Currently viewing the category: "Snakeflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please identify this pretty bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Sisters, Oregon USA
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 10:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This beautiful bug caught my attention because it resembles a dinosaur and seemed to calmly interact with me while I took pictures. Pictures taken today July 15th 2018 at 7pm. Thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  Starla Kay Lajko

Snakefly

Dear Starla,
This primitive looking insect is a Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods. Adults take efforts to clean themselves after feeding. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  long necked termite?
Geographic location of the bug:  Chatsworth, California
Date: 03/07/2018
Time: 04:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this guy on our screen this morning. Looks like an alien termite to me! I’ve never seen anything like it before. Thank you for the help! 🙂
How you want your letter signed:  KC

Snakefly

Dear KC,
Though it resembles a Termite, you encountered a beneficial, predatory Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.

Thank you so much! You’re awesome! 🙂
Kendall Clark

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject —
What’s that??
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern California
Date: 10/25/2017
Time: 11:31 PM EDT
Hello bug Man!  Can you help me identify what this is?  Very thin about an inch to an inch and a half at most. Was in my room…
I hope you can shed some light.
Many thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Harsha

Snakefly larva

Dear Harsha,
This is a harmless Snakefly larva.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Olympia Washington
Date: 09/06/2017
Time: 03:37 PM EDT
This is the oddest bug I’ve seen.
S/he is roughly an inch and a half long and maybe 4mm wide. I was told it might be a soldier beetle?
How you want your letter signed:  Tammi

Snakefly Larva

Dear Tammi,
This is a beneficial, predatory larva of a Snakefly.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods. Adults take efforts to clean themselves after feeding.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long bug with clear wings
Location: San Mateo CA
April 30, 2017 9:29 am
This bug was on our bathroom mirror this week. We have never seen such a bug. When I googled it, I get Mayfly or snake fly. We would like your expert clarification please. We are on the San Francisco Peninsula.
Thank you!
Signature: Curious

Snakefly

Dear Curious,
This is an awesome image of a Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods. Adults take efforts to clean themselves after feeding.”

Hi Daniel,
Thank you! Wow… so cool! I asked all my local friends who grew up here and no one knew. Now we do thanks to you!
Much appreciated.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: 2 bugs to identify
Location: Petaluma, CA
February 7, 2017 11:38 am
These are 2 bugs that I saw in my garden March 2016. Please identify them for me. Thank you so much!!
Signature: Sharon Risedorph

Molting Snakefly

Dear Sharon,
This is an Earwig, and it appears to be injured.

Thank you so much Daniel!!!
All the best,
Sharon

Eric Eaton provides a Correction
Hi, Daniel:
Female snakefly trying to shake off the pupa molt.
Eric

WOW!!  Thank you!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination