Currently viewing the category: "Snakeflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug hiding on lupine
Location: Sunol-Ohlone Wilderness, CA
April 15, 2015 7:31 pm
I was taking a photo of the bee on the lupine, and only noticed later the insect that was upside down on the stalk. I have no idea what it is, can you please help me identify it?
Signature: R. Battaglia

Solitary Bee shares Lupine with Snakefly

Solitary Bee shares Lupine with Snakefly

Dear R. Battaglia,
The insect hiding along the stalk of the lupine is a Snakefly, in the order Raphidioptera, and according to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods.”
  Though females possess an ovipositor that resembles a stinger, Snakeflies are harmless to humans.  We are very curious about your Solitary Bee because of our interest our own in native pollinators and their relationship to native plants.  This may be a Leafcutter Bee in the genus Megachile, and BugGuide has many subgenera represented, but alas, we would need input from someone with more experience to provide a definitive identification.

Dear Mr. Marlos,
Thank you for the Snakefly ID.  Regarding the bee, although that particular picture was taken in Sunol, I do have a healthy population of leafcutters in my yard in Pleasanton, as evidenced by the many notched leaves of my Redbud.  I’ve had a fabulous collection of native pollinators in my yard this year!
Thanks again,
Robyn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ufb
Location: Crockett, ca
March 17, 2015 2:27 am
Hi, this morning I went into my living room & this bug was just sitting on my blinds. I’ve never seen one like it before. It didn’t scare easily, as I put my camera pretty close, it didn’t budge. I didn’t kill it, but I was a bit worried about the stinger on his backside. What do you think?
Signature: c meyers

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear c meyers,
This is a harmless Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.  Your individual is a female as evidenced by her long ovipositor.  Snakeflies are beneficial predators that will neither sting nor bite a human.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Larvae found in bed
Location: Southern Oregon
December 10, 2014 6:55 pm
This was found on the pillow. Any idea what it might be?
Signature: Will

Snakefly Larva

Snakefly Larva

Dear Will,
We believe this is a harmless, predatory Snakefly Larva.  See this image on BugGuide for comparison.

Thank you!  That would make sense because looking at the link you included, we do have those insects flying around the front door at night.  One must have gotten in the house and completed its lifecycle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Any idea what this is?

Location: Concord, CA.
November 25, 2014 4:49 pm
Dear Bugman,
I have only seen this bug a few times on Contra Costa County of California.
Any idea what it is?
Signature: Don

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Don,
This is one of the best images we have seen of a Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.  Snakeflies are harmless predators.

Thanks Daniel
It was a bug I had never seen before and the first time I saw it was on a hospital floor.
I wondered if it was some kind of rare exotic poisonous bug that had landed somebody in that hospital.
Its good to know its a fairly normal bug. 🙂
Thanks very much for the identification!
Kind Regards,
Don

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unable to Identify Insect…
Location: Sacramento California
June 24, 2014 10:27 pm
Dear Sir,
This insect I found in my home in Sacramento California sometime in early may 2014 I have been trying to identify it if there’s anyway u would be able to me with that id appreciate much…
Thank you..:.
Signature: Jj

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Jj,
This amusing and harmless insect is a predatory Snakefly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little Visitor
Location: Sacramento, CA
November 9, 2013 6:36 pm
Hello,
We found this little one in our house the other day. My toddler ”inspected” it and then let it go in the backyard. Any help in identifying it would be most appreciated. I’ve been looking at native species but can’t seem to identify it. It was found in early November in the Northern Sacramento area in California. The one in the photo is about 3/4” long. Sorry the photo isn’t the best.
Signature: John

Snakefly Larva

Snakefly Larva

Hi John,
This is a harmless, predatory Snakefly larva in the order Raphidioptera.  Adult Snakeflies are rather curious looking insects with long necks that look somewhat prehistoric.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination