Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this gorgeous spider?
Location: Central Ohio
April 25, 2017 12:59 pm
Hello! Recently converted arachnophobe here – made friends with an argiope aurantia last year…now I’m fascinated with our spider buddies, and have educated myself on the various species in my area (Central Ohio). I walk my property every day looking for new friends, and I came across this absolutely beautiful spider. She was hanging out in a very fuzzy, messy web (not an orbweaver-like web), and did me the courtesy of posing for photos taken with my phone. Very docile, green legs, white and yellow underbelly…but no idea what she is. Any idea? Thank you!
Signature: Jaime

Unknown Spider

Dear Jaime,
At first glance we thought this resembled an Orchard Spider, but closer inspection caused us to change our minds, plus it is early in the year for an Orchard Spider in Ohio, and the web you described does not fit.  We searched through the genera of the Comb Footed Spiders in the family Theridiidae on BugGuide and we could not find a match.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this spider.

Unknown Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider ID please
Location: Cochise County, Arizona
April 25, 2017 4:55 pm
Hello Bugman,
I found this spider in a space between a door and the screen. It is shiny and I first thought of black widow but it doesn’t have the red hourglass on the abdomen. What it can be? I appreciate your help so that I can open that door again.
Signature: Kana

Immature Western Black Widow

Dear Kana,
This is definitely an immature Widow, probably a Western Black Widow.  Here is a matching image from BugGuide.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your quick reply. I have never seen a black widow spider and wanted to know where they live (to avoid them). Never imagined they live so close!
Kana
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy large black spider, New Mexico
Location: Rio rancho, NM
April 18, 2017 9:32 pm
I have several of these around my home and I just want to know what kind of spiders they are. I cannot find anything online and I refuse to spray. I just need to know if they are poisonous.
Signature: Rainah

Unknown Spider

Dear Rainah,
Your images were quite dark, but we used some post-production image adjustment to lighten them enough to support our suspicion that this Crevice Weavers Spider is most likely a female Southern House Spider,
Kulcania hibernalis, based on images posted to BugGuide.  This species exhibits extreme sexual dimorphism, meaning the two sexes look like different species.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”  Though BugGuide data does not indicate any New Mexico sightings, they are found in nearby Texas and as far west as California, so a New Mexico sighting is quite probable.  This might also be the closely related Kukulcania arizonica, which is pictured on BugGuide and which is reported from New Mexico.  Of the entire genus, BugGuide states:  “These spiders create a tube-like retreat in cracks. This spider varies greatly in color from light brown to dark black. Females are generally grey to black while the males are tan.”  While we suspect a bite might occur through careless handling or accidental encounters, the House Spiders are not a threat to humans and they might help control other less desirable household intruders like cockroaches and scorpions.

Unknown Spider

Ed. Note:  April 26, 2017
A comment from Cesar Crash has caused us to back off what we thought was an identification.  We are now unsure of the family classification.  There is a resemblance to the Common House Spider from the UK, and a search of the genus
Tegenaria on BugGuide turned up some interesting information, especially regarding an unpictured species “T. chiricahuae – caves in southeastern Arizona and New Mexico (our only native Tegenaria).”  Needless to say, we are classifying this as a Spider at this time until we feel more confident regarding a family designation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this flattie(?) really Selenops?
Location: Down Rio Chucunaque from Yaviza, Darien, Panama
April 14, 2017 6:33 am
I found this flat spider “squashed” against a small tree trunk in the Darien Gap in Panama. It seems to be the same as or related to the ones in the news a couple years ago that can glide from a treetop back to the trunk, which those articles called Selenops. The spider was 3-4 cm long with legs, and when I finally disturbed it, it scampered nimbly around the tree.
This was in dense forest
Signature: Peter H

Flattie

Dear Peter,
Selenops is a genus in the family Selenopidae, commonly called Flatties, that is also found in North America and is represented on BugGuide where it states:  “Selenops is from Greek selene (σεληνη)- ‘moon’ + ops (ωψ)- ‘eye, face’. Latreille translated it into French as ‘yeux en croissant’ which means ‘eyes in a crescent'” and though there is no diagram on BugGuide, the eyes on your individual do appear in a crescent form.  Additionally the morphology of your individual is very similar to the images posted to BugGuide.  The pedipalps on your individual lead us to believe it is a male Flattie.  Its camouflage is quite remarkable and we can’t believe you actually spotted it in a “dense forest.”  Flatties are hunting spiders that do not build webs.

Flattie

Flattie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another long-legged flat spider from Darien
Location: Darien, Panama
April 13, 2017 3:37 pm
This spider was in the same vicinity as one I posted recently (https://www.whatsthatbug.com/2017/04/13/nursery-web-spider-panama-believe/ ). This one looks like it could be the same species but it has a tiny triangular abdomen.
Signature: Peter H

Nursery Web Spider

Hi again Peter,
This does look like the same species of spider to us, and the smaller abdomen might be due to this particular individual not having fed in some time.  Including the image of the Spider’s face is a big assistance in confirming that both this individual and the previous individual are indeed Nursery Web Spiders, and probably Fishing Spiders in the genus
Dolomedes, because the eye pattern on your Spider matches the genus pattern pictured on BugGuide.

Close-up of the face of a Nursery Web Spider showing Eye Pattern

Nursery Web Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible trapdoor spider?
Location: Eastern Kentucky
April 11, 2017 2:29 pm
I was pulling up clumps of ornamental grass from a raised bed and noticed a white “sack” that came up on the roots of one clump. There was a tear on one side of the sack and I could see a large, dark, shiny spider inside. While I was trying to figure out what to do about it, I noticed tiny spiders crawling out of the sack. (The second image shows them.) I’m assuming they were her babies. I left her there with the youngsters while I finished cleaning the raised bed. When I came back, she had crawled out of the nest and was walking across the deck. I encouraged her to move where she wouldn’t be stepped on and put the clump of grass and nest beside her. I went back later, but she was nowhere to be seen. I’ve checked the images here on whatsthatbug and I think she’s a trapdoor spider.
Signature: Kentucky Gin

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Kentucky Gin,
We agree that this is a Trapdoor Spider, probably a female Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Ummidia based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Dig tunnel in ground and seal with a silk-hinged lid. They hide under this lid and make forays out when prey is sensed, presumably by vibration. Males are often found wandering in late spring, presumably looking for mates.”  Because of your gentle kindness in relocating this little lady, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider with Spiderlings

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination