Currently viewing the category: "Scorpions, Whipscorpions and Vinegaroons"

Subject: Scorpion?
Location: Central Arizona
November 14, 2015 3:27 pm
Found on a wall after dusk. Have seen these several times.
Signature: Brian

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear Brian,
This is not a true Scorpion, but as its common name implies, this Tailless Whipscorpion is classfied, along with Spiders and Scorpions, in the class Arachnida, but they are all divided up at the order level of taxonomy.  Unlike Spiders and Scorpions, Tailless Whipscorpions lack venom, so they are not considered dangerous to humans.  They do, however, possess powerful mandibles that they use to crush and chew prey, and if they are carelessly handled, a painful bite may result.  They are shy, nocturnal hunters that generally flee from humans if encountered.

Subject: Harvestman?
Location: Glenmore, KZN
September 20, 2015 8:29 am
Good Day,
My parents found this bug in their garden shed in Glenmore, KZN. Does anybody know what bug this is?
Signature: Nielen

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear Nielen,
This Tailless Whipscorpion in the Arachnid Order Amblypygi is a shy, nocturnal hunter that poses to threat to humans as Tailless Whipscorpions do not have venom.  They do have strong mandibles and might bite if carelessly handled, but they are more likely to scuttle away to avoid a confrontation.  Allowing it to live in the garden shed will help to reduce the numbers of roaches, spiders and other creatures that might pose a bigger threat to humans.

Subject: a pretty alright vinegaroon
Location: she’s a pet, so anywhere, but California native.
September 13, 2015 1:02 pm
Yo! Just submitting some pictures of vinegaroons, since they’re so cool and I didn’t see many pictures of them doing much but standing in the defensive posture. Here’s my girlie eating, carrying babies, and posing.
Signature: Vinegaroon Salad

Vinegaroon and Brood

Vinegaroon and Brood

Dear Vinegaroon Salad,
Thanks for sending in your images of your pet Vinegaroon and her brood.

Vinegaroon

Vinegaroon

Subject: whipspiders!
Location: she’s a pet, so anywhere.
September 13, 2015 12:57 pm
I didn’t see very many pictures of Tanzanian giant whipspiders on the site, so I thought you might want some of one happily eating, one freshly molted and one intact molt. I’ve seen a lot of people get confused by the changed coloration between a molt, a freshly molted, and an average one. So, here you go!
Signature: Vinegaroon salad

Pet Whipscorpion

Pet Whipscorpion

Dear Vinegaroon salad,
Thank you for sending your images of your pet Tanzanian Giant Whipscorpion.

Subject: Tailless Whipscorpion
Location: Mexican border with Guatemala
February 8, 2015 11:08 am
I took this picture on 1/29/2015, identified by the guide as a whip scorpion. But I think it might actually be a tailless whipscorpion, as it has no tail. The picture was taken with a flash inside a Maya ruin at Yaxchilan. I think that the flash has caused shadows so that the legs look “double”. Yaxchilan is on the Mexican side of the Usumacinta River – the border to Guatemala.
From another of your articles, it appears that this creature is from the order Amblypygi , but I was wondering if the species can be identified. “BUG GUIDE” is only for US & Canada, and this creature is Mexican/ Central American.
Signature: Thanks, Bob Williamson

Tailless Whipscorpion

Tailless Whipscorpion

Dear  This Bob,
We don’t generally attempt to identify Tailless Whipscorpions beyond the order, but perhaps one of our readers will write in with more information.
  We did locate a pdf entitled LOS AMBLIPÍGIDOS O TENDARAPOS DE MÉXICO (ARACHNIDA: AMBLYPYGI) by Luis F. de Armas that contains the following information:  “The whip spiders or tailless whipscorpions of Mexico (Arachnida: Amblypygi)  Abstract: The Mexican fauna of whip spiders or tailless whipscorpions contains 20 species belonging to the genera Acantho- phrynus Kraepelin, 1899 (one species), Paraphrynus Moreno, 1940 (11 species) and Phrynus Lamarck, 1801 (8 species) (Phrynidae: Phryninae). Only five (25%) of these species are not Mexican endemics, whereas six Paraphrynus species are troglobites. Paraphrynus and Phrynus have 82% and 50% of endemic species, respectively. The highest specific richness and endemism are concentrated in the southeastern states (Chiapas, Oaxaca and Quintana Roo).”

Hey Daniel:
Thanks for the quick response.  As I look closer at my photo, I can see some banding on the legs, which I previously missed.  I know that the Amblypygi name ending in “Mexico” (which of course I cannot relocate on the web now that I want to again) did not look like this one, mainly because of the light brown and banded legs.  Maybe the flash is hiding that a little.
This was the first time I have seen one and because of the size, it is certainly scary looking.  I was surprised to find out it can neither bite nor sting humans.
Thanks for your help.
Later, This Bob.

Hi again This Bob,
Tailless Whipscorpions do not have venom and they do not have stingers, so they pose no threat to humans.  We thought we once read that a large specimen might bite, but according to BugGuide:  “No venom glands, and do not sting or bite. If disturbed, they scuttle sideways.”

 

 

Subject: Vaejovis carolinianus Scorpion in Georgia
Location: Columbus, Ga
November 17, 2014 7:03 am
Hi! I was cleaning the bathroom yesterday and found this little guy lounging behind the…uh…facilities. with his tail stretched out he’s almost an inch long. Growing up on the island of Guam, I developed a respect for bugs. This was due mainly to the fact that so many of them wanted to sting, bite, or just generally crawl all over me!
Anyways, with the help of your website I’ve tentatively identified my little houseguest as Vaejovis carolinianus, and am wondering if you concur. He’s living comfortably in a tupperware until I find a suitable home outside for him. We have a little woodpile outside and I plan to release him there once the rain, tornados, and flying mutant undead air-shark attacks stop.
Signature: Geographer

Southern Unstriped Scorpion

Southern Unstriped Scorpion

Dear Geographer,
We concur that this is most likely a Southern Unstriped Scorpion,
Vaejovis carolinianus.  According to BugGuide, it is “‘The only scorpion native to much of the Appalachian states: Kentucky, West Virginia (S), Virginia (SW), North and South Carolina (W), Georgia (North, not coastal or southern, where Centruroides hentzi is found), Alabama (N), Mississippi (NE), Louisiana (tiny, disjunct, area NE of Baton Rouge near MS border), Tennessee (E 2/3).’ – Kari J McWest”