Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spiders
Geographic location of the bug:  Sunnyside, Utah
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 11:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have been a fan of your page for many years. Whenever I seen and interesting bug I come here to investigate it. I have collected some bug photos that I just wanted to share.
How you want your letter signed:  Janice Leavitt

Orbweaver Spiderlings

Dear Janice,
Thank you for your kind words.  We really love your image of hatchling Orbweavers that have not yet dispersed.  We will do a separate posting of the Centipede you submitted.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider found on car in Asia
Geographic location of the bug:  Singapore
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 03:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I found this spider on my car today afternoon and I’ve never seen anything like this. It jumps pretty well! Pls let me know what this spider is, and is it poisonous?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, much appreciated!

Jumping Spider

This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  We did not identify the species, but we found a matching image, also from Singapore, on FlickR.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large spider on a palm trunk
Geographic location of the bug:  Macas, Ecuador (Ecuadorian Amazon)
Date: 02/14/2018
Time: 08:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We came across this while hiking in the jungle.  Wasn’t able to find a name for it, but the local person we were with suggested it could jump.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Edgerton

Wandering Spider, we believe

Dear Mike,
This is really an interesting Spider, but other than to say it appears to be a hunting spider that does not build a web to entrap prey, we aren’t sure about its identity.  Many hunting spiders can jump quite well.  It looks very much like the spider in a posting in our archives, also from Ecuador, that we identified as possibly a Wandering Spider in the genus
Phoneutria, a venomous and potentially dangerous genus.  The spotted legs on your individual look like the spotted legs on an individual in an image on Wikipedia of a Wandering Spider in the genus Phoneutria.  There are many images of Brazilian Wandering Spiders on Primal Shutter and we believe that might be a correct identification for your individual.

Thank you for the information.  After reading more about the spider, I’m glad it didn’t jump!
Mike

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Guerrero, Mexico
Date: 02/06/2018
Time: 09:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, found this bug. Never seen it before and can’t seem to find info anywhere
How you want your letter signed:  Ricardo Autrey

Jumping Spider

Dear Ricardo,
This is a harmless Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  Here is a similar looking individual posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nephila species
Geographic location of the bug:  dunno
Date: 02/04/2018
Time: 12:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I visited the insect collection at the University of Minnesota and they had a very large Nephila that was totally green.  Since it’s not an insect they had not bothered with any provenance!  I have a thing for Nephila and have seen them on several continents, but never saw one like this.  Do you know a species or where it might be from?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  scott

Golden Silk Spider, but what species???

Dear Scott,
We are surprised the University of Minnesota could not provide you with at least a location where this impressive Golden Silk Spider was collected.  We suspect the colors might have changed from what they were when it was alive, but if anything, the green may have been even more vivid.  We will post your image and perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had scouring the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Red Legged Purseweb Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  humble texas
Date: 02/02/2018
Time:  12:35 AM
Your letter to the bugman:  sir, I was going through my pic’s and vid’s and I found some more pictures and vid of the red legged purse spider I also found in humble Texas a few years ago like the red velvet And I released it on its way as to cause it no harm only to look at it and was amazed at the size of it and the what looked like massive fangs. i hope you can enjoy these items.
How you want your letter signed:  Mr David Mullins

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Dear Mr David Mullins,
Thanks so much for sending your beautiful images of an endangered male Red Legged Purseweb Spider.

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination