Currently viewing the category: "Spiders"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Id spider please
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama, western highlands 5400 ft
Date: 02/10/2020
Time: 11:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi – help id this spider who was staying still on the floor of my house in western panama highlands. About 2+ inches as in pic
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy S

Flattie, NOT Giant Crab Spider

Dear Nancy,
This is a harmless Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  Here is an image from Flickr of a Giant Crab Spider from Panama.  We are uncertain of your species.  Giant Crab Spiders are nocturnal and they do not spin a web to snare prey.  They hunt.

Correction Courtesy of Cesar Crash: 
I think it’s a flattie, Selenops sp.

Ed. Note:  See images of a Flattie from Costa Rica on Quaoar Power Zoo.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hairy Momma?
Geographic location of the bug:  Oroville, CA (Butte County)
Date: 01/28/2020
Time: 06:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this hairy lurker on the inside of the doorjamb of an old truck in mid January 2020.  Weather’s been in the 40-60*F range, with rain.  Grabbed a quick photo, but can’t find a plausible ID anywhere….can you help?
Thinking this may be a female in the process of establishing an egg sac, perhaps?  Gorgeous, but too hairy for most IDs to match.
How you want your letter signed:  Cole

Golden Huntsman Spider

Dear Cole,
This is a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the genus
Olios, probably Olios giganteus, a Golden Huntsman Spider.  According to Spider ID:  “Egg sac is spun inside a large, spherical retreat (about 25mm in diameter) in which the female spider also resides, guarding the sac and the spiderlings that emerge from it.”  According to Backyard Nature:  “This Southwestern US and Mexican, arid-land, nocturnal species is known to spin silken “retreats” in which it may spend the day, or to complete molting. Also, the female may spin such a retreat to stay in as she guards her egg sac and the spiderlings who emerge from the sac.”  This species is also represented on BugGuide.

Ah HA!  Thank you so much!!  I love love love you folks, and am so grateful for what you do.   Your site is a phenomenal resource!!
HUGS!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Blue jumping spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Topeka KS
Date: 11/18/2019
Time: 05:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw a previous question about a blue jumping spider during my search. This little guy was at the storage units my mom works at. No altering to the photo at all. Not a hoax. I couldnt find much online about blue spiders. Coolest little spider I’ve seen. I think it’s a jumping spider?
How you want your letter signed:  Brandy

Jumping Spider

Dear Brandy,
This is definitely a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, and it does appear to be quite bluish, but we cannot provide you with a species name.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Big ass spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Statenisland NY 10312
Date: 11/06/2019
Time: 07:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this this big a×× spider…. it jumps
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks Elizabeth

Fishing Spider

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes.  Though it is large and frightening, Fishing Spiders are not aggressive towards humans and the bite is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider eats Budworm
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 10/23/2019
Time: 07:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Exactly one month ago, I sent in images of a Green Lynx Spider that laid an egg sac on one of my medical marijuana plants, and this morning I noticed her eating a Budworm, and her brood has hatched.  I thought they would hatch in the spring.  What gives?
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider eats a Budworm while guarding brood.

Dear Constant Gardener,
Thanks for keeping our readership up to date on the mundane dramas in your garden.  Daniel has always thought that the eggs of Green Lynx Spiders would hatch in the spring.  Lower beasts are much more attuned to their environments than are most humans, and perhaps global warming is affecting the hatching cycle of Green Lynx Spiders.  According to the Orlando Sentinel:  “A green lynx spider’s egg sac is much easier to spot than the spider itself. The sac is a slightly bumpy, sand-colored container housing up to 600 bright orange eggs that will hatch within 11 to 16 days. The sac is about an inch diameter with one flat side and one rounded. After its construction is complete, the female spider surrounds the sac with a sketchy tent of randomly woven silky threads. She then protects it further by clutching it with her legs as she hangs upside down.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Calca, Sacred Valley Peru
Date: 10/20/2019
Time: 07:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
While at a yoga retreat in the Andes, this morning I was on my way to meditation practice and I saw this beauty  right next to my shoes. Please tell me who it is, and if they may also enjoy morning meditation and asana practice.
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Wolf Spider

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
This sure looks like a harmless Wolf Spider to us.  Wolf Spiders are hunting spiders that do not build a web to trap prey, so they are often found wandering at night in search of prey.  A very similar looking Peruvian Wolf Spider can be found on the blog Spiders in Nature, but you need to scroll down to find it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination