Currently viewing the category: "Snakeflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Long neck, not a mantis?
Sun, Apr 19, 2009 at 6:41 PM
Stanford university, tall grass, mixed oak woodland, middle of a hot spring day. On my leg, probably from the grass.
Dave H
Palo Alto, Ca, USA

Snakefly

Snakefly

Hi Dave,
This is the third Snakefly image we have posted from California in a short period of time.  Perhaps it is a more plentiful year for this harmless predator, or perhaps people are just more closely observing the other creatures we share this troubled world with.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Jaws of a beatle, wings of a cicda, and a needle like tail?
Wed, Apr 8, 2009 at 12:59 PM
I happened to notice something in my door jamb so I grabbed my camera a took a couple of photos. I didn’t mess with it because it looked like it could bite or sting me, lol. I live in Concord, CA and there is an abundence of insects that I have never seen. This being the most interesting one I’ve ever seen. I hope the image will provide enough info for you.
Thank you so much for looking, Brodie
Northern California Concord, CA

Snakefly

Snakefly

Hi Brodie,
This is a female Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.  Snakeflies are harmless predators and the stinger is actually the ovipositor of the female insect.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Unknown Northern California Bug
Sun, Apr 5, 2009 at 3:06 PM
Hello. We live in Palo Alto, CA and have recently stumbled across this ugly bug. It is approximately an inch long, has what looks like a stinger, long wings, and a long neck. My husband thought it might be a sort of baby praying mantis, but after looking at it longer, we agree it must be something else. Does it sting is my question. We recently had a really bad gnat problem on our balcony and I feel like these bugs are living off of the dead gnats. Here is a picture, I hope it helps!
Concerned Stanford Family.
Palo Alto, California, USA

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Family,
There is no cause for concern or alarm.  This is a Snakefly in the insect order Raphidioptera.  Both larval and adult Snakeflies are predators so they are beneficial insects.  The “stinger” is actually the ovipositor of the female insect, and is used in the egg laying process.  It is not an organ of defense and the Snakefly does not sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Winged But with Long Neck
Sat, Feb 28, 2009 at 11:43 AM
Hi! I’ve seen this guy three times in the last week and finally got him to sit still for a picture. He seems to be alone, there is no swarm. He hangs out on walls and flies only as a last resort. We’ve just had some spring rains, so maybe that has something to do with his appearance now. Thanks for your help!
STW
Santa Barbara, CA

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear STW,
Over the years, we have had countless letters from people who want buts identified. Perhaps it is the proximity of the g to the t on a keyboard. This is a Snakefly. Snakeflies are in the order Raphidioptera and according to BugGuide: “Formerly Raphidioidea, a suborder of Neuroptera. ” That means we need to reclassify all the Snakefly postings on our site to conform to the new taxonomy. Adults and larvae are both predatory.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for the Snakefly info.  And I also appreciate your kind treatment of my lack of typing skills!
You’ve got a great site.
STW

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination