Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What spider is this carrying it’s egg sac?
Geographic location of the bug:  Robertson, Western Cape, South Africa
Date: 08/13/2018
Time: 12:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
We were wondering if you could tell us what kind of spider this is carrying it’s egg sac?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Pearce

Nursery Web Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Pearce,
We can narrow this identification down to the family, but we cannot say for certain that we know the genus or species.  There are two families of Spiders where the female carries about the egg sac.  Wolf Spiders in the family Lycosidae drag the egg sac from the spinnerets while Nursery Web Spiders, including Fishing Spiders, in the family Pisauridae carry the egg sac in the chelicerae or fangs.  Your individual is a Nursery Web Spider.  According to BioDiversity Explorer:  “All pisaurids construct a round white egg case that is carried under the sternum held in the chelicerae (jaws). This causes them to assume a tiptoe stance. Just before the eggs are due to hatch, the female constructs a nursery web around the egg case. This is attached to the vegetation with a supporting web around it. The spiderlings leave the nursery after one or two moults.”  Wikimedia Commons has an image that looks very much like your individual, and it is identified as
Chiasmopes lineatus, but there are no images of that genus on BioDiversity Explorer.  The only other representative of the genus we could find is on Project Noah, but it is a much thinner and smaller male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug ?
Geographic location of the bug:  on the Hillsborough river in Tampa Florida
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 12:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was kayaking on the Hillsborough river – yesterday August 10th, at about 11am.  I saw this thing floating on the water, and then it just disappeared under the water.  About 10 seconds later it came back up to the top.  It was fairly large, about 5″ long – so it doesn’t seem to fit any of the water strider pics I’ve been able to find online.  It started “skating” towards my kayak so I used my paddle to swirl the water so it could not get to my boat.  I can’t find anything about this online.  Any ideas ?
How you want your letter signed:  With an answer – LOL

Fishing Spider

How exciting.  You had an encounter with a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, most likely a Six Spotted Fishing Spider, Dolomedes triton, the member of the genus that is most often found “walking on water.”  Fishing Spiders earned their common name because the most aquatic members of the genus are able to dive beneath the surface of the water both to escape predators and to capture prey, including small fish, tadpoles and aquatic insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of spider is this ?
Geographic location of the bug:  Falmouth, Cape Cod, Mass
Date: 08/09/2018
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thank you for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  M. O”Neill

Marbled Orbweaver

Dear M.,
Yellow is one common color variation for the Marbled Orbweaver.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

You’re the best!  Thank you!
Apologies for brevity and any typos.  Message sent via mobile device.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Drama on my Sweet Sarah clone
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/04/2018
Time: 11:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I hope you don’t mind that I keep sending pictures of the same two predators that have taken up residence on my Sweet Sarah clone.  The California Mantis was missing for a few days and then it reappeared looking quite a bit bigger.  I noticed this drama today.  What was really interesting was that as soon as she got close to the Green Lynx Spider, he leaped out of reach.  I haven’t found a single grasshopper on this plant, while I have to pick them off the rest of my crop.
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

California Mantis stalks Green Lynx Spider on a Woody Plant

Dear Constant Gardener,
Keep your images coming.  We applaud your organic gardening methods and natural pest control.  When an insect molts, it becomes much more vulnerable to attack, at least until its new exoskeleton hardens.  Since your California Mantis has grown, it must have molted, so it probably was in hiding until its new exoskeleton hardened sufficiently, explaining why it was missing for a few days. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mysterious insect or arachnid
Geographic location of the bug:  Orange county, CA
Date: 08/03/2018
Time: 06:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I found a dead bug today and it is very very small, the pictures I took are through a basic magnifying glass with my cell phone.  What is throwing me off about this guy is that it looks a lot like a little spider, but from what I can tell, it’s only got 6 legs.  It’s too small for me to really thoroughly inspect it (which is really bugging me!), but with some tweezers I can tell that it’s kind of flat like an unfed tick, and the pincer-looking things might be curled antennae. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Emily

Possibly Wall Spider (far right)

Dear Emily,
Did you find this creature indoors, possibly on a window sill?  Though your image clearly illustrates scale thanks to the inclusion of a penny, it is difficult to make out any details.  We believe this might be a Wall Spider in the genus 
OecobiusBugGuide has some detailed images for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Misumena vatia romance
Geographic location of the bug:  SW Virginia, USA
Date: 08/03/2018
Time: 03:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, this lovely yellow crab spider has been hanging out on a metal picnic table all week. I’ve visited and photographed her over several days. Yesterday, she had what I at first took for a baby but now think is a suitor! He’s just a fraction of her size and his coloration is considerably different. I am not sure how he found her, as there are no flowers or yellow colored items close by. You can just see her hiding under the leaf in the 3rd photo. I did not see them interact. What do you think? Also, what are the indentations that make her abdomen look upholstered? Thanks! Love your site!
How you want your letter signed:  Crab spider fan

Crab Spider

Dear Crab spider fan,
Though we cannot recall reading about pheromones and Spiders, there must be some means by which a male spider is able to locate a mate.  Your images, though they do not document any actual mating activity, are still a wonderful addition to our Bug Love page.

Pair of Crab Spiders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination