Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification Request
Location: East Africa
January 19, 2017 7:28 pm
Hi there,
Here are a few interesting ‘bugs’ I photographed while living in Tanzania between 2008 and 2011. Hoping you can help me (finally) identify exactly what they are 🙂
Many thanks
IMG 1515b in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Banded-Legged Golden Orb Web Spider

Dear Tom,
Based on an image posted to Africa Wild, we are confident that this is a Banded-Legged Golden Orb Web Spider,
Nephila senegalensis annulata.  There are also images posted to iSpot.  In the past week, we have made six identifications for you and it is quite curious that we have yet to hear back with your appreciation of our research.

Hello Daniel,
Apologies for not replying earlier, I have been away travelling with no access to internet and so this was a wonderful surprise to find on my return!
Thank-you very much for identifying these insects. There were many others of interest during my time in East Africa, and I only wish I had my camera with me more often. However, it has served to develop my interest and so I am more observant these days with what I find around me wherever I am in the world. And knowing the correct species ameks a world of difference to conducting further research and learning more about these fascinating creatures.
I have been enjoying browsing your website and think you offer a fantastic service, so I hope you enjoy the identification process too as you help people like me.
Did you manage to identify the last individual (attached)? It too was quite spectacular! (seen in Arusha, Tanzania late 2008)
Kind regards,
Tom

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider?
Location: In kitchen
January 28, 2017 1:50 pm
What type of spider is this?
Signature: Any

Jumping Spider

Dear Any,
Since we do not know if you kitchen is in Albuquerque or Kuala Lumpur, we are not going to bother attempting to identify this harmless Jumping Spider beyond the family level Salticidae.

Sorry I am in north Texas

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in Taiwan
Location: Hsinchu County, Taiwan
January 22, 2017 6:29 am
Forgive me if this has already been asked. I live in the countryside of northern Taiwan and spend most mornings running through the hills and mountains as well as farm areas. I take photos as I go.
I have found a spider that seems to spin an x-shaped web. There are so many interesting insects I see in the mountains here that I can’t identify, but this has been the most interesting.
Thanks much for your time!
Signature: paulawanda

Orbweaver

Dear paulawanda,
This magnificent spider is an Orbweaver in the genus
Argiope.  Spiders in that genus are sometimes called Writing Spiders because of the elaborate designs, called stabilimenta, that are woven in their webs.  Many members of the genus are pictured on Wongchunxing.com where Argiope aetheroides looks like a good visual match to your individual.  Insectoid.info indicates “18 Species in Argiopinae for Taiwan listed.”

Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in the Flower Garden
Location: Menifee, California
January 12, 2017 10:15 am
We recently moved from Santa Ana, Ca. to Menifee, Ca. nearer my wife’s parents to care for them and one day my wife spotted this amazing spider in her Aunt’s flower garden. She said that the size of the one flower is about the size of a half-dollar. Haven’t seen the spider since then but will keep and eye open for them.
Signature: David Nadzam

Green Lynx Spider

Dear David,
This is a nice female Green Lynx Spider, one of our favorite species on What’s That Bug? and this is quite late in the year to see one.  Judging by her size, she is eating well, and she may be ready to lay some egg sacs that she will guard.  Green Lynx Spiders do not build webs to snare prey, but rather, they pounce on their prey, often from a great distance.  Green Lynx Spiders are frequently found on blossoms in the garden.

Thanks Daniel,
I will definitely go looking through Patti’s Aunts flower bed come the spring for more of them.  Maybe I can get some on my side of the street here to hunt through my bonsai trees.
Regards, Dave

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider in my garden
Location: Southern Colorado, USA
January 9, 2017 9:25 am
Hello!
I found this beautiful spider the summer before last and realized I still had and image of it but was not able to properly identify it. I found it mid August in southern Colorado.
Signature: Christopher Salazar

Golden Orbweaver

Dear Christopher,
Your Golden Orbweaver, Argiope aurantia, is of the genus commonly called Writing Spiders because of the stabilimentum woven into the web.

Stabilomentum of a Golden Orbweaver

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  We have never heard of a situation where Spiderlings remain together after leaving the female’s protection, and we suspect the “conga line” you witnessed was of creatures other than Spiders.  The behavior you describe is more typical of social insects like ants or immature Hemipterans.  Are you able to provide an image?

Subject: spiderlings traveling in a “conga line”
Location: Chemuyíl Pueblo, México Yucatán
January 8, 2017 10:58 am
There are many unusual bugs in the jungle here, such as spiders and scorpions that carry their babies on their backs.
I was delighted to find your site – thanks!
Can you tell me about spiderlings traveling in a “conga line”, hundreds of them? Why?
Signature: Malcolm

Tarantula Spiderling “Conga Line”

Hi again Malcolm,
Thanks for sending an image.  Our initial response to you expressed our doubt that Spiderlings would travel the way you described.  We retract our supposition.  These do indeed look like Spiders.  We will attempt to find additional internet documentation that can explain it.

Tarantula Spiderling “Conga Line”

Tina Shaddock comments on Facebook
I believe these are plausibly Brachypelma vagans spiderlings and this article holds a bit of info about what is occurring in this photo.
https://www.researchgate.net/figure/262617778_fig1_Figure-1-A-column-of-about-200-B-vagans-spiderlings-observed-on-the-road-by-the

Ed. Note:  Here is a quote from the linked article:  “The spiderlings, which have a body length of about 2-3 mm, stay in the maternal burrow for several weeks. Little is known of this gregarious stage in this species, although spiderlings have been observed moving around the entrance of the maternal burrow, in where their mother is hunting in a sit-and-wait position. They often climb over each other but avoid contact with the mother. During daytime, the spiderlings were known to remain active and visible at the entrance of the burrow for up to one hour after the female had retreated. They were able to move easily through the web covering laid by the female over the burrow entrance (Shillington & McEwen 2006). Authors hypothesized that the silk network around the burrow provides an important chemotactic cue for orientation (Minch 1978) and juveniles probably remain in contact with this network at all times. After this gregarious period, the spiderlings disperse in the form of columns of about 100 siblings walking away from the mother’s burrow (Reichling 2000, 2003; Shillington & McEwen 2006). Shi- llington & McEwen (2006) observed that during the night of May 24 th 2003, spider- lings left the maternal burrow in three lines. Then at random intervals, one individual left the column and headed in a different direction, causing successive forks in the column. The maximum observed distance of dispersal was 9 m from the maternal burrow. Dispersal is observed in several spider species, including several species of mygalomorphae, all using silk for ballooning (Coyle 1983) or orientation (Jean- son et al. 2004). Previous reports on B. vagans mention that the spiderlings walk in line like ants (Reichling 2000), but no work has recorded the use of silk during dispersal. During their gregarious and dispersal phases the spiderlings do not show any aggressive behavior toward each other, as many spiders do (Gundermann et al. 1986; Jeanson et al. 2004).”

Thank you! That description sounds entirely likely – location, environment, and behavior. And attached is a photo of an adult found outside the house. Who would have guessed? I feel happy to understand the critters here in more depth.
For what it’s worth, I’d wager the spiderlings stay in line visually. From their non-colliding dynamics, and seeing individuals lose their place in line and orient from an inch away to rejoin.
Thanks again.
Malcolm

Tarantula

Hi Malcolm,
Thanks for sending an image of what we believe to be an adult male Tarantula.  We will be featuring your posting for a spell.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination