Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a tarantula?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sebastopol, CA
Date: 10/11/2018
Time: 02:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My husband was getting ready to ride the GranFondo bike ride in Santa Rosa last weekend and saw this huge spider by his bike shoe.  What is it and is it dangerous?
How you want your letter signed:  Spiders in Sebastopol

Tarantula

This is indeed a Tarantula.  California Tarantulas are not aggressive and they are not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ?? a wolf spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa
Date: 10/08/2018
Time: 07:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found you on the website and wonder if you might help? I saw this spider in a neighbour’s garden. It was on the gate staying very quiet and not moving at all at about 11 in the morning. I grew up in Zim so have always loved all things “many legged”. I can’t figure out what type of spider this is? Do you know? It was almost a pinky-brown colour. I have attached a picture.
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks, Robyn.

Huntsman Spider

Dear Robyn,
This is NOT a Wolf Spider.  It is a Giant Crab Spider or Huntsman Spider in the family Sparassidae.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your reply. Very much appreciated.
Have a great day,
Robyn.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large black and white spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Salt Lake City foothills, ~5200′
Date: 09/30/2018
Time: 03:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Almost stepped on this guy and he reared up to let me know not to mess with him.  Maybe 3″ across.  He held that pose the whole time I was looking at him, turning to face me.  He was on a dry trail in a scrub oak forest interspersed with grass.  I can’t anything similar online and am curious who he is.
How you want your letter signed:  Dan R

Carolina Wolf Spider

Dear Dan,
This is an awesome image of a Carolina Wolf Spider,
Hogna carolinensis, in a threat position.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  According to BugGuide:  “Orange paturons (chelicera) and black around the the ‘knees’ ventrally are characteristics of the species” which your image nicely illustrates, and “Considered to be the largest wolf spider in North America.”  Despite the threat position, Wolf Spiders are not considered dangerous to humans, and despite the common name, the Carolina Wolf Spider has a range well beyond the Carolinas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Carolina Wolf Spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Denver, Colorado
Date: 09/24/2018
Time: 12:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
This big guy has been hanging out in our well for two days now. He is about 2-3 inches in length (a little longer than a sharpie pen cap). He seems very large for a Colorado spider, largest I’ve seen in years! He’s mostly grey on top with black markings (black X on abdomen); on bottom he is black and grey banded. He’s also got some cool gold/orange fangs! Also seems like his markings have changed from picture 2 to 3. Pictures were taken day apart, second day about 10 degrees cooler. The only spider I can figure it is is a form of a wolf spider.. what do you think? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  To Sarah,

Carolina Wolf Spider

Dear Sarah,
We agree that this certainly looks like a Carolina Wolf Spider which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Orange paturons (chelicera) and black around the the ‘knees’ ventrally are characteristics of the species.(Jeff Hollenbeck)” and that is exactly what your ventral view illustrates.

Carolina Wolf Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Yellow Garden Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Bluff, Illinois
Date: 09/17/2018
Time: 09:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I work in a landscape garden and we get lots of spiders, mostly cross spiders, so I was happy to come across this beauty.  I grew up having them in my mom’s garden,  so it really did make me smile. Hopefully the pictures are worthy of sharing.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin

Banded Garden Orbweaver

Dear Karin,
Your images of a Banded Garden Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata, are beautiful.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Open areas, old fields, etc. with tall grass. Webs tend to be more hidden than those of aurantia, and the preferred habitat is said to be drier.”

Banded Garden Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White on Lavender
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/16/2018
Time: 03:30 PM PDT
Daniel took the weekend off from responding to the numerous queries that arrived from the public to entertain a friend and to do some gardening.  This drama of a male Green Lynx Spider feeding on a Cabbage White on the lavender was too interesting to ignore.

Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White

Green Lynx Spider eats Cabbage White

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination