Currently viewing the category: "Snails, Slugs and other Molluscs"
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Insects
Location:  Orlando, Fl
October 13, 2010 3:22 pm
Dear Bugman, I was out by the lake taking pictures, when I spotted this little guy. I’ve lived in Fl all my life, where weird bugs are the norm. But I have never seen anything like it before. Could you please tell me what type of insect this is? Thanks, I appreciate your help!
Signature:  Sincerely, Karen V

Monkey Slug

Hi Karen,
This is a Monkey Slug Caterpillar, but it looks quite different from other Monkey Slugs on our website, and we believe that this is because it is an earlier instar.  We did find a matching image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spotted Leopard Slugs Mating
April 21, 2010
Hi WTB!
I snapped these photos of a pair of what I think are Spotted Leopard Slugs doing the wild thing hanging from a thick strand of slime attached to the side of my house. At one point, there were two males trying to get to the female, but one fell off. This was the end result. A gooey sky blue slime wad. I never knew slugs mated like that! I thought maybe you could use this for your site.
Keep up the great work! I slug-love What’s That Bug!
Rebecca White
Charlotte, NC

Spotted Leopard Slugs Mating

Dear Rebecca,
The mating positions of these hermaphroditic Spotted Leopard Slugs is positively salacious.  All slugs are hermaphrodites, so you are mistaken in believing that the third member in the encounter was a male.  The close-up photograph you included is quite graphic, and viewers should exercise caution before reading more. Read Full Article →

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Slug or Snail Eggs, Maybe Not?
October 25, 2009
Dear Bug Man,
I’m pretty sure these are not bug eggs, but I am confident you can help ID these things.
I discovered this cluch of eggs under a pile of wet and decaying wood.
Thanks for the help,
W. Matthews
San Antonio, TX

Amphibian Eggs perhaps???

Amphibian Eggs perhaps???

Hi W. Matthews,
We agree they are not insect eggs, and we would also probably discount snail or slug eggs.  We believe they may be Amphibian Eggs, though it is also possible they are some type of fungus or mushroom.  Hopefully one of our readers may supply an answer.

Update:  June 1, 2014
We stand corrected.  Thanks to a new inquiry following a comment from W. Parks, we have learned that this is an egg clutch of the Florida Leatherleaf Slug,
Leidyula floridana.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Photo of slug with eyes showing
August 14, 2009
Hi Folks —
I love your site and thought you might enjoy this photo of a leopard slug in which I can even see the eyes! I found him/her in the undergrowth of my garden outside of Philadelphia, PA in August, where we’ve been having an incredibly wet summer.
Thanks for your good work!
Betsy
Merion Station, PA

Leopard Slug

Leopard Slug

Hi Betsy,
Thanks for sending us your photo of a Leopard Slug, Limax maximus, a species introduced to North America from Europe.  Eyesight in Leopard Slugs is quite limited, as the primitive eyes at the stalks of the tentacles are sensitive to light and dark, but not much else.  We found a nice Leopard Slug page with basic information, and the Bottlebrush Slug Page created by James K. Sayre has left us with a new appreciation for these lower beasts that proliferate in our garden and eat tender young plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Banana Slugs
Sat, Jul 4, 2009 at 7:23 PM
Here are a few pictures of banana slugs. The first picture is of a spotted banana slug…I have no idea why some are spotted and others aren’t, just different species? The second picture shows how big they can get. And in the third picture I was lucky enough to come upon the banana slug as it was devouring a flower petal. One of the weirder things I’ve seen, as it ate it extremely fast- but not the best picture. Enjoy!
katebell
Northern California

Banana Slug

Banana Slug

Dear katebell,
Thanks so much for sending in these photos of Banana Slugs, Ariolimax columbianus, in such a timely manner.  According to the Pacific Natural History Projects website:  “The Banana Slug can grow up to 12 inches (26 centimeters) and is the world’s second largest slug.  …  The coloration of the Banana Slug may be a bright yellow, slate-green, or white with or without black spots. ”  Further in the website, it is indicated that:  “During mating season, the slime contains a chemical, which entices other slugs to follow.
Slugs are hermaphroditic which means they have both male and female reproductive organs.   Normally, slugs trade sperm with other slugs, but can fertilize their own eggs.   They may lay 12 to 100 eggs at a time and up to 50 to 150 eggs each year.  The eggs are pearl-like in color and about the size of a person’s pinky fingernail.  The eggs are laid in clusters under logs, rocks, and in the soil.  Eggs are laid in the early spring, late summer and early fall.  Most adults die after laying eggs.  The eggs laid in the late summer or early fall may not hatch until spring.  It takes three to four weeks for the eggs to hatch.
Slugs may feast upon a variety of plants as well as fungi and decomposing vegetative matter.  The slugs use their radula to scrape food off the source.  The slugs may be preyed upon by garter snakes, ducks, geese, shrews, moles, beetles, crows, and salamanders.  Raccoons have a trick to deal with the slime.  They will roll the slug in dirt to coat the slime.
Slugs have a pair of tentacles which they use to gather information about their environment.  The pair of tentacles located on the top of the head has a small black spot at each tip.  These tentacles are used to detect lightness and darkness.  Slugs prefer dark and moist areas.  The second pair of tentacles is located at the lower anterior end and functions as a nose.  These tentacles pick up chemical smells especially during mating season.  Most of the food sources are located by using both pairs of tentacles. ”

Banana Slug

Banana Slug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hard shell purple bug at the coast of Puerto Rico
Thu, Feb 26, 2009 at 7:12 PM
I was staying at a hotel on the east coast of the island of Puerto Rico and went to the shore to look at the ocean at around midday. This thing was purple, had a hard shell, did not move at all, about 5 inches long and 3 inches wide. It was withing the rocks. This was in summer 2006.
Melyssa
East coast of Puerto Rico

Chiton

Chiton

Dear Melyssa,
The creature in your photograph is a Chiton. Chitons are primitive marine molluscs that have shells composed of 8 plates. The shells provide protection against waves which enable Chitons to survive on stormy rocky coasts. Chitons are sometimes called Sea Cradles.

Comment:
Sat, Feb 28, 2009 at 5:58 AM
Hi Daniel, Ah, another mollusk! This is Acanthopleura granulata (Gmelin, 1791), the West Indian fuzzy chiton. The shell plates of this chiton are actually brownish and are usually very eroded. The pink/purple color on this one is due to a layer of encrusting calcareous red algae. For more info see the Wikipedia article (which I put together.) Best wishes to you,
Susan J. Hewitt

Comment Update:
Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 4:43 AM
I wanted to add:
1. That these chitons do move around, but only at night, grazing on microscopic algae which grows on the rock surface. Each one returns to its same spot on the rock at the end of the night.
2. That the maximum size of this species is about 3 inches in length.
3. There is a really excellent book on the chitons of P.R. called “Los Quitones de Puerto Rico” by Cedar I. Garcia Rios.
Susan Hewitt

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination