Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Looks like a transformer
Geographic location of the bug:  Broomfield Colorado
Date: 04/16/2018
Time: 08:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This little creep was on the hood of my car. Never seen anything like it! Just curious. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Becky in CO

Jumping Spider

Dear Becky,
Because they are hunting spiders that do not build webs to snare prey, Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae have excellent eyesight, and they frequently track the movements of humans in their vicinity, making them among the most personable spiders in the world.  The metallic green chelicerae or fangs of this individual are quite striking, leading us to believe this is probably Phidippus audax, the Bold Jumper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this beautiful spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cumming, GA
Date: 04/14/2018
Time: 11:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was watering the plants in my garden and saw a bizarre pattern on my apple tree.  As I got closer I couldn’t decide if it was part of the tree or if it was a really well camouflaged bug.  I had to get really close to see that it was a spider!  I have never seen anything like it.  It was perfectly blended into the bark of the tree.  What is this amazing spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious in GA

Probably White Banded Fishing Spider

Dear Curious in GA,
This magnificent spider is a Fishing Spider in the genus Dolomedes, and we believe it is a White Banded Fishing Spider because of its resemblance to the individual in this image posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  tarantula
Geographic location of the bug:  Ecuadoran andes 30 miles west of Quito
Date: 04/02/2018
Time: 01:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  On a birding tour of Ecuador we found this beauty in the road. It’s about 4-5″ long. Any idea on Species?
How you want your letter signed:  BirderKate

Tarantula

Dear BirderKate,
Your individual resembles this FlickR image identified as being a member of the genus
Pamphobeteus.  We suspect the arachnophiles in our readership may write in with a confirmation or correction.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big Gentle Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Lake Havasu, California side
Date: 04/05/2018
Time: 10:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Well, here we go again! We have moved to Lake Havasu, CA. Upon arrival at our new rental, we noticed a very large spider on the  lanai or screen room which encompasses the home facing the lake. We felt lucky to have this beautiful specimen. Today, this one managed to enter the home and was above my desk. We caught it up and placed it back in the original place we first saw it. We now have another that lives near the outdoor laundry area.
Not quick, somewhat docile, and they do seem to kind of curl up during the day as if resting. Am I correct in identifying this lovely inhabitant as a Huntsman of sorts?
I’d love to know and as usual, look forward to hearing of what this species is. Thanks so much!
Oh and on a side note, we sent a letter months ago about a new Spider we found that we call Aragog.  She was identified as a Southern House Spider. She is doing very well and is happy in her Critter keeper, well fed!
Thanks again! Love this site!
How you want your letter signed:  Keeper of T’s

Huntsman Spider

Dear Keeper of T’s,
We hare happy to hear that Aragog is still thriving.  Your new spider is indeed a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider, and we have seen this species referred to as a Golden Huntsman Spider in the past, but BugGuide does not include that common name for
Olios giganteus.  Interestingly, according to Spider ID:  “Olios giganteus has been primarily sighted during the month of March.”  According to Desert Museum:  “This is a hunting spider that wanders in search of insect prey, then relies on speed to catch it. During the day it hides, its flattened body perfectly designed for fitting into narrow cracks or fissures. At night it comes out to hunt. Reportedly, its bite is painful, though it is not dangerous to humans. These spiders generally settle into one place only at egg-laying time. Females produce large egg bags that they hide in and guard.”

Huntsman Spider

Wonderful! And March was our first sighting! Splendid creatures indeed! =]
Thank you for your response,
ŞĦĄŔŐŊ

Huntsman Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Painted carnage!
Geographic location of the bug:  Irrelevant
Date: 03/28/2018
Time: 07:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, Bugman! I work at a retail store in South Dakota, but much of our merchandise is made in China. I think this poor creature must have been painted into this canister at the factory in China. Can you identify, despite his ‘blue mood’? Hard to say with legs folded under, but I’d put the length of each limb at 3″+. For scale, the floor tiles are 12″x12″.
How you want your letter signed:  Josh M

Huntsman Spider painted Blue

Dear Josh,
We agree with your assessment that this Spider must have been painted at the factory.  We believe this is a male Giant Huntsman Spider,
Heteropoda venatoria, a species that has been introduced to many parts of the world because of banana shipments.  This would have made a good April Fool’s posting were it not for real.

Huntsman Spider painted at factory

Canister where Huntsman Spider was found.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  South Louisiana Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  South Louisiana
Date: 03/25/2018
Time: 09:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found my dog barking  and observed it was a fairly large spider I have not seen before. Was curious to find out which it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Glenn D

Wolf Spider

Dear Glenn,
This looks to us like a harmless Wolf Spider in the family Lycosidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination