Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy large black spider, New Mexico
Location: Rio rancho, NM
April 18, 2017 9:32 pm
I have several of these around my home and I just want to know what kind of spiders they are. I cannot find anything online and I refuse to spray. I just need to know if they are poisonous.
Signature: Rainah

Southern House Spider

Dear Rainah,
Your images were quite dark, but we used some post-production image adjustment to lighten them enough to support our suspicion that this Crevice Weavers Spider is most likely a female Southern House Spider,
Kulcania hibernalis, based on images posted to BugGuide.  This species exhibits extreme sexual dimorphism, meaning the two sexes look like different species.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”  Though BugGuide data does not indicate any New Mexico sightings, they are found in nearby Texas and as far west as California, so a New Mexico sighting is quite probable.  This might also be the closely related Kukulcania arizonica, which is pictured on BugGuide and which is reported from New Mexico.  Of the entire genus, BugGuide states:  “These spiders create a tube-like retreat in cracks. This spider varies greatly in color from light brown to dark black. Females are generally grey to black while the males are tan.”  While we suspect a bite might occur through careless handling or accidental encounters, the House Spiders are not a threat to humans and they might help control other less desirable household intruders like cockroaches and scorpions.

Southern House Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this flattie(?) really Selenops?
Location: Down Rio Chucunaque from Yaviza, Darien, Panama
April 14, 2017 6:33 am
I found this flat spider “squashed” against a small tree trunk in the Darien Gap in Panama. It seems to be the same as or related to the ones in the news a couple years ago that can glide from a treetop back to the trunk, which those articles called Selenops. The spider was 3-4 cm long with legs, and when I finally disturbed it, it scampered nimbly around the tree.
This was in dense forest
Signature: Peter H

Flattie

Dear Peter,
Selenops is a genus in the family Selenopidae, commonly called Flatties, that is also found in North America and is represented on BugGuide where it states:  “Selenops is from Greek selene (σεληνη)- ‘moon’ + ops (ωψ)- ‘eye, face’. Latreille translated it into French as ‘yeux en croissant’ which means ‘eyes in a crescent'” and though there is no diagram on BugGuide, the eyes on your individual do appear in a crescent form.  Additionally the morphology of your individual is very similar to the images posted to BugGuide.  The pedipalps on your individual lead us to believe it is a male Flattie.  Its camouflage is quite remarkable and we can’t believe you actually spotted it in a “dense forest.”  Flatties are hunting spiders that do not build webs.

Flattie

Flattie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another long-legged flat spider from Darien
Location: Darien, Panama
April 13, 2017 3:37 pm
This spider was in the same vicinity as one I posted recently (https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2017/04/13/nursery-web-spider-panama-believe/ ). This one looks like it could be the same species but it has a tiny triangular abdomen.
Signature: Peter H

Nursery Web Spider

Hi again Peter,
This does look like the same species of spider to us, and the smaller abdomen might be due to this particular individual not having fed in some time.  Including the image of the Spider’s face is a big assistance in confirming that both this individual and the previous individual are indeed Nursery Web Spiders, and probably Fishing Spiders in the genus
Dolomedes, because the eye pattern on your Spider matches the genus pattern pictured on BugGuide.

Close-up of the face of a Nursery Web Spider showing Eye Pattern

Nursery Web Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible trapdoor spider?
Location: Eastern Kentucky
April 11, 2017 2:29 pm
I was pulling up clumps of ornamental grass from a raised bed and noticed a white “sack” that came up on the roots of one clump. There was a tear on one side of the sack and I could see a large, dark, shiny spider inside. While I was trying to figure out what to do about it, I noticed tiny spiders crawling out of the sack. (The second image shows them.) I’m assuming they were her babies. I left her there with the youngsters while I finished cleaning the raised bed. When I came back, she had crawled out of the nest and was walking across the deck. I encouraged her to move where she wouldn’t be stepped on and put the clump of grass and nest beside her. I went back later, but she was nowhere to be seen. I’ve checked the images here on whatsthatbug and I think she’s a trapdoor spider.
Signature: Kentucky Gin

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Kentucky Gin,
We agree that this is a Trapdoor Spider, probably a female Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Ummidia based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Dig tunnel in ground and seal with a silk-hinged lid. They hide under this lid and make forays out when prey is sensed, presumably by vibration. Males are often found wandering in late spring, presumably looking for mates.”  Because of your gentle kindness in relocating this little lady, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider with Spiderlings

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Crab Spider? Panama
Location: Darien, Panama
April 13, 2017 6:18 am
Is this a Giant Crab Spider (Sparassidae)? I found it on rocks in an almost-dry stream bed in Darien, Panama on March 27th (dry season).
Signature: Peter H

Nursery Web Spider, we believe

Dear Peter,
This looks more like a Nursery Web Spider in the family Pisauridae to us.  We will attempt additional research.  Members of the family known as Fishing Spiders are frequently found near water.  Here is a similar looking individual from Honduras on Arachnids My Species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpion Spider Bite
Location: Pineslopes, Fourways, Gauteng, South Africa
April 12, 2017 1:55 am
Hi Bugman,
My son was bitten by a spider the other day on his elbow. We checked his room and we couldn’t find anything but were quite alarmed because we have allot of black widow and brown widow spiders in our garden.
The symptoms were not severe included fever, stomach ache, swollen bite site and headache, as well as muscle ache.
We then while cleaning found a little critter which we know to be a scorpion spider which I think gave him a nip.
I have attached pictures of bite so people can see and also spider that we caught. The site initially looked like 4 tiny mosquito bites but pain he experience was something else.
Hope this helps others.
We live in Pineslopes, Fourways, Gauteng.
Regards
Signature: Tenielle

Scorpion Spider

Dear Tenielle,
Thanks for your submission.  We have had many requests for information about the Scorpion Spider, and we have not had any luck locating any information online regarding the effects of such a bite.  While we appreciate your submission, we have to say that your evidence that the bite actually came from a Scorpion Spider is circumstantial.  We would hate to think that if the police were summoned to a robbery, that the first person they found near the sight of the robbery would be assumed to be guilty.  We are not implying that the Scorpion Spider did not bite your son, but rather that we cannot be certain if the Scorpion Spider bit your son.  The reaction you describe, including the fever and aches, sounds like the description of a Black Widow bite.  According to Web MD, though we should qualify that this is the North American Black Widow and not members of the genus from Africa:

“In most cases of a black widow spider bite, symptoms consist only of:

  • Minimal to sharp pain followed by swelling and redness at the site of the bite.
  • One or two small fang marks like tiny red spots.

In some cases, severe symptoms appear within 30 to 60 minutes. These include:

  • Muscle cramps and spasms that start near the bite and then spread and increase in severity for 6 to 12 hours.
  • Chills, fever, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Sweating.
  • Severe belly, back, or chest pain.
  • Headache.
  • Stupor, restlessness, or shock.
  • Severe high blood pressure.”

Bite, possibly from a Scorpion Spider

We are not in the habit of giving parenting advice, but you might want to seek medical attention.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination