images of this Spider Wasp are with prey that are Wolf Spiders like this BugGuide image, but Fishing Spiders surely constitute “one large spider.”  Perhaps an expert in Spider Wasps will be able to provide comments regarding the prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/23/2019
Time: 04:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest season is here and I noticed this very swollen Green Lynx Spider on the second generation descendant of a seed that came from a Woodhead bud purchased at Cornerstone Collective about three years ago.  I harvested the plant on Saturday, but on Friday I noticed the Green Lynx Spider was much thinner and she was now guarding an egg sac.  Needless to say, I did not need the buds on half of the bifurcated stem, so I tied an orange tag on the stem that reads “Spider Nursery” and I will let her live out her days guarding her eggs before I harvest the remaining buds so she will have habitat around her.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
We always enjoy your submissions, but because of your self sacrificing impulse regarding the survival of your Green Lynx Spider’s brood, we are bequeathing you with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Green Lynx Spider with Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination